Image from page 178 of “India on the march” (1922)

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Image from page 178 of “India on the march” (1922)
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Identifier: indiaonthemarch00clar
Title: India on the march
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Clark, Alden Hyde, 1878- Missionary Education Movement of the United States and Canada
Subjects: Missions
Publisher: New York : Missionary education movement of the United States and Canada
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

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here are sixty mil-lion who do not get enough to eat except during theharvest time. Is it part of the missionarys job totry to help them earn a better living ? The missionaryanswers emphatically, Yes! Jesus fed the hungry,and we would not be true disciples of our Master ifwe did not try to help men and women and little chil-dren to get enough to eat and enough to wear. Ourvillage schools with their 500,000 pupils help. It is notso easy for the money sharks of India, who alwaysprey upon the poor, to get into their clutches menwho can read and figure. Moreover, thousands of boysand girls from dark, one-room, poverty-stricken homeshave gone through the village school into higher educa-tion and are now earning fair incomes as doctors, nurses,clerks, teachers, or workers in other useful callings. Another way in which the missionaries try to helpis through Cooperative Credit Societies. Have youever heard of a missionary banker? Come to Jalna,and I will show you one who has been decorated by

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Dr. Anna S. Kugler working; with her clerk at the GunturHospital which, under hsr leadership, developed in fifteen yearsfrom a medicine chest to one of tlie largest and finest missionhospitals in South India, with maternity block, chapel, nurseshome, and dispensary. THOSE POOB MISSIONARIES 149 the Government for his services. Rev. W. E. Wilkie-Brown is another typical missionary, a kindly, vigor-ous Scotchman. He found many of the villagers ofthe Jalna district practically the slaves of the moneylender. They had to have money for seed every rainyseason, and they had no money to huy it with, so thatthey had to horrow from the money lender, who waswilling to accommodate them for a little matter ofsixty or eighty per cent a year. Once in the hands ofthe money lender, the poor man never gets out. Hetoils on, and his wife and children toil on. They keeppaying of their little earnings on their deht, but it doesnot grow less. A wedding comes, or sickness, andmore deht and more interest are a

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Image from page 126 of “The art treasures of Washington : an account of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and of the National Gallery and Museum, with descriptions and criticisms of their contents; including, also, an account of the works of art in the Capitol,
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Identifier: arttreasuresofwa00hend
Title: The art treasures of Washington : an account of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and of the National Gallery and Museum, with descriptions and criticisms of their contents; including, also, an account of the works of art in the Capitol, and in the Library of Congress, and of the most important statuary in the city
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Henderson, Helen Weston, 1874-
Subjects: Art museums Art Art
Publisher: Boston : L. C. Page & Company
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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. His Landscape:View from Mount Mansfield/ was received in1. and is considered a masterpiece. Wyant was born in a small town in Ohio, wherehe was subject to the usual artistic privations untilat the age of twenty years he removed to Cincin-nati, where, it IS to be supposed, he first came into contact with artistic productions worthy the name. Though [nness was at this time a comparatively urc painter, Wyant sensed his importance, and feeling within himself something responsive to the greater painters article- of Faith, made the trip to Perth Ambpy, where [lUieSfl then lived, and SOUght his advice and aid. As a painter, Wyant had not the powerful exe-cution nor the varied repertoire of his distinguishedprototype. Glimpses of sunny, rolling country,seen between -lender wood grown trees, form the theme upon which he develops many variations.The Corcoran Gallerys example IS purest pa>toral.With [nness, Wyant, and Homer Martin (the lat-ter not represented in the Gallery J comes the cul-

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zk Cbafn of Hmerican painters 96 miration of the early American school of land-scape painting. In |. Francis Murphy (1853 )we trace a less intelligent leaning upon the methodsof [nness. His October, painted in [888-1893,reflects the subject, style, and mannerisms of the older painter to a marked degree. It came to the Gallery from the Thomas B. Garke sale in 1S00. William Lamb Picknell (1852-1897), who isrepresented in the Gallery by two large landscapes,studied for two years with [nness in Rome, andafterward with Gerome, in Paris. He lived andpainted in Brittany, working under Robert Wylieuntil the death of that artist. The Road to Con-carneau, eonsidered the painters masterpiece, waspainted in 1880, and purchased by the Gallery fromthe Thomas B. Clarke sale, in 1889. The pictureIS clear and brilliant, more like the atmospheric ef-fect of Arizona, in the sharpness of its detail andthe intense blue of the sky, than like France.PicknelTs style was realistic and his method ofpainting d

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Image from page 298 of “The California fruits and how to grow them” (1889)
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Identifier: californiafruits00wick
Title: The California fruits and how to grow them
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wickson, Edward James, 1848- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Fruit-culture
Publisher: San Francisco, Cal., Dewey & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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sh dark and veryjuicy, with a fine flavor.—^John Bidwell. Reported thus far a shy bearer, by JamesShinn, Alameda County. DUKES and MORELLOS. Early Richmond (Kentish).—An early, red, acid cherry; valuable for cookingearly in the season. May Duke.—An old, well-known, excellent variety; large; dark red; juicy,sub-acid, rich. Arch Duke.—Fruit large, obtuse, heart-shaped; bright red becoming dark;flesh light red, melting, juicy, rich, sub-acid flavor; very good. Tree more uprightand vigorous than May Duke. Late Duke.—PVuit large, flattened or obtuse, heart-shaped; white, mottledwith red, becoming rich, dark red when ripe; flesh yellowish, tender, juicy; hangs longon the tree. Dukes and JMorellos. 281 Reine Hortense. — It is one of the very largest of cherries; a Ijeautifiil, glossyred, or deep pink, when fully ripe; heart-shaped; a universal bearer, and whenhanging on the tree, no fruit is more beautiful; excellent for canning, but too soft andjuicy for shipment.—W. W, Smith.

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The Centennial Cherry—A California Seedling. English Morello.—Large; dark red, nearly black; tender, juicy, rich, acid,productive and late. GuiGNE NoiR LuiSANTE (Black Spanish).—Fruit medium size, round, heart-shaped, glossy, blackish red; flesh reddish purple, tender, juicy, rich, acid. Belle Magnifique.—Fruit large, roundish, inclined to heart-3hape; skin a fine,bright red; flesh juicy, lender, with sprightly sub-acid flavor; one of the best of itsclass; a fine table fruit when fully ripe; very late. PACIFIC COAST SEEDLINGS. Black Republican (Lewelling, Black Oregon).—Seedling by Seth Lewelling,Milwaukee, Oregon, from seed planted in i860; first fruited in orchard in 1864. 282 Cherries of Local Origin. Widely distrilnited in California. Large, black, sweet, with purple flesh; ripens tendays after Black Tartarian.—James Shinn. Large, late black cherry, good flavor,long keeper; dries and ships well. Seems to succeed better on foot-hills than in thevalley.—Robert Williams

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Image from page 655 of “Christian proclaim as well as indicators of our times” (1886).

