Image from page 109 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)

A few nice annual credit report images I found:

Image from page 109 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
annual credit report
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19192mass
Title: Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Annual report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Public utilities
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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, …. Other yard employees, …… Fuel for yard locomotives, …… Other yard expenses, ……. Injuries to persons, ……. Loss and damage, ……. Other rail transportation expenses, …. Total transportation, rail line. Administration,Valuation expenses.Other general expenses. General. Total general expenses, Grand Total Railway Operating Expenses, ,387 05 28,342 01 893 82 612 29 4,228 05 1,722 73 3,380 47t ,805 48 ,368 33 833 64 1 03 1,722 79 464 361 ,461 43 0 88 ,965 06 3,905 27 14,090 23 24,367 42 8,433 59 1,201 62 1,722 75 71 41 453 91 ,211 26 ,738 101,032 202,273 65 ,043 95 6,683 00 t Credit.Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 10L37 per cent. 78 RAILROAD RETURNS. [Jan. Description of Railroad owned and operated. Railroad owned.Length of main line, ….Length of side track, etc Total Length of Track owned, . Railroad operated.Length of main line, …. Length of side track, etc., …. Total Length of Track operated,

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1920.1 GRAFTON & UPTON. 79 RETURN GRAFTON & UPTON RAILROAD COMPANY For the Year ending December 31, 1919. Directors. r- -■ N.vME OF Director. Office Address. Date ofBeginningof Term. Date ofExpirationof Term. George A. Draper,Eben D. Bancroft, .Frank J. Dutcher,George W. Knowlton,Edw. P. Usher, Hopedale, Mass., .Hopedale, Mass., .Hopedale, Mass., .West Upton, Mass.,Grafton, Mass., Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919 Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920 Principal General Officers. Title of Gener.4.l Officer. Name of Person holding Officeat Close of Year. Office Address. President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Gen. Mgr. and Gen. Supt.,General Counsel George A. Draper Eben D. Pancroft Frank J. Dutcher, …. Harry A. Billings Wendell Williams Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Milford, Mass. Comparative General Balance Sheet — Asset Side. . , Balance at Beginning of Year. Item. Balance

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Image from page 61 of “Annual catalogue of the Indiana Normal School of Pennsylvania” (1907)
annual credit report
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Identifier: annualcatalogueo1907indi
Title: Annual catalogue of the Indiana Normal School of Pennsylvania
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Indiana State Normal School (Indiana, Pa.)
Subjects: Indiana State Normal School (Indiana, Pa.) Curricula Catalogs.
Publisher: Indiana State Normal School (Indiana, Pa.)
Contributing Library: Indiana University of Pennsylvania Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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student to a ticket of admission to all athletic events, the course of universityextension lectures and all other lectures under the auspices of the school. Bills for board cuid tuition arc /^ayablc. one-half at the opcniiii::;. and flu- re-mainder at the middle of tlie term. State aid is not credited before the endof the term. Bank Drafts, Checks. Express and P. O. Orders are accepted. Paymentsmust be made, or satisfactorily provided for. before students are assigned toclasses. Students desiring to leave school before the close of the term must report tothe Principal and settle any unpaid accounts : and in all cases bills for board andtuition will be made out for the entire term unless notice of leaving is given atthe time of leaving, or (in case this is impossible) immediately thereafter. Visitors expecting to remain more than three days are requested to makearrangements in advance with the Principal. JII bills are f^ayable to the Principal. oo prN^JSVLVA^4,^ ^JATe: ^Hf NORMA^SCHOOL

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9 d TEXT BOOKS Stationery and text books used in the Institution can be purchased at thebook room in the main building at regular prices; or the text books can berented at reasonable rates by those who do not wish to purchase. The fol-lowing is the list in use : Astronomy—Todd.Botany—Bergen. Plant Dissection—Arthur, Brown and Coulter.Business: Book-keeping—Goodyear. Commercial Law—Powers and Lyons. Shorthand—Ben Pitman. Typewriting—an Sant (Touch).Chemistry—Remsen. Laboratory Maimal—Remsen. Qualitative Analysis—Irish. Quantitative Analysis—Evans. Civil Government—Andrews, Shimmell.English : Composition and Rlietoric—Longwood and Emerson. Composition and Rhetoric—Damon and Herrick. Evolution of Expression. .56