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Picture from web page 655 of “Christian proclaim and indicators of our times” (1886)
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< img alt=" rebuild debt" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/14595808360_bf20869311.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Photo by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14595808360"
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: christianheralds09unse Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidchristianheralds09unse" > Christian herald and signs of our times Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1886" > 1886(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1880" > 1880s) Writers:. Topics:. Author:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_New_York__The_Christian_Herald_" > [New york city, The Christian Herald] Contributing Library:< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorChristian_Herald_Association" > Christian Herald Association Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorTisch_Library__Tufts_University" > Tisch Collection, Tufts University View Publication Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/christianheralds09unse/christianheralds09unse#page/n655/mode/1up" rel= "nofollow ” >
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All Images From Book Click below to view publication online to see this image in context in a browseable online version of this publication. Text Showing up Prior to Picture: sick teem with the naviesof the globe, and also the children of Jacob will fly, asthe doves to their windows, restore the oldwashes and re-establish their old type of wor-ship. THE SCENE OF THE EVENTSin which the globe is currently most interested willbe the Holy Land. How, and also by what meansthe false prophet and the beast will enthrall theworld is just poorly foreshadowed, as well as could butbe judged. Most likely the false prophet willbe staff to the monster, and will stand out himin craft; he might do well in encouraging the Mos-lems that he is their prophet; he might representhim to the Jews as their Messiah; and also to theBuddhists as the Buddha whom they expect.The spiritualists, who may be numbered by mil-lions, will regard him as the best of adepts. The secret of iniquity is already at the workplace tosuch a level as would scarcely be credited.Let Satan when have his will, and a photo maybe made to talk without people being muchsurprised at its so doing. G! 8 THE CHRISTIAN HERALD AND ALSO SIGNS OF OUR TIMES. Oct 14.

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OFF1CK, 63 BIBLE HOUSE, New York City. Esmuoro at the Post-Officb at New York, N. Y., asSecond-Class Matter. Th Ifcifcg. EVERY NUMBER CONSISTS OF: Portrait and Bio of some noteworthy person.Sermon Dr. Taimage taught the previous Sunday morn- An Exposition of Unfinished Prophecy.A Recap of the Occasions of the Week, Notes of Spiritual andTemperance Movements, and so on. A Sermon by Rev. C. H. Spurgeon, of London, from advancesheets sent by unique plan. Images of Missionary Life, etc., and also Descriptive Articles.An instalment of a Serial Tale. A Presentation of tiie International Sunday-School Lesson, byIdrs. M. Baxter. YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION,.50. Compensations by mail must be by bank cheques,Post-office orders, or Express money-orders wheneverpossible. If money is sent it ought to be in a regis-tered letter. Cheques and money-orders need to bemade payable to The Christian Herald. Makingthem payable to individuals usually creates hold-up. New subscripUotis might start any time. Whensubscri

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Picture from web page 574 of “The spiritual denominations in the USA: their background, teaching, government and also stats. With an initial illustration of Judaism, paganism as well as Mohammedanism” (1854)
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< img alt=" rebuild credit report" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/14777245132_c0d73064aa.jpg" width=" 400"/ > Image by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14777245132" > Web Archive Publication Images Identifier: religiousdenomin00belc. Title: The religious religions in the United States: their background, teaching, government and also stats. With an initial sketch of Judaism, paganism and Mohammedanism Year:< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1854" > 1854(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1850" > 1850s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorBelcher__Joseph__1794_1859" > Belcher, Joseph, 1794-1859 Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectSects" > Sects< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectSects" > Sects< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectReligions" > Religions Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherPhiladelphia__J__E__Potter" > Philly, J. E. Potter Adding Collection:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorThe_Library_of_Congress" > The Collection of Congress Digitizing Sponsor:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorThe_Library_of_Congress" > The Collection of Congress View Book Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/religiousdenomin00belc/religiousdenomin00belc#page/n574/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Audience About This Publication:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/religiousdenomin00belc" rel=" nofollow" > Magazine Access Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidreligiousdenomin00belc" > All Photos From Publication Visit this site to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/religiousdenomin00belc/religiousdenomin00belc#page/n574/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view book online to see this picture in context in a browseable online variation of this publication. Text
Appearing Prior to Image: debt ofthese very early Methodists, it ought to be pointed out that this

collection ofbooks was started in the year 1792, and was formerly situated inthe old parsonage. The instance is deserving the imitation of all spiritual Methodist Episcopal Church. 565 cultures. Right here, also, was put tlje old clock of Wesley Chapel, which still tells the hours of the refuge as it has noted the flightof numerous annual rounds after that consecrated place. This 2nd residence stood for concerning twenty-four years, when it wasresolved to reconstruct it with 2 brick houses, one on each side, as asource of revenue. The inscription is a very exceptional sight of thewhole. In its outside appearance the Church is straightforward, plain, andneat– the within lovely as well as wide, with a pulpit in a semi-circular recess– measurements, forty-two feet by eighty. The basementis over ground; it is a remarkable space for spiritual conferences, andhere may be seen the only relics of old John-street Church– its vener-able clock as well as collection. Text Showing up After Image: Third John-street Church. There are two tablet computers ahead, with these engravings:– This Church, The initial erected by the Methodist Society in The U.S.A., Was Developed 1768. Rebuilt, 1817. According to this time around it shall be claimed, What hath God functioned?( Numbers xxiii.) The First Methodist Episcopal Church. Rebuilt, A. D. 1841. This is my remainder for life: here will I stay. (Ps. cxxxii.) 566 Methodists. Before this period Wesley had passed to his benefit, exclaimingin fatality, The most effective of all is God is with us. His individuals anywhere grieved his elimination, yet was glad in the ongoing life of hisinfinite Master. They were obliged to earn initiatives to which theyhad not been accustomed; yet no where in the world were the Metho-dists much better gotten ready for the contingency than in the United States. It is a remarkable reality, and worth recording, that although whenWesley Church was very first started its participants were compelled to solicitaid from Mr. Wesley to complete it, their followers possess today beloved- Note Regarding Images Please keep in mind that these images are removed from scanned page pictures that might have been digitally improved for readability- pigmentation as well as look of these illustrations could not completely look like the original work.

Picture from web page 965 of “Message Workplace Edinburgh as well as Leith directory” (1846).

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Image from page 965 of “Post Office Edinburgh and Leith directory” (1846)
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Identifier: postofficeedinbu187980edin
Title: Post Office Edinburgh and Leith directory
Year: 1846 (1840s)
Authors: Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directory Limited
Subjects:
Publisher: Edinburgh : Postmaster General
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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o theSuperintendent, at the School, 14 Lochend Eoad, Leith, will receive immediate attention. Newspapers.—Large and Small Quantities toPurchase for Cash. Waste Paper. — Wanted to Purchase, forEe-Manufacturing, Old Ledgers, Day Books,Letters, Old Newspapers, Session Papers, andEvery Description of Written and Printed. TheHighest Price given, and the whole sent out of theKingdom.—Apply by Letter or Personally to GILBERT ADCOCK & SONS, 11 SOUTH ST. ANDEEW STREET,EDINBURGH. THE ACCOMMODATION LOAN CO., 21 ST. JOHN STREET. MONEY advanced on PERSONAL SE-, CURITY, in sums from £1 to £100,repayable by Weekly Instalments. For Forms of Proposal, apply toJOHN MACKIE, Manager and House-Agent. JOHN MACKIE, Junr., Pouse anb |ns«rana %^nxi, 21 ST. JOHN STREET, EDINBURGH, HOUSE—EOTAL PAEK TEEEACE, Agent for the Economic Life. Imperial Fire, and Glasgow Plate-Glass hisicrance Companies. 186 EDINBURGH AND LEITH EAST POWDERHALL, BROUGHTON ROAD. EDINBURGH. LICENSED AS PER ACT OF PARLIAMENT.

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o 1^ M« CD o — 03 riREWOMS FOR PRIVATE km PUBLIC DISPLAYS (to Order), I^^ all their Beauty and Dazzling BHUianey. BOTTLES WANTED to Purchase for Cash. HighestPrice given for Old Champagnes,Brandy, Beer, Claret, Hocks, and others. Lifted in Town or Country by ROBERT STENHOUSE, 84 ROSE STREET. THOS. S. STEVENS, WINE AND SPIRIT MERCHANT {THE BUNCH OF GRAPES), HIGH STREET, PORTOBELLO. HOT AND COLD LUNCHEONS.LIQUORS OF THE FINEST QUALITY. FAMILIES SUPPLIED. ESTABLISHED UPWARDS OF FORTY YEARS. JAMES WILLIAMSON, PAWNBROKER,98 ROSE STREET, EDINBURGH. MONEY advanced to any amount on SILVER PLATE, WATCHES, JEWELLERY, NAPERY,APPAREL, and other Moveable Property. SALE-ROOM ON PREMISES. POST-OFFICE DIRECTORY ADVERTISER. 187 Equitable Loan Company of Scotland, No. 4 MILNE SQUARE. ENTRANCES:42 NORTH BRIDGE AND 173 HIGH STREET. CAPITAL, £75,000. IITSTITUTED 1824. GEORGE RUSSELL, Manager and Sole Acting Partner. ^pHIS COMPANY advances Money on Loan upon Silver Plate, Watches, Jewels, Soft L and Pi

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Image from page 11 of “1846 semi-centennial compendium of historical facts : business and political index of Manchester, N.H.” (1896)
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Identifier: 1846semicentenni00chal
Title: 1846 semi-centennial compendium of historical facts : business and political index of Manchester, N.H.
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Challis, Frank H
Subjects: Manchester (N.H.) — History Manchester (N.H.) — Directories
Publisher: [Manchester, N.H : F.H. Challis]
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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une, 1810,succeeding The Proprietors of the Amoskeag Cotton and Wool Factory which was organized Jan. 31, 1810. Amoskeag Manufacturing Company incorporated 1831. Andrew, B. S., elected principal of Webster-street school, March 29, 1889. Ankarloo, John P., one of earliest Swedish residents, died May 21, 1894,aged 71. Anniversary, one hundredth, of town celebrated Oct. 22, 1851, Address byRev. C. W. Wallace, poem by William Stark. loel7lers CONFECTIONERY STORE ..Ice Cream and Lunch Parlors.. Trv our celebrated Home-made and Cream Bread; also manufacturer of Cakes,Pies and Hot Tea Rolls, fresh dailv. We make a specialty of supplies for Wed-dings, Church Parties, Societies, vSuppers and Picnics. We also manufacture freshdailJ^Finest Confectionery, Chocolates, Bon-Bons and other specialties of sweets.Try our Soda, also Ice Cream at wholesale and retail. Cafe connected. 977 ELM STREET, MANCHESTER, N. H. 4®=Agents for Tenneys, Maillards, Bakers, Fine Candies.Special prices on large orders.

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143 HANOVER ST,. ^^ telephone connection. Half-tone Cut made, by Electric Light in 12 hours. When in need of Cutsfor any purpose, call at 143 Hanover St., 3d Floor, Manchester, N. H. H. t BOfID…. Real Estate Broker Real Estate Bought, Sold and Exchanged on Commission, Mortgages Negotiated on improved City Real Estate. Money Loaned on Personal Property and all kinds ofCollateral Security 340 and 342, The Kennard, MMNGHESTER, M. H. R. L.. WAL.L.ACe & CO., praetieal • ^mbalmers • apd . tlpdertal^ers HANOVER STREET. 5tore I^euer go$ed. Cady /^ssistaQt. Jelepl^OQe 217-2 F. L. WALLACE. A. G. FAIRBANKS. seosoiioo Bread is so podoh we com soppiv iiie oemood. liaocnesier leo Co.1896 FmBUZ/AUY 1896 Sujr. Mon: Tue,. Wed. 7nu. Tj^i Sat. Last Quarter New Moon First Quarter Full Moon ^ ^ 5th 13th 21st 28th ^ <^ # 2 3 4 S 6 Z S 9 10 // /a IS 14 IS 16 n 18 m 20 2/ 22 23 24 23 26 2Z 28 29 HISTORICAL COMPENDIUM—C^;//mz^drt. Anniversary, 50th, of first newspaper celebrated Nov. 16, 1889.

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Image from page 188 of “A personal history of Ulysses S. Grant, and sketch of Schuyler Colfax” (1868)
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Identifier: personalhistoryo00rich
Title: A personal history of Ulysses S. Grant, and sketch of Schuyler Colfax
Year: 1868 (1860s)
Authors: Richardson, Albert D. (Albert Deane), 1833-1869
Subjects: Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885 Colfax, Schuyler, 1823-1885
Publisher: Hartford, Conn., American Publishing Company San Francisco, Cal., R. J. Trumbull & Co.
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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oney loaned on Real Estate security.v Boggs, who had a good many houses to rent, and a goodmany tenants to collect of, inducted his new partner into thebusiness by taking him about town and introducing himto all the leading customers. Then, at the suggestion ofColonel Dent, he left Grant to look after the business whilehe visited Philadelphia, where, as a young man, he hadresided for many years and formed acquaintances amongwealthy citizens. Money in Philadelphia was worth butfive or six per cent., while in St. Louis ten per cent, waslegal interest and fifteen often the current rate. He succeeded in effecting an arrangement with one capi-talist in Philadelphia and another in New York to let the firmhave four hundred thousand dollars at eight per cent., toloan out in small sums secured on real estate. Returning toSt. Louis early in March, in excellent spirits, he advertisedthat Boggs & Grant were ready to advance money on realestate at ten per cent., the borrower paying the two per

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PUBLIC LIBRARY, A«™K, (.ENOX ANDTLOEN FOUNDATIONS. 1859] Suffers fkom Ague and Rheumatism. 161 cent, additional to cover expenses of examining titles andnegotiating the loan. Like all advertisements which offer money instead ofasking it, this brought hundreds of applicants, but thefirm rejected some as unsafe, and the attorneys of the East-ern capitalists—who, it was agreed, must be satisfied withthe securities—refused to accept others. The end of thepromising scheme was that Boggs & Grant made aboutenough out of it to pay the expenses of the senior partnerseastern trip. The captain engaged in the new business with all hisenergy, though incapacitated somewhat for the first fourmonths by ague and rheumatism which he brought fromHardscrabble. Often, during the spring afternoons, hischill would come on, and so weaken him that McClellanor Hillyer had to support him to the Third Street omnibus,by which he rode homeward. Boggs, on his return, found that Grant had diligentlycollec

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Image from page 376 of “The chiefs of Grant. Memoirs (Communication. – Charters.) [With dishes, including portraits and facsimiles, and genealogical tables.]” (1883)

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Image from web page 376 of “The chiefs of Grant. Memoirs (Correspondence. – Charters.) [With plates, including portraits and facsimiles, and genealogical tables.]” (1883)
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Identifier: chiefsofgrantmv100fras
Title: The chiefs of Grant. Memoirs (Correspondence. – Charters.) [With plates, including portraits and facsimiles, and genealogical tables.]
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Writers: Fraser, William, Sir, 1816-1898
Subjects:
Publisher: Edinburgh
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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barony of Freuchie, andWester Tulloch, utilizing the places of Mulben and others in barony ofRothes. Caused by this arrangement had been that James Grant obtainedthe only management of the estates. But, at their entry upon them, theywere encumbered with big debts, also with all the provisions toward twodowagers, for woman Lilias Murray ended up being still alive.2 The witnesses to the arrangement between James Grant and hismother had been George Earl of Seaforth, James Lord Deskford, ThomasMKenzie of Pluscardine, Sir Robert Innes of Balveny, James Sutherland,Tutor of Duffus, and John Grant of Moyness, and these appear tohave appended their signatures not only as formal witnesses to thedue execution of this deed of arrangement, but to own been present asthe younger Lairds council of guidance. For their names may also be addedthat of John give, the younger of Ballindalloch. There is no record of 1 first Letter at Castle Grant. 2 Extract Discharge and Renunciation, dated at Freuchie, 11th might 1637, ibid.