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Image from page 160 of “Report” (1866)
annual credit report
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Identifier: report1915mary
Title: Report
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Maryland. State Board of Education
Subjects: Education
Publisher: Annapolis [etc.]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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ve to fourteen dollars. Students who pursued thereview courses only, were exempt of all fees except the registration,fee of five dollars. A total of forty-eight regularly scheduled and five special courseswere given during the session. This is an increase of thirty-five inthe total number of courses offered in the Summer Session. With theexception of the work in elementary agriculture, the courses in theCollege of Agriculture are the same as those given during the regularcollege year. The large number of courses offered makes it possible forthe student to select those subjects best adapted to the needs of his orher particular community. On account of the field work that may bedone, many of these courses may be pursued with better advantageduring the summer than during the regular college year. For the convenience of the student the courses were divided intothree groups. Group I consisted of Elementary School subjects, andincluded courses in Rural Elementary School Methods, Arithmetic,

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Annual Report op the State Board of Education 145 English, Physiology, and Hygiene, and United States History. GroupII was composed of Elementary Science and Vocational subjects, andincluded courses in Elementary Agriculture, Shop Work, FreehandDrawing, Handicraft, Domestic Science and Art, Biology, Algebra,Plane Geometry and School Library Economy. Group III constitutedthe college credit courses. The work in Group I was intended especi-ally for teachers and prospective teachers who were effected by thenew Minimum Training Law passed by the last Legislature. Withthe exception of the work in Elementary School Methods these coursesaimed chiefly to strengthen the student in the subject matter and con-sequently contained only a minimum of the theory of teaching them. It was the policy of a large number of students to pursue from oneto two courses that would strengthen them directly in their schoolwork for the ensuing year, and to fill out their schedule from thecollege credit group of stu

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Image from web page 58 of “Industries of to-day” (1904)

Some good dismal credit images I found:

Image from page 58 of “Industries of to-day” (1904)
poor credit
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Identifier: industriesoftoda00lane
Title: Industries of to-day
12 Months: 1904 (1900s)
Writers: Lane, Martha Luther, b. 1862
Subjects: Manufactures Occupations
Publisher: Boston, Ginn & organization
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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eteran picker is shownin the accompanying illustration. [48] A Crop of Cranberries Cranberries are not selected like strawberries,daintily and something by one. Experienced workersplunge your hands under the vines, palms upwardand hands curved, and literally scoop up the fruitby handfuls. A rake, makes it possible for the vines topass through its teeth and maintains the berries, isalso made use of, but is far lesssatisfactory than handlabor. Whenever a measure is filledand emptied the book-keeper standing near givesthe picker credit in hisaccount, though tally issometimes kept by meansof passes, all of whichrepresents a measure and a Veteran can be exchanged within store for tea, sugar,or various other commodities. The most common cost paid isten cents a measure, in addition to laborers, like thosein other occupations, are occasionally discontented. A couple of years ago a strike for higher wagesoccurred on a large marsh where there werefive hundred pickers. Fifty of those, preferringa half-loaf to no breads, held meekly on with their [49]

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Industries of To-Day just work at the old price, and, unfortunate to link, themalcontents, perched easily regarding the dikesas a vantage ground, pelted these with a showerof sticks and rocks. Harmony was finallyrestored and* the strikers returned to get results,but, together old lady among them declared, theylooked thereafter upon the fifty employees as poor-spirited creatures. Definitely, because they work because of the job, there isno potential for cheating, said a visitor to a shrewdproprietor. He looked skeptical. We inform you, he stated, cranberry pickets basically like all the remainder of theworld. Some wouldnt just take a berry to save theirlives, as well as others lie awake nights to imagine howto fill-up their measures. Some will slyly just take a measure and dentin the base, and others have a way of givingthe actions a-shake to be able to toss the berriesup and make five quarts look like six. Humannature is great human on a cranberry bog! Berry selecting has its own champion workers, someof who average over 200 quarts aday, and there

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Image from page 341 of “Fables” (1757)
poor credit
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Identifier: fables__01gayjuoft
Title: Fables
12 Months: 1757 (1750s)
Writers: Gay, John, 1685-1732
Topics: Fables
Publisher: London C. Hitch
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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lit to his part l>c fitted. Tile Swan, fays he, in hands ihall (LineThe foldicrs marvelous toil be thine.The CiKk lliall mighty wealth attain : get, feek it from the llormy primary. The court ihall function as the Spiders fphertj Pgwr, fortune, ihall reward him there. In -516 PyJ B L E S. In mufics art the Afss fameShall emulate Corellis name. Each took the part that he advisd.And all had been similarly defpisd.A Farmer, at his folly movd.The lifeless preceptor therefore reprovd. Blockhead, fays he, by what youve done.One would have thought em each your fon;For parents, with their offspring blind,Confult nor parts nor change of brain -,But evn in infancy decreeWhat this, exactly what tother fon fliall be.Had judgment weighd the cafe.Their genius therefore had fixd their particular place:The Swan had learnt the failors art;The Cock had playd the foldiers component; The T A-B L E !^. 317 The Spitlcr when you look at the weavers tradeNnil credit had a king’s ransom made ;But tor the luol in evVy clafsThe blockhead had appeard an Afi. ^m>^^ FABLE 38 FABLES.