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■■■■,

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Image from page 8 of “The liberator” (1831)
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Identifier: liberator186232126garr
Title: The liberator
12 Months: 1831 (1830s)
Writers: Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879 Yerrinton, James Brown, 1800-1866
Topics: Antislavery movements
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : William Lloyd Garrison and Isaac Knapp
Adding Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Associates of the Boston Public Library / The Boston Foundation

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naolmus (o as.-i.-l, the woman in decreasing lifes toilsomeask.—JtoWoW Qmxttttj July i.- .«J HE we, we T? E II A T O R — IS VtillUSHKl) — EVEEY FRIDAY MOBNING, — AT— 221 WASHINGTON STRKET, BOOM. No. G. ROBERT F. WALLCUT, Gkxkral Agent. II2F TERMS — Two dollars and lifty dollars per an mini,in advance. jiQpFive copies will bo delivered to ono target for tenDOLLARS, if payment be made beforehand. £gT All remittances tend to be to bo made, and all letters re-lating towards the pecuniary problems of tbe paper arc to budirected (post-paid) toward General Agent. Et^ commercials inserted at rato of five cents perline. g5f The Agents regarding the American, Massachusetts, Penn-sylvania, Ohio and Michigan Anti-Slavery Societies areauthorised to get subscriptions for LniiiiiATOit. (TJ?~ These men constitute the FinancialOmmiittec, but are perhaps not in charge of any debts of thepaper, viz :—Fuascis Jackso.v, Eumuxd Qdincy, EdmkxdJackson, and Wk.vdell Phillips. WM. LLOYD GARRISON, Editor.

Text Appearing After-image:
Proclaim Libsrty throughout all tb.3 land, to r,llthe residents thereof. I set tins down while the legislation of nations. We say that mil-itary authority takes, for tho time, the area of most munic-ipal institutions, and SLAVERY ONE OF THE RESTSund that, under that condition of things, up to now from the beingtrue that tho States where slavery exists have tho exclusive*management of tho subject, not only tho Phebident orthe Lsiteij States, but tho UOMHAITDEB for the Anvr,HAS POWER TO PURCHASE THE UNIVERSAL EMAN-CIPATION OF SLAVES From the immediate your slaveholding States get to be the theater of a war,civil, servile, or international, from that instant the war powersof Congress extend to interference with the organization ofslavery, atlanta divorce attorneys way in which it could be interferedwith, from a claim of indemnity for slaves taken or de-stroyed, to your cession of shows, burdened with slaver;-, toa international power. … its a war power. I state it is a warpower ; when your country is in fact in war, whetherit bo a

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Image from page 193 of “Newfoundland at the beginning of the 20th century : a treatise of history and development” (1902)
debt management
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Identifier: newfoundlandatbe00harv
Title: Newfoundland at the start of the twentieth century : a treatise of history and development
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Harvey, M. (Moses), 1820-1901
Topics: George V, King of good Britain, 1865-1936
Publisher: New York : The South Publishing Co.
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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h itbrings, these lands need remained valueless indefinitely.These land funds, it should be noticed, are acknowledged by Mr.Reid instead of a yearly subsidy in money as payment foroperating the line the very first term of years when of necessitythe revenue from passenger and goods traffic should be small.The colony therefore escapes the hefty cost of operating the line atfirst because of the concession of the places which are entirelyunprofitable. Moreover, Mr. Reid engages to sell their lands atthirty dollars an acre—the Government annoyed cost to all bonafide settlers. Various other advantages will be the conveyance of mails three timesa few days in the place of fortnightly as previously, with a rise ofbusiness. The connection at North Sydney using Americanrailway system opens up a desirable route for tourists and travelers,and gives a fast path of transportation for goods. That a smallcolony, certainly not wealthy, has actually discovered these types of nature andenergy concerning undertake and carry out such an enterprise and 172 NEWFOUNDLAND.

Text Appearing After-image:
Placentia. in order to make provision for repayment of interest on its expense iscertainly significantly to its credit; which is today rather specific thatit can shoulder the burden of debt incurred by its constructionwithout any undue strain. Before the great innovator, therailway, old things will pass away and a unique and much better socialand professional life will begin. In 1898 the us government entered into a new agreement withMr. Reid, that has been ratified by the Legislature, the balance beingpassed by a formidable majority. In accordance with this newagreement Mr. Reid undertakes to work all railways forfifty many years, stringent problems concerning management, quantity oftrains, prices, etc., becoming laid down. For reversion regarding the NEWFOUNDLAND. 173 railway after fifty many years he agrees to cover ,000,000within a year. Hence the colony is forever relieved of theheavy expense of running the railway which for a lot of yearswould usually be a drain in the revenue. The main benefitof the railroad is the setting up of t

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Image from web page 64 of “Brochure” (1893).

A couple of great personal bankruptcy pictures I found:

Picture from web page 64 of “Brochure” (1893)
personal bankruptcy
< img alt=" individual insolvency" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/14597592920_2ab495f0b5.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Picture by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14597592920"
> Net Archive Book Images Identifier:
catalogue191920nort Title: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidcatalogue191920nort" > Brochure Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1893" > 1893(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1890" > 1890s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorNorth_Georgia_College" > North Georgia University Topics:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectNorth_Georgia_College" > North Georgia College Author:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherDahlonega__Ga____North_Georgia_College" > Dahlonega, Ga.: North Georgia College Adding Library:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorUniversity_of_Illinois_Urbana_Champaign" > University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorUniversity_of_Illinois_Urbana_Champaign" > College of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Sight Publication Page: Publication Customer About This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/catalogue191920nort" rel=" nofollow" > Magazine Entrance Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidcatalogue191920nort" > All Images From Publication Click right here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/catalogue191920nort/catalogue191920nort#page/n64/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > sight book online to see this picture in context in a browseable online version of this publication. Text Appearing Before Image: 4 periods weekly. Sophomore. Business 3 and also 3a.– Audit, Concept as well as

Method. Pre-requisite:
Company 2 as well as Company 2a. A continuation of Service la. The field covered willinclude: The corporation; voucher system; factory expense; basic principles of valuation; devaluation, its causes, techniques of determining and taping; money and also mercantilecredits. Sophomore, very first as well as second terms, 3 hours each week. Organisation 4 and also 4a.– Audit Laboratory. Comprising a comprehensive collection showing corporation ac-counting. Sufficient technique is given up the use of thecolumnur cash money journal and the use of the different subsidiary-ledgers. Independent accounting troubles dealing withcorporations are given throughout the year. Sophomore, very first as well as 2nd term, six durations each week. Service 5 and also 5a.– Organisation Regulation. The purpose is to outline the assisting principles of legislation asrelated to normal commercial as well as monetary transactions.Among the subjects talked about will be: Agreements, sales, 48 Text Showing up After Picture: agency, negotiable instruments, insurance, employment, partnerships,