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{xra^eirtvn FABLE XV. ^he CooK-MAiDj the Turnspit, together with Ox. To a Poor guy.^^Onfider man in evry fphere; Then tell me, is your great deal Icvere ?Tis murmur, difcontent, diftruft,which makes you wretched. Jesus is juft. We grant F yi n r. K .V. we give that appetite miift l)c fcJ,That toil t(X3 earns thy everyday loaves of bread.What after that – thy desires tend to be feen and knownBut evr) mortal feels his own.Were lx)rn a reftlefs needy staff:Show mc the happier guy than you.Adam, thoiii^h blcli above his type,For choose of focial woman pind :Eves wants the fubtle ferpent law;I ler fickle tafte tranfgrcfi.d what the law states:Thu^ Icll our fires; and their particular difgra<.cThe curfc entaild on people. hen Philips fon, by glor) led,Had oer the world their empire fpread;whenever altars to their name were drcli,That he was man his tears confcft. Tlic hopes of avarice tend to be chcckt;The proud guy constantly wants rcf^xrct. Mut 320 FA B L E S. Wliat numerous wishes on powr attend ? Aspiration never ever gains its end. Whom hath not heard the wealthy complain Of fu

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Image from web page 147 of “the road railroad analysis” (1891)
poor credit
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev15amer
Title: The street railroad review
12 Months: 1891 (1890s)
Writers: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Topics: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Assessment Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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e, consequently, of die merit and demerit record, as thiscompany keeps it, is always to separate among the list of great males instead thanamong poor people ones, since this is shown by their particular individual recordson which look credit balances of merits. 128 STREET RAILWAY EVALUATION. [Vol. XV, No. 2. Miller Anchors. The accompanying illustration is of the Miller anchor forrailway wrecking functions, and auger for establishing them.These anchors could be emerge from 30 to 40 mins, eight feet deep,and will stand a-strain of 40 to 50 tons. The anchors tend to be madein three sizes. 10×25 in., with i4-n. pole, 9 ft. long; 10×30 in., eluding a number of controlled by the British Electrical Traction Co., Ltd.,and have actually provided really satisfactory outcomes. The sales company of this United states Ventilating Co. reaches 15 CortUlndtSt., new york, plus the officials regarding the organization tend to be: Presi-dent, Anderson Fowler; assistant, Richard B. Kelly, who is vice-president regarding the Fifth National Bank; treasurer and basic man-ager, H. M. Shaw.

Text Appearing After Image:
MILLER ANCHOR AND AUGER. with iH-m. pole, 9 ft. lengthy; 10×30 in., with ili-in. pole, 9 ft. long.The anchors are constructed of cast-iron together with rods of wrought iron.The anger features a 9-ft. stem, one-inch in diameter, with an adjustablehandle, once the fury decreases the handle can he moved up thestem. The Miller Anchor Co., Norwalk, O., wliich manufactures thesewrecking anchors, in addition manufactures a line of smaller anchors foranchoring guy cables to phone and trolley poles, with acombination auger with two dull heads when it comes to various sizeanchors. The Miller stone anchor can be something of the companyand can be utilized in just about any sort of rock. These are typically ij4 •■ i diameterand 3^ ft. long, with a J^-in. pole, and can remain a-strain of 15,000lb. The Miller items have actually satisfied with significant amounts of success andare used extensively through the nation by these types of problems asthe Bell phone Co., the Appleyard Syndicate, the Detroit &Toledo Construction Co. in addition to united states of america phone Co

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Image from page 171 of “The Suburbanite; a monthly mag for those who are and the ones whom need to in enthusiastic about suburban houses” (1905)

Browse these sell house images:

Image from web page 171 of “The Suburbanite; a monthly magazine if you are and the ones which should in enthusiastic about suburban homes” (1905)
sell home
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Identifier: suburbanitemonth06cent
Title: The Suburbanite; a monthly magazine for those who are and people which should in thinking about residential district houses
12 Months: 1905 (1900s)
Writers: Central railroad of New Jersey. [from old catalog]
Subjects: New Jersey — Description and travel. [from old catalog] New York (City) — Suburbs. [from old catalog]
Publisher: [New York]
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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both already been reared came over united states with re-sistless energy. Property .speculations tend to be beingmade in flat extends of salt meadowbetween Jersey City and Xewark. Tothe attention of this comnniter this could looklike an unhealthy spot to purchase land onwhich to create, yet many miles of themeadow happen sold recently and arebeing held during the day whenever dumpingcarts may have reclaimed all of them. .-ll therefuse of .Xewark, our planet dug from itscellars, its winter ashes ami much othersolid stuffing is thrown upon the meadowsannu;dlv. and the margin of solid groundsteadily encroaches in the waste land.Similar lands regarding edge of Newarkr>a are increasingly being reclaimed, which is pre-dicted that in the future Xewarkw sick he a good seaport, achieved by a shipcanal. The son having juststarted to your workplace in Xew York, and wholives in Xewark. and travels right back andforth everv dav. said a contractor re-cently towards the Sun. will sec marvelouschanges in those exact same meadows beforehes grav-haired. i8 THE SUBURBANITE