firms, personal effects, real home, bankruptcy, tax, and arbitration. Pierce in the analysisof instances as well as the draughting of legal types will certainly develop an im-portant part of the course. 2 periods weekly throughout the year. Junior. Organisation 7 and also 7a.– Advanced Accountancy. Prerequisite: Organisation 3a and Company 4a. This job resembles Business 3a as well as covers: Invest-ments; equipment, losing as well as abstract properties; present, contingent as well as set responsibilities; funding stock as well as its valua-tion; earnings, surpluses as well as gets; rewards; liquidationof a corporation, combinations and also loan consolidations; branchhouse accounting, and combined annual report. First as well as 2nd terms Junior year, two durations perweek. Organisation 8 and also 8a.– Expense Bookkeeping. Prerequisite: Busi-ness 3a and Organisation 4a. The conversation will certainly cover the concepts and generalmethods of price finding; the methods of distributing indi-rect expenditure Keep in mind About Images Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned web page images that might have been digitally improved for readability- coloration and also appearance of these illustrations might not flawlessly look like the original job. Picture from web page 1057 of” Electric train journal”( 1908)< img alt=" personal insolvency" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/14757058184_e0c4af1156.jpg "size=" 400"/ >
personal bankruptcy
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< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14757058184 "> Internet Archive Publication Images
Identifier: electricrailway541919newy Title
: < a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidelectricrailway541919newy" > Electric train journal Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1908" > 1908(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1900" > 1900s) Writers:. Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectElectric_railroads" > Electric railways Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_New_York__McGraw_Hill_Pub__Co" > [New york city] McGraw Hill Bar. Carbon monoxide Contributing Library:< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorSmithsonian_Libraries" > Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorSmithsonian_Libraries ” > Smithsonian Libraries

Sight Book Page: < a href=" https://archive.org/stream/electricrailway541919newy/electricrailway541919newy#page/n1057/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow
” > Book Viewer Concerning This Publication:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/electricrailway541919newy" rel=" nofollow" > Directory Access Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidelectricrailway541919newy" > All Photos From Publication Click right here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/electricrailway541919newy/electricrailway541919newy#page/n1057/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow "> sight book online to see this image in context in a browseable online variationof this book. Text Showing up Prior to Image: first to last there was a yearly loss rang-ing between,000 as well as,000. This loss Mr. Joycecontinued to pay from his private and individual funds.He also spent for numerous years the bond passion on the,000 of bonds, as it dropped due, along with the taxeson the home. At initial flush this might appear somewhat of a uniqueproceeding, yet I know of two various other lines in Ohio forwhich men staying in other states have actually acted in likemanner. The mental process is something likethis. At initially there is a hope that things might change.It is like a bettor playing his risk. He runs the risk of hisall, and afterwards he borrows. That is simply what the males STATEMENT OF PROFITS As Well As RUNNING EXPENSES Years Revenues Costs Loss Profit 1906,538,451,913 1907 18,287 29,418 11,131 1908 16,232 35,818 19,586 1909 16,889 27,587 11,698 1910 18,692 26,659 7,867 1911 18,240 33,547 15,307 1912 23,791 24,516 725 1913 26,856 21,159,697 1914 25,967 23,249.,718 1915 23,743 22,453 1,290 1916 26,931 25,562 1,369

Text Appearing After Picture:
backing some of these roadways do. Lastly, temporarily, they go on due to the fact that there appears no method out. To give a suggestion of the profits and also expenses onthe Brovm line from the moment the building accountwas closed, as much as the moment that the road was marketed tobe dismantled, a compressed summary is provided. It shouldbe remembered that the expenditure column does not in-clude devaluation, taxes neither bond rate of interest. In 1912 and 1913, a combinations in between twoneighboring lines was impacted. Both these lines wereon the edge of insolvency. Burdened by interestcharges, interfered with by bad construction and handi-capped by inefficient, low-cost monitoring, the annualshowing had actually ended up being so bad that the proprietors werediscouraged. Making a Negative Mess Worse Gripping at a straw, Mr. Lytle, burdened with hisshare of responsibility engendered by his Brown line, fantasized of a way out by integrating his line withthese two insolvent lines. That 3 ciphers addedtogether can never ever make an integer, he cannot see.He encourage

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Image from web page 195 of “Viewers for coming Americans;” (1910)
personal bankruptcy
< img alt=" individual insolvency" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/14743458896_6366fc7897.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Picture by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14743458896" > Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: readerforcominga00robe.
Title: < a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidreaderforcominga00robe" > Reader for coming Americans; Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1910" > 1910 (< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1910" > 1910s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorRoberts__Peter__1859_1932" > Roberts, Peter, 1859-1932 Topics:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectRecitations" > Recountings Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherNew_York__Young_men_s_Christian_association_press" > New York, Boy’s Christian organization press Adding Library:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorThe_Library_of_Congress" > The Collection of Congress Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorThe_Library_of_Congress" > The Collection of Congress View Publication Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/readerforcominga00robe/readerforcominga00robe#page/n195/mode/1up" rel =" nofollow ” >
PublicationVisitor Concerning This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/readerforcominga00robe" rel=" nofollow" > Magazine Entrance View All Images:< a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidreaderforcominga00robe" > All Photos From Book Click on this link to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/readerforcominga00robe/readerforcominga00robe#page/n195/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view book online to see this picture in context in a browseable online
version of this book. Text Appearing Before Picture: the citizens in the United States.It might

be well to discuss the original plan of
choosingpresidential electors and also just how individuals now pick thePresident. Comparison the powers of the Head of state of the UnitedStates with those of the King of England or the Czarof Russia. Inform exactly how the choice of Head of state and also Vice-Presidentmay degenerate after Congress. Show the class a tally used for the presidentialelection. Describe the representation. Program the relationship of the Head of state to members of hiscabinet, who are guys of his personal selection. It wouldincrease the rate of interest if an instructor can reveal photos ofthese guys as well as discuss their names. XIX. THE STATES AND THE NATION Forty-six States now develop the Federal Union– theUnited States of America. The Constitution guar-antees to every State a republican kind of govern-ment as well as the Federal authorities apply the provi-sions of the Constitution as well as monitor the generalaffairs of the commonwealth. Therefore no State canenter right into arrangement with another State or make a Text Appearing After Photo: REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENTQUAKANTLED LESSONS IN GOVERNMENT 191 treaty with an international
power. No State could engagein battle conserve in situation of actual invasion and could not keepa army or naval force without consent of Congress.No State could approve titles of nobility, coin money ormake anything but the gold and also silver coin of theUnited States a lawful tender. It could not pass lawsimpairing the responsibilities of contracts. These limi-tations are enforced by Congress as well as the Constitutionof the USA. Congress also develops a consistent guideline of naturali-zation and also uniform bankruptcy regulations. Congress ex-ercises direct control over the Area of Columbiaand over all territory not yet arranged right into Statesand admitted to the Union; additionally over all fts, arse-nals, dockyards and other structures possessed by it inthe several States and also over the various nationwide reser-vations in different components of the country. Congresshas the right to enforce duties and also import taxes however thesemust be uniform throughout the matter Keep in mind About Photos Please keep in mind that these photos are drawn out from checked page pictures that may have been digitally enhanced for readability -coloration as well as appearance of these images might not completelylook like the initial work.

Image from page 84 of “The Southern States” (1893)

A few nice new car loan images I found:

Image from page 84 of “The Southern States” (1893)
new car loan
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Identifier: southernstates1893balt
Title: The Southern States
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Agriculture Industries
Publisher: Baltimore, Manufacturers’ Record Pub. Co
Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina, Government & Heritage Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation

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Pen sketches of Georgia cities. JIl,000,000 of manufactured jiroducf, nmlfertilizer works whose product is wortlifi,000,000 per annum. The business infertilizers runs close up to 12,000,000. Thereare two large ice factories, and another is incourse of erection. Beyond these there arelarge iron foundries, car shops, flour and gristmills and many smaller industries. Augusta sells 275,000 bales of cotton andconsumes in her own mills 80,000 bales, raisingprices by her home competition for the staple,and thus always furnishing a steady rivalbuyer in her own home demand. Englishbuyers come to the Augusta market, increas-ing her importance.