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Rare Sport in [he deep-sea Sport for Anglers Along the Jersey Coast—Game Fish associated with the Surf By JAMES A. CRUIKSHANK

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Image from page 84 of “The Ladies’ house log” (1889)
sell residence
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Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Females’ house log
12 Months: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Adding Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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AM I ABLE TO HELP? Sally requested. Then, whenshe saw me personally making Bordens InstantCoffee, Goodness, whats that? Excel-lent coffee, we stated, All coffee, not a mix-ture. With no pot, no grounds, no waste! SALLY BLUSHED and gulped, I’m sure Ishouldnt be tellingpwhowtocook, MotherBrown, nevertheless the immediate coffees Ive attempted,we didnt like a bit. Could we have antique ground coffee just this once?

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I RECENTLY SAID, Theres something regarding the go to in todays Gazette. Dont you prefer tosee it? She had been deep inside report once I handed the lady a cup of Bordens, Mmmm . . .this is good! she said. It is real coffee! Therefore it is, I told her. Its Bordens!For goodness sake, she laughed, I was thinking We knew all about immediate coffee . . . but Ididnt understand Bordens! (Sally calls the flowers her bread-and-butter-and-a^£ current!) Money back if BORDENS doesntbeat your chosen coffee!* AMERICAS QUICKEST MARKETING PURE INSTANT COFFEE •I* utilize about half a jar of Bordens. After that, in the event that you do not agree it tastes better than any coffee you ever used, sendus the container because of the unused articles, and well refund your hard earned money. The Borden Co.. 350 Madison Ave., N. Y. 17, N. Y.

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Niagara Falls
sell house
Image by OSU Specialized Collections & Archives : Commons

Image explanation from historical lecture booklet: "Today the main liquid from the US part of Niagara Falls, and component regarding the Canadian part, is removed through great pipes or tunnels and made to make huge tires. When you look at the energy flowers these rims. In the power flowers these rims are linked to dynamos to ensure that electrical power is produced. This energy is not only utilized near-at-hand, but sold to consumers many miles away."

First Range: Visual Instruction Department Lantern Slides

Item Quantity: P217:set 020 011

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Image from web page 950 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)

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Image from web page 950 of “Gleanings in bee tradition” (1874)
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Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu39medi
Title: Gleanings in bee tradition
12 Months: 1874 (1870s)
Writers:
Subjects: Bees Bee tradition
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Adding Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Do Your OwnPrinting Cards, circulars, guide, magazine. Hit $.5 Larirer, 818; Rotary. 160.Save money. Big revenue printingfor ohers. All easy; guidelines sent.Write factory for press catalog,TYPE, cards, report. THE PRESS CO.. W?ri^ep, Conn, 22 GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTTTRE Mar. 1

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MAULE S SEEDS AFTER GROWN ALWAYS GROWN means that for quite some time past we havedone such a huge seed company. 79,430customers in Pennsylvania alone, with almosthalf a million the world over. My brand new Seed Bookfor 1911 is a wonder; contains every little thing inseeds, light bulbs and plants worth developing. Weighs 12ounces; 600 illustravions 4 colored plates, 176pages. Any gardener s nding his name on apostal card can have it the inquiring. Address WM. HENRV MAULE1707-09-11 Filbert St., Philadelphia. Pa. ^Send 5 cents (stamps) and mention thispaper and I will enclose into the cataloguea packet of seed of this above option pansy. Greatest of Berries PLANTPHOTO is the better Berry the entire world has ever before understood, discovered in tlie Himalaya M oantalne. Its growth and produc- ti V-E –