Text Appearing After Image:
COMMERCIAL CLUB, AUGUSTA, GA. Augusta has eight hunks, with a capital andsurplus of ,750,000, a deposit account of,000,000, and a total of loans and discountsof ,500,000. The Georgia Railroad Bank isthe continuation of the old powerful GeorgiaRailroad & Banking Co., and has all thesolidity and strength of the parent institution.The banking house of Fleming, Thomas & Co.is one of the younger financial institutions ofthe city that has gained a strong hold, andexemplifies the best financial talent of theplace. In addition to the vast water power on theSavannah river above Augusta, estimated at400,000 horse power, nearly equalling that of New England, her famous canal of sevenmiles length, eleven feet deep, 150 feet wideat surface and 106 feet at bottom, begun in1845, completed in 1847 and enlarged in 1871,costing,500,000, furnishes the city with aiupieand convenient water power, besides waterway for large flatboats from the upcountry.On the canal 7400 horse power are in u

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Image from page 109 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)

A few nice annual credit report images I found:

Image from page 109 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
annual credit report
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19192mass
Title: Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Annual report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Public utilities
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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, …. Other yard employees, …… Fuel for yard locomotives, …… Other yard expenses, ……. Injuries to persons, ……. Loss and damage, ……. Other rail transportation expenses, …. Total transportation, rail line. Administration,Valuation expenses.Other general expenses. General. Total general expenses, Grand Total Railway Operating Expenses, ,387 05 28,342 01 893 82 612 29 4,228 05 1,722 73 3,380 47t ,805 48 ,368 33 833 64 1 03 1,722 79 464 361 ,461 43 0 88 ,965 06 3,905 27 14,090 23 24,367 42 8,433 59 1,201 62 1,722 75 71 41 453 91 ,211 26 ,738 101,032 202,273 65 ,043 95 6,683 00 t Credit.Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 10L37 per cent. 78 RAILROAD RETURNS. [Jan. Description of Railroad owned and operated. Railroad owned.Length of main line, ….Length of side track, etc Total Length of Track owned, . Railroad operated.Length of main line, …. Length of side track, etc., …. Total Length of Track operated,

Text Appearing After Image:
1920.1 GRAFTON & UPTON. 79 RETURN GRAFTON & UPTON RAILROAD COMPANY For the Year ending December 31, 1919. Directors. r- -■ N.vME OF Director. Office Address. Date ofBeginningof Term. Date ofExpirationof Term. George A. Draper,Eben D. Bancroft, .Frank J. Dutcher,George W. Knowlton,Edw. P. Usher, Hopedale, Mass., .Hopedale, Mass., .Hopedale, Mass., .West Upton, Mass.,Grafton, Mass., Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919 Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920 Principal General Officers. Title of Gener.4.l Officer. Name of Person holding Officeat Close of Year. Office Address. President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Gen. Mgr. and Gen. Supt.,General Counsel George A. Draper Eben D. Pancroft Frank J. Dutcher, …. Harry A. Billings Wendell Williams Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Milford, Mass. Comparative General Balance Sheet — Asset Side. . , Balance at Beginning of Year. Item. Balance

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Image from page 61 of “Annual catalogue of the Indiana Normal School of Pennsylvania” (1907)
annual credit report
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Identifier: annualcatalogueo1907indi
Title: Annual catalogue of the Indiana Normal School of Pennsylvania
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Indiana State Normal School (Indiana, Pa.)
Subjects: Indiana State Normal School (Indiana, Pa.) Curricula Catalogs.
Publisher: Indiana State Normal School (Indiana, Pa.)
Contributing Library: Indiana University of Pennsylvania Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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student to a ticket of admission to all athletic events, the course of universityextension lectures and all other lectures under the auspices of the school. Bills for board cuid tuition arc /^ayablc. one-half at the opcniiii::;. and flu- re-mainder at the middle of tlie term. State aid is not credited before the endof the term. Bank Drafts, Checks. Express and P. O. Orders are accepted. Paymentsmust be made, or satisfactorily provided for. before students are assigned toclasses. Students desiring to leave school before the close of the term must report tothe Principal and settle any unpaid accounts : and in all cases bills for board andtuition will be made out for the entire term unless notice of leaving is given atthe time of leaving, or (in case this is impossible) immediately thereafter. Visitors expecting to remain more than three days are requested to makearrangements in advance with the Principal. JII bills are f^ayable to the Principal. oo prN^JSVLVA^4,^ ^JATe: ^Hf NORMA^SCHOOL

Text Appearing After Image:
9 d TEXT BOOKS Stationery and text books used in the Institution can be purchased at thebook room in the main building at regular prices; or the text books can berented at reasonable rates by those who do not wish to purchase. The fol-lowing is the list in use : Astronomy—Todd.Botany—Bergen. Plant Dissection—Arthur, Brown and Coulter.Business: Book-keeping—Goodyear. Commercial Law—Powers and Lyons. Shorthand—Ben Pitman. Typewriting—an Sant (Touch).Chemistry—Remsen. Laboratory Maimal—Remsen. Qualitative Analysis—Irish. Quantitative Analysis—Evans. Civil Government—Andrews, Shimmell.English : Composition and Rlietoric—Longwood and Emerson. Composition and Rhetoric—Damon and Herrick. Evolution of Expression. .56

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Image from page 160 of “Report” (1866)
annual credit report
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Identifier: report1915mary
Title: Report
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Maryland. State Board of Education
Subjects: Education
Publisher: Annapolis [etc.]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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ve to fourteen dollars. Students who pursued thereview courses only, were exempt of all fees except the registration,fee of five dollars. A total of forty-eight regularly scheduled and five special courseswere given during the session. This is an increase of thirty-five inthe total number of courses offered in the Summer Session. With theexception of the work in elementary agriculture, the courses in theCollege of Agriculture are the same as those given during the regularcollege year. The large number of courses offered makes it possible forthe student to select those subjects best adapted to the needs of his orher particular community. On account of the field work that may bedone, many of these courses may be pursued with better advantageduring the summer than during the regular college year. For the convenience of the student the courses were divided intothree groups. Group I consisted of Elementary School subjects, andincluded courses in Rural Elementary School Methods, Arithmetic,

Text Appearing After Image:
Annual Report op the State Board of Education 145 English, Physiology, and Hygiene, and United States History. GroupII was composed of Elementary Science and Vocational subjects, andincluded courses in Elementary Agriculture, Shop Work, FreehandDrawing, Handicraft, Domestic Science and Art, Biology, Algebra,Plane Geometry and School Library Economy. Group III constitutedthe college credit courses. The work in Group I was intended especi-ally for teachers and prospective teachers who were effected by thenew Minimum Training Law passed by the last Legislature. Withthe exception of the work in Elementary School Methods these coursesaimed chiefly to strengthen the student in the subject matter and con-sequently contained only a minimum of the theory of teaching them. It was the policy of a large number of students to pursue from oneto two courses that would strengthen them directly in their schoolwork for the ensuing year, and to fill out their schedule from thecollege credit group of stu

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Image from web page 58 of “Industries of to-day” (1904)

Some good dismal credit images I found:

Image from page 58 of “Industries of to-day” (1904)
poor credit
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Identifier: industriesoftoda00lane
Title: Industries of to-day
12 Months: 1904 (1900s)
Writers: Lane, Martha Luther, b. 1862
Subjects: Manufactures Occupations
Publisher: Boston, Ginn & organization
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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eteran picker is shownin the accompanying illustration. [48] A Crop of Cranberries Cranberries are not selected like strawberries,daintily and something by one. Experienced workersplunge your hands under the vines, palms upwardand hands curved, and literally scoop up the fruitby handfuls. A rake, makes it possible for the vines topass through its teeth and maintains the berries, isalso made use of, but is far lesssatisfactory than handlabor. Whenever a measure is filledand emptied the book-keeper standing near givesthe picker credit in hisaccount, though tally issometimes kept by meansof passes, all of whichrepresents a measure and a Veteran can be exchanged within store for tea, sugar,or various other commodities. The most common cost paid isten cents a measure, in addition to laborers, like thosein other occupations, are occasionally discontented. A couple of years ago a strike for higher wagesoccurred on a large marsh where there werefive hundred pickers. Fifty of those, preferringa half-loaf to no breads, held meekly on with their [49]

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Industries of To-Day just work at the old price, and, unfortunate to link, themalcontents, perched easily regarding the dikesas a vantage ground, pelted these with a showerof sticks and rocks. Harmony was finallyrestored and* the strikers returned to get results,but, together old lady among them declared, theylooked thereafter upon the fifty employees as poor-spirited creatures. Definitely, because they work because of the job, there isno potential for cheating, said a visitor to a shrewdproprietor. He looked skeptical. We inform you, he stated, cranberry pickets basically like all the remainder of theworld. Some wouldnt just take a berry to save theirlives, as well as others lie awake nights to imagine howto fill-up their measures. Some will slyly just take a measure and dentin the base, and others have a way of givingthe actions a-shake to be able to toss the berriesup and make five quarts look like six. Humannature is great human on a cranberry bog! Berry selecting has its own champion workers, someof who average over 200 quarts aday, and there

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Image from page 341 of “Fables” (1757)
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Identifier: fables__01gayjuoft
Title: Fables
12 Months: 1757 (1750s)
Writers: Gay, John, 1685-1732
Topics: Fables
Publisher: London C. Hitch
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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lit to his part l>c fitted. Tile Swan, fays he, in hands ihall (LineThe foldicrs marvelous toil be thine.The CiKk lliall mighty wealth attain : get, feek it from the llormy primary. The court ihall function as the Spiders fphertj Pgwr, fortune, ihall reward him there. In -516 PyJ B L E S. In mufics art the Afss fameShall emulate Corellis name. Each took the part that he advisd.And all had been similarly defpisd.A Farmer, at his folly movd.The lifeless preceptor therefore reprovd. Blockhead, fays he, by what youve done.One would have thought em each your fon;For parents, with their offspring blind,Confult nor parts nor change of brain -,But evn in infancy decreeWhat this, exactly what tother fon fliall be.Had judgment weighd the cafe.Their genius therefore had fixd their particular place:The Swan had learnt the failors art;The Cock had playd the foldiers component; The T A-B L E !^. 317 The Spitlcr when you look at the weavers tradeNnil credit had a king’s ransom made ;But tor the luol in evVy clafsThe blockhead had appeard an Afi. ^m>^^ FABLE 38 FABLES.

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{xra^eirtvn FABLE XV. ^he CooK-MAiDj the Turnspit, together with Ox. To a Poor guy.^^Onfider man in evry fphere; Then tell me, is your great deal Icvere ?Tis murmur, difcontent, diftruft,which makes you wretched. Jesus is juft. We grant F yi n r. K .V. we give that appetite miift l)c fcJ,That toil t(X3 earns thy everyday loaves of bread.What after that – thy desires tend to be feen and knownBut evr) mortal feels his own.Were lx)rn a reftlefs needy staff:Show mc the happier guy than you.Adam, thoiii^h blcli above his type,For choose of focial woman pind :Eves wants the fubtle ferpent law;I ler fickle tafte tranfgrcfi.d what the law states:Thu^ Icll our fires; and their particular difgra<.cThe curfc entaild on people. hen Philips fon, by glor) led,Had oer the world their empire fpread;whenever altars to their name were drcli,That he was man his tears confcft. Tlic hopes of avarice tend to be chcckt;The proud guy constantly wants rcf^xrct. Mut 320 FA B L E S. Wliat numerous wishes on powr attend ? Aspiration never ever gains its end. Whom hath not heard the wealthy complain Of fu

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Image from web page 147 of “the road railroad analysis” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev15amer
Title: The street railroad review
12 Months: 1891 (1890s)
Writers: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Topics: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Assessment Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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e, consequently, of die merit and demerit record, as thiscompany keeps it, is always to separate among the list of great males instead thanamong poor people ones, since this is shown by their particular individual recordson which look credit balances of merits. 128 STREET RAILWAY EVALUATION. [Vol. XV, No. 2. Miller Anchors. The accompanying illustration is of the Miller anchor forrailway wrecking functions, and auger for establishing them.These anchors could be emerge from 30 to 40 mins, eight feet deep,and will stand a-strain of 40 to 50 tons. The anchors tend to be madein three sizes. 10×25 in., with i4-n. pole, 9 ft. long; 10×30 in., eluding a number of controlled by the British Electrical Traction Co., Ltd.,and have actually provided really satisfactory outcomes. The sales company of this United states Ventilating Co. reaches 15 CortUlndtSt., new york, plus the officials regarding the organization tend to be: Presi-dent, Anderson Fowler; assistant, Richard B. Kelly, who is vice-president regarding the Fifth National Bank; treasurer and basic man-ager, H. M. Shaw.

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MILLER ANCHOR AND AUGER. with iH-m. pole, 9 ft. lengthy; 10×30 in., with ili-in. pole, 9 ft. long.The anchors are constructed of cast-iron together with rods of wrought iron.The anger features a 9-ft. stem, one-inch in diameter, with an adjustablehandle, once the fury decreases the handle can he moved up thestem. The Miller Anchor Co., Norwalk, O., wliich manufactures thesewrecking anchors, in addition manufactures a line of smaller anchors foranchoring guy cables to phone and trolley poles, with acombination auger with two dull heads when it comes to various sizeanchors. The Miller stone anchor can be something of the companyand can be utilized in just about any sort of rock. These are typically ij4 •■ i diameterand 3^ ft. long, with a J^-in. pole, and can remain a-strain of 15,000lb. The Miller items have actually satisfied with significant amounts of success andare used extensively through the nation by these types of problems asthe Bell phone Co., the Appleyard Syndicate, the Detroit &Toledo Construction Co. in addition to united states of america phone Co

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Image from page 171 of “The Suburbanite; a monthly mag for those who are and the ones whom need to in enthusiastic about suburban houses” (1905)

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Image from web page 171 of “The Suburbanite; a monthly magazine if you are and the ones which should in enthusiastic about suburban homes” (1905)
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Identifier: suburbanitemonth06cent
Title: The Suburbanite; a monthly magazine for those who are and people which should in thinking about residential district houses
12 Months: 1905 (1900s)
Writers: Central railroad of New Jersey. [from old catalog]
Subjects: New Jersey — Description and travel. [from old catalog] New York (City) — Suburbs. [from old catalog]
Publisher: [New York]
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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both already been reared came over united states with re-sistless energy. Property .speculations tend to be beingmade in flat extends of salt meadowbetween Jersey City and Xewark. Tothe attention of this comnniter this could looklike an unhealthy spot to purchase land onwhich to create, yet many miles of themeadow happen sold recently and arebeing held during the day whenever dumpingcarts may have reclaimed all of them. .-ll therefuse of .Xewark, our planet dug from itscellars, its winter ashes ami much othersolid stuffing is thrown upon the meadowsannu;dlv. and the margin of solid groundsteadily encroaches in the waste land.Similar lands regarding edge of Newarkr>a are increasingly being reclaimed, which is pre-dicted that in the future Xewarkw sick he a good seaport, achieved by a shipcanal. The son having juststarted to your workplace in Xew York, and wholives in Xewark. and travels right back andforth everv dav. said a contractor re-cently towards the Sun. will sec marvelouschanges in those exact same meadows beforehes grav-haired. i8 THE SUBURBANITE