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Image from page 42 of “Cotton” (1900)
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Identifier: cotton00nati
Title: Cotton
12 Months: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: National connection of cotton fiber producers
Subjects: Cotton make
Publisher: [s.l. : National Association of Cotton Manufacturers]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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toaccount for the exquisite fineness of weaving on virtually any theory. Their particular spinning executes had been also simpler: a polished, delicatebit of hand timber, averaging maybe a base in total, tapering to arounded point, as well as the best diameter about since thick as a finepaint brush; two short bobbins thrust into an element of reed; and athicker and bigger stick carved at either end aided by the mind of ananimal or a person figure, and familiar with double and twist. Specific low clay bowls usually are found in the ancient basketsof the forgotten craftsmen. These probably contained liquid tomoisten the hands associated with the spinner and correct the dryness of thePeruvian atmosphere. Inside vast collections of this United states Museum of NaturalHistory, I discovered cotton fiber when you look at the following kinds: within the seed, intmcarded lint, in broad laps carded and bound in shapes not unlikeminiature beehives. I assume that the seeds had been very first removed bvhand, the lint very carefully dusted, then pulled aside, a lot into the

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Ceramic publishing rollers from pre-historie Peru.(American Mnseutn of Normal History) [31] A SHORT NARRATIVE OF A GREAT FIBER

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Image from page 83 of “America’s war for humanity, related in story and picture, adopting a complete history of Cuba’s challenge for liberty…” (1898)
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Identifier: americaswarforhu00inga
Title: America’s war for mankind, related in tale and photo, adopting a total history of Cuba’s fight for freedom…
12 Months: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Thompson
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center

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onor becoming received by the woman Majesty. Beforebeing ushered in to the stately salon-study, where the Queen Regent receivesvisitors, I had to pass along innumerable lobbies and ante chambers, mountand descend staircases, losing myself right here, finding another lobby here,and being stopped almost at each action by superbly-livered ushers and palaceofficials costumed like ambassadors. His Majesty and his august mom are very well guarded. When I unfortunatelydo maybe not understand a word of Spanish, it had been impossible for me to know the 80 AMERICAS WAR FOR HUMANITY. replies provided to my questions, also supposing these to own been understood;but fundamentally, after a long and checkered trip through the immenseroyal palace, we reached my destination, the anteroom, having created theaudience card with that we was supplied nearly a score of that time period. Three orfour individuals, already waiting their particular turns to-be gotten, were talking famil-iarly collectively. One ended up being the Grand Chamberlain, grave and proper, as befit-

Text Appearing After-image:
ALFONSO ALONG WITH HIS SISTERS. ted their place. When I waited, various other audience-seekers came, among thembeing a staff officer. My move to be received came quickly, and I also discovered myself bowing beforethe Queen Regent. Everybody knows, at the least through having seen herphotograph, the options that come with the Queen Regent of Spain; exactly what every onedoes maybe not know, exactly what no photo can make, is the woman Majestys environment of ex- A JOB INTERVIEW AMONG QUEEN CHRISTINA. 81 treme kindness and, at precisely the same time, of energy. One experiences, first, afeeling of value, after that an impulse of sympathy. In her own quick costume ofdark-colored silk, her mind erect, her eyes bright and sparkling with intelli-gence, Queen Christina hasn’t lost the model of the archduchesses of Aus-tria. She reminds one out of numerous ways associated with Duchess of Orleans, which alsowas an Austrian archduchess. I readily understood, on seeing the Queen, the meaningof what a memberof the Cortes had said to myself each morning: Queen Isabella was popular.Queen Christina

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Photo from web page 163 of “Minnesota state gazetteer and company directory site” (1920).

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Image from page 163 of “Minnesota state gazetteer and business directory” (1920)
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Identifier: minnesotastatega222unse
Title: Minnesota state gazetteer and business directory
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Polk
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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llock Mngr Oils and Greases CorOak and 4th S E Standard Paint & Lead Works FrankM Crolius spl agt 41. Masonic Temple Standard Paper Box Co E W ECoeserpres 503 S 3d Standard Press Jno H Swenson mngrprinters 324 oth av S Standard Products Supply Co R G Car-gill pres D L Raymond treas A AHuston sec ice cream cone mnfrs STANDARD RATING CO Carl F Hacker Mngr Confidential ReportsCollections and Adjustments 405 Met Bank bids S STANDARD SALES SYSTEM Owen A Clark Mngr Sab s Conductorsand Merchandise Brokers 611-12 Bos-ton blk Standard Sausage Co 1517 S 5th STANDARD SERVICE CO CarlF Hacker Mngr Accounting Advertis-ing Selling Credits Financing Inves-tigations Business Management ) *»Met Hank bldg Tel Atlantic MiO Seeright side lines Standard signs (Inc) H B Green presL E G^eeri see 4 26 6th at S Standard Stone Sidewalk Co P J Nv>mngr mnfrs stone and cement Rlo>-walks l% S ^th and 1601 Oak P. C Standard Tile A Marble Co Werner ,;Westeen pres II B Watson sec andtreat! contrs MS S 1Mb

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ST. PAUL FOUNDRY COMPANY STRUCTURAL STEEL AND IRON-GRAY IRON AND SEMI-STEEL CASTINGS ST. PAUL, MINX. See Page 7 >linneni»oIi.< MINNESOTA STATE GAZETTEEU 1020 Standard Trading Co The D J Tsiv 7g-lou pros S A Zache sec and treasimports nuts 22K N 5th STANDARD WELDING & RE- pair Co (O L Duggan S S Thome)Welding and Repairing: rear 244 3d STANDIFORD CHASED ifre In- surance Ileal Estate and ExchangesCity and Suburban Plymouthbldg Stanek Jno J marble wks 4400 ChicagoStanford Joel barber 230 Cedar avStanger Cora milliner 829 Plymouth avStanley Edw L drugs BUT 3d av SStanley Hall & College 2118 Pleasant avStanley Harry C archt 706 Boston blkStanley Shoe Co F W Stanley mngr 36S 6th Stanley^ tine) Doyas T Stanley presJno E Michalsky sec shoes 233 EHennepin avStanoch Frank barber 2230 Wash av NStaples Forest E dentist SOS La Salle bids-Staples Henry L phys 420 La Salle bldgStapleton Wm J undertkr 705 W LakeStar Mrs Anna grocer 1117 12th av NStar Candy Store Chas Costakos mngr

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Image from page 172 of “Diversion of water from the Great lakes and Niagara river” (1921)
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Identifier: diversionofwat00unit
Title: Diversion of water from the Great lakes and Niagara river
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: United States. Army. Corps of engineers. [from old catalog] Warren, James Goold, 1858-1937. [from old catalog] United States. Board of engineers for rivers and harbors. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Water diversion Niagara River (N.Y. and Ont.)
Publisher: Washington, Govt. print. off.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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connected localities only, and the canalstill remains for the most part as left at the end of the first en-la rgement, except in so far as it has been destroyed in constructingthe new barge canal. Ultimately practically all the locks of the oldcanal were doubled to care for the enormous amount of traffic, andto provide lockage when one lock was out of commission. Practi-cally all canal boats were towed by mules or horses on a towpathalong one side of the canal. Tolls were charged on the old canals. The old Erie Canal pro-vided the first practicable commercial route between the Great Lakesregion and the United States seaboard. It made the growth of thewestern part of the State practicable, and was a great aid in open-ing up such western States as Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, and Wis-consin. Even to-day over 75 per cent of New York States popula-tion is to be found within 5 miles of the barge canal and the HudsonRiver. The early traffic on the canal was enormous for the times, 27880—21 9

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130 DIVERSION OF WATER FROM GREAT LAKES AND NIAGARA RIVER, and the tolls collected brought a wonderful revenue to the State.For many years there was no competition to this route, and littleby little as stretches of railway began to parallel the canal legisla-tive measures provided against competition. The canals were sovery popular and so lucrative to the State that their finances werenot at all times properly handled, and many lateral lines were con-structed which proved unprofitable and had to be abandoned. Rail-road competition finally crept in, and periods of financial depres-sion were experienced, resulting ultimately in a very large abandon-ment of the use of the canals. The number of tons of cargo carriedon the State canals in 1853 was 4,247,853. In 1872 the maximumtonnage was transported, namely, 6,673,370 tons. The tonnage car-ried in 1885 was 4,731,784; in 1905 it was 3,226,896. The tolls atfirst collected ranged from 5 mills per ton per mile for salt, gypsum,brick, sand, li

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Identifier: atlantacitydirec1922atla
Title: Atlanta City Directory
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors:
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Publisher: Atlanta City Directory Company
Contributing Library: Emory University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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lhollin Jas L (Lydia) chf elk Am Ry Exp Co hl23 S Main C PMilhous Jno D (Margaret) elk hl2, 465 N BoulevardMilikin Chas B (Lula) cashr Quick TireService h520 ^ashington Ruth elk r520 WashingtonMillan Jas A (Florence) dist mgr Scandi-navia Belting Co h325 MyrtleMillard A Gordon (Dorothy) brch mgrOakland Motor Car Co h al, 667Ponce de Leon av D Ralph (Florence) sec S A LynchEnterprises Finance Corp sec Pack-ard Enterprises of Ga Inc treas SouEnterprises Inc hlG. 1422 Peachtree Roblev C (Frederiea) trav h39 Park dr Thos J r340 Hemphill av Milledge see also Millidge Adeline sten Atl Joint Term r Deca-tur GaMilledgeville Oil Mills P D McCarley presM Frank v-pres 1010-12 Atl Natl BkbldgMillen Jas (c) plstr h509 WindsorMillender Louis (Mollie) elk h314 E Fair Saml elk r314 H Fair MURPHY DOOR BED CO. OF ATUNTA Murphy DoorBeds Majestic SteelKitchens Murphy CabinetIroning Boards Office andDisplay Rooms 204 PEACHTREEARCADE BLDG. TelephoneIvy 4331 Daniel Bros. Co. -13 – 47 – 49F»eaclntree Street