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Rare Sport in [he deep-sea Sport for Anglers Along the Jersey Coast—Game Fish associated with the Surf By JAMES A. CRUIKSHANK

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Image from page 84 of “The Ladies’ house log” (1889)
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Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Females’ house log
12 Months: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Adding Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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AM I ABLE TO HELP? Sally requested. Then, whenshe saw me personally making Bordens InstantCoffee, Goodness, whats that? Excel-lent coffee, we stated, All coffee, not a mix-ture. With no pot, no grounds, no waste! SALLY BLUSHED and gulped, I’m sure Ishouldnt be tellingpwhowtocook, MotherBrown, nevertheless the immediate coffees Ive attempted,we didnt like a bit. Could we have antique ground coffee just this once?

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I RECENTLY SAID, Theres something regarding the go to in todays Gazette. Dont you prefer tosee it? She had been deep inside report once I handed the lady a cup of Bordens, Mmmm . . .this is good! she said. It is real coffee! Therefore it is, I told her. Its Bordens!For goodness sake, she laughed, I was thinking We knew all about immediate coffee . . . but Ididnt understand Bordens! (Sally calls the flowers her bread-and-butter-and-a^£ current!) Money back if BORDENS doesntbeat your chosen coffee!* AMERICAS QUICKEST MARKETING PURE INSTANT COFFEE •I* utilize about half a jar of Bordens. After that, in the event that you do not agree it tastes better than any coffee you ever used, sendus the container because of the unused articles, and well refund your hard earned money. The Borden Co.. 350 Madison Ave., N. Y. 17, N. Y.

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Niagara Falls
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Image explanation from historical lecture booklet: "Today the main liquid from the US part of Niagara Falls, and component regarding the Canadian part, is removed through great pipes or tunnels and made to make huge tires. When you look at the energy flowers these rims. In the power flowers these rims are linked to dynamos to ensure that electrical power is produced. This energy is not only utilized near-at-hand, but sold to consumers many miles away."

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Image from web page 950 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)

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Image from web page 950 of “Gleanings in bee tradition” (1874)
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Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu39medi
Title: Gleanings in bee tradition
12 Months: 1874 (1870s)
Writers:
Subjects: Bees Bee tradition
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Adding Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Do Your OwnPrinting Cards, circulars, guide, magazine. Hit $.5 Larirer, 818; Rotary. 160.Save money. Big revenue printingfor ohers. All easy; guidelines sent.Write factory for press catalog,TYPE, cards, report. THE PRESS CO.. W?ri^ep, Conn, 22 GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTTTRE Mar. 1

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MAULE S SEEDS AFTER GROWN ALWAYS GROWN means that for quite some time past we havedone such a huge seed company. 79,430customers in Pennsylvania alone, with almosthalf a million the world over. My brand new Seed Bookfor 1911 is a wonder; contains every little thing inseeds, light bulbs and plants worth developing. Weighs 12ounces; 600 illustravions 4 colored plates, 176pages. Any gardener s nding his name on apostal card can have it the inquiring. Address WM. HENRV MAULE1707-09-11 Filbert St., Philadelphia. Pa. ^Send 5 cents (stamps) and mention thispaper and I will enclose into the cataloguea packet of seed of this above option pansy. Greatest of Berries PLANTPHOTO is the better Berry the entire world has ever before understood, discovered in tlie Himalaya M oantalne. Its growth and produc- ti V-E –

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Image from page 42 of “Cotton” (1900)
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Identifier: cotton00nati
Title: Cotton
12 Months: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: National connection of cotton fiber producers
Subjects: Cotton make
Publisher: [s.l. : National Association of Cotton Manufacturers]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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toaccount for the exquisite fineness of weaving on virtually any theory. Their particular spinning executes had been also simpler: a polished, delicatebit of hand timber, averaging maybe a base in total, tapering to arounded point, as well as the best diameter about since thick as a finepaint brush; two short bobbins thrust into an element of reed; and athicker and bigger stick carved at either end aided by the mind of ananimal or a person figure, and familiar with double and twist. Specific low clay bowls usually are found in the ancient basketsof the forgotten craftsmen. These probably contained liquid tomoisten the hands associated with the spinner and correct the dryness of thePeruvian atmosphere. Inside vast collections of this United states Museum of NaturalHistory, I discovered cotton fiber when you look at the following kinds: within the seed, intmcarded lint, in broad laps carded and bound in shapes not unlikeminiature beehives. I assume that the seeds had been very first removed bvhand, the lint very carefully dusted, then pulled aside, a lot into the

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Ceramic publishing rollers from pre-historie Peru.(American Mnseutn of Normal History) [31] A SHORT NARRATIVE OF A GREAT FIBER

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Image from page 83 of “America’s war for humanity, related in story and picture, adopting a complete history of Cuba’s challenge for liberty…” (1898)
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Identifier: americaswarforhu00inga
Title: America’s war for mankind, related in tale and photo, adopting a total history of Cuba’s fight for freedom…
12 Months: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Thompson
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center

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onor becoming received by the woman Majesty. Beforebeing ushered in to the stately salon-study, where the Queen Regent receivesvisitors, I had to pass along innumerable lobbies and ante chambers, mountand descend staircases, losing myself right here, finding another lobby here,and being stopped almost at each action by superbly-livered ushers and palaceofficials costumed like ambassadors. His Majesty and his august mom are very well guarded. When I unfortunatelydo maybe not understand a word of Spanish, it had been impossible for me to know the 80 AMERICAS WAR FOR HUMANITY. replies provided to my questions, also supposing these to own been understood;but fundamentally, after a long and checkered trip through the immenseroyal palace, we reached my destination, the anteroom, having created theaudience card with that we was supplied nearly a score of that time period. Three orfour individuals, already waiting their particular turns to-be gotten, were talking famil-iarly collectively. One ended up being the Grand Chamberlain, grave and proper, as befit-

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ALFONSO ALONG WITH HIS SISTERS. ted their place. When I waited, various other audience-seekers came, among thembeing a staff officer. My move to be received came quickly, and I also discovered myself bowing beforethe Queen Regent. Everybody knows, at the least through having seen herphotograph, the options that come with the Queen Regent of Spain; exactly what every onedoes maybe not know, exactly what no photo can make, is the woman Majestys environment of ex- A JOB INTERVIEW AMONG QUEEN CHRISTINA. 81 treme kindness and, at precisely the same time, of energy. One experiences, first, afeeling of value, after that an impulse of sympathy. In her own quick costume ofdark-colored silk, her mind erect, her eyes bright and sparkling with intelli-gence, Queen Christina hasn’t lost the model of the archduchesses of Aus-tria. She reminds one out of numerous ways associated with Duchess of Orleans, which alsowas an Austrian archduchess. I readily understood, on seeing the Queen, the meaningof what a memberof the Cortes had said to myself each morning: Queen Isabella was popular.Queen Christina

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