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Heating &Plumbing Contractors AU Repair Work Receives Prompt and Careful Attention 188 E. HunterStreet Phone Main 1999 811 SouthernMosaicTile Co. Tile Terrazzo Marble Mantels Lighting Fixtures ContractorsJobbers 1406-1407Candler Bldg. TelephoneIvy 2913 MOREGOODS -ARE- BOUGHT —AND- SOLD THROUGH THE ClassifiedBusinessDirectory THAN BY ANY OTHER MEDIUM ONEARTH BARCLAY & BRANDON CO. F U r^ E R A. L. 246 Ivy Street • cook h232 E Linden av Agrnes soft drinks 747 Marietta r44 Ponders Albert A (Eula) insp h363 Forrest av Albert P (Leila) pipe ftr hSSO Stewart av Alex (Carrie; Miller & Shields) ho61 Highland av Alice r46 Wabash av Alice C h Orchard H Alice G (wid Jacob li) h467 Bass Allen (Sallie) carp h672 N Ashby Alley L (Alma) flagmn h335 Cooper3III^L,ER ANDRKVV C (Preska; A C Mil-ler & Co), h ,

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Image from page 223 of “The industries of Saint-Louis: her advantages, sources, services, and commercial relations as a center of trade and make;” (1885)

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Identifier: industriesofsain00morr
Title: The sectors of Saint Louis: the woman benefits, resources, facilities, and commercial relations as a center of trade and make;
12 Months: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: [Morrison, Andrew and Irwin, John H. C.] [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: St. Loius, J. M. Elstner & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
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ummiskey, wiiohas occupied that place for fourteen years, as well as six many years prior thereto had been affixed tothe household in a clerical ability. The past four many years the institution was located at 617 Chestnut road, nearlyopposite the true home Exchange, the centre of trade in this range. Your house features theentire charge of numerous estates of opulent non-residents. Besides, the home has fee of avariety of important store home through the wholesale company area on 2nd andThird roads, and. of residence property atlanta divorce attorneys residence area in the town. Thefirm has at all times money to loan on property into the town and county, and tends to make product sales,collects rents, and usually attends to residential property entrusted to its guidance within St.Louis and also the county exterior. The standing for the firm is of this greatest in businesscircles, and reputation of the people in your house is of experienced, painstakingand lively business guys. 2l8 THE INDUSTRIES OF ST. LOUIS.

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THE BELMONT NAIL COMPANY. Wlieeliii}?, western Virginia* St. Louis Braiuh, J no A. (iibney, Aj^ciit: 310 Norili Third Slreet. The works associated with Belmont Nail business at Wheeling, western Virginia, cover thirty acresand use 1,000 fingers. Tleir capacity is 350,000 kegs yearly. The majority of this productis sold in St. Louis in addition to area furnished from this. The business has recently embarked when you look at the manufacture of steel nailsexclusively, and are also nowerecting Bessemer metal ma-chinery for the purpose. John A. Gibney is thegeneral telemarketer of thecom|iany at this point. Helias tilled that post for somenineteen many years, handlingwhile hence involved almostthe entire output of works.Pormerly, whenever only ironnails had been created by the com-pany, a large stock was car-ried available right here, hut tiie steel fingernails are in such need so it has not been possible to ac-cumulate a stock. The Belmont companys works would be the oldest in Wheeling, and probably for the West.They also are of the most useful capacity. Just before 18

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Image from web page 298 of “The street railroad review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailway03amer
Title: The street railway analysis
12 Months: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electric Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Evaluation Pub. Co
Adding Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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hesame gallery is the remote light division, displayingthe standard type incandescent device while the brand-new typesof direct-driven isolated lighting tnachinery. The alter- direct machine-made, and loaned toward General Electricby the latest York Illuminating Company. It has beenn solution 11 many years and you will be returned to again simply take uphard work. The Edison column of light, which types the centralattraction associated with the main floor, is planned following the Germantower of success. Below in the collonade the beautifuldisplay of electric glass ware additionally the surmounting glasslamp of 30,000 pieces forms a never to be forgottensight. The sum total space occupied is 300 by 350 legs in theElectricity building, form track space south of theTransportation plus the exhibits within the second building.The intramural road and energy house is also_cataloguedas an exhibit. Lieutenant Spencers work has-been magnificentlycarried away and grand display will entice the thous-ands it offers designed to touch and thrill.

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CAR HOME AND TRACKS REGARDING THE INTRAMURAL RAILWAY—SHOW ING CURVES. naling plant east associated with the center includes an immediate drivenalternator regarding the a Mcintosh-Seymour en-gine. In the same course of screen are definitely operatedthe Edison kind engine, the Lake Erie, together with M. C.Bullock engines straight to General Electrical multipo-lar generators, that have the latest iron clad arma-tures. This engine-generator display is in machineryhall and types a really interesting function regarding the initialpower supply. At the conclusion of the east screen is the extremely interestingmarine exhibit, listed below are shown the ship burning plantsboth direct and belt-driven, and search lights, with theprojector recovered through the U. S. S. Trenton, wreckedoff the Samoan isles. Additionally there is a fine screen of hoist, drill and electriclocomotive specialties into the room towards the Northwest ofthe center. The 3 period device is really repre-sented. North associated with the center may be the incandescent three wire sys-tem. The grand

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Picture from web page 204 of “The Tiger (trainee newspaper), Sept. 1911-June 1912” (1911).

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Picture from web page 204 of “The Tiger (pupil newspaper), Sept. 1911-June 1912” (1911)
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< img alt=" financing rates" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/14577650500_aff1e9a8da.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Picture by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14577650500" > Web Archive Publication Images

Identifier: tigerstudentnews14unse
Title: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidtigerstudentnews14unse" > The Tiger( trainee paper), Sept. 1911-June 1912 Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1911" > 1911 (< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1910" > 1910s) Writers:. Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectColorado_College" > Colorado University< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectStudent_publications" > Trainee magazines < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectColorado_College_student_newspaper" > Colorado University student paper< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectCollege_newspapers_and_periodicals" > University newspapers and also regulars Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherColorado_College" > Colorado University Adding Library:
< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorColorado_College__Tutt_Library" > Colorado University, Tutt Collection Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorLYRASIS_Members_and_Sloan_Foundation" > LYRASIS Members as well as Sloan Structure Sight Book Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/tigerstudentnews14unse/tigerstudentnews14unse#page/n204/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Customer Regarding This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/tigerstudentnews14unse
” rel=” nofollow” >
Catalog Entry Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidtigerstudentnews14unse" > All Images From Publication Click here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/tigerstudentnews14unse/tigerstudentnews14unse#page/n204/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view book online to see this image in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Photo: n the moral and also spiritual realm.There are two kinds, the one whodoes
incorrect intentionally and the onewho
does nothing. There is no dis-tinction in between them. They arerepresented in the Bible by theprodigal child and also the abundant young man. RRF AD For morning delivery. It, bread warm from the ovensbaked from the best flour, and thatwould command first costs anywhere.That you obtain from us. Is constantly excellent. THE CHICAGO BAKERY Have the others meet you at TuckersRestaurant 10 East Pikes Peak Avenue The Hassell Iron WorksCompany Founders as well as Machinists You could constantly conserve money ifyou will certainly involve see our line indiamonds, watches, jewelry, guns, showing off goods, fishingackel drawing collections, musicalinstruments, trunks, valises, orif you wish to financing money, youcan obtain it M.K.Myers LICENSED LENDING OFFICE27-29 EAST HOEHFANO ST. Cash Lent on Valuables Have Your Clothing Cleaned, Pressed andKept in First-Class Repair service by Sam the Gentlemens Valet Additionally Makes a Specialty of Offering PartiesSAM FLEMING THE TIGER II Text Appearing After Picture: EUROPEAN STRATEGY ALTA VIEW HOTEL Colorado Springs, Colorado Fees as well as Up Popular cost cafe with cuisine and also table

solution that has no premium. Firstclass garage adjacent. Unique interest to banquets as well as private parties. Whitney & Grimwood Head office for Pennants, Pillows, Books, Art Product, Framed Photo, Etc. See us for your CHRISTMAS OFFERS. ChristmasPhotos The most effective Designs atModerate Costs Rest for & them now at Emery Studio Corner Waterfall and Kiowa StreetsPhone Main 41 R. J. CORRIN Dry Cleansing, Pushing as well as Fixing and Renovating for Ladies as well as Gentlemen Job by the MonthWork Called for as well as Delivered Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree You can conserve from 25percent to 40 percenton our finest Hart, Schaf f ner & Marx, Kuppenheimer & Clothcraf t Matches andOvercoats Have we the two types here? Thequitter is not that we do not knowenough. We have an understanding ofwhat we should be, yet we quitwhen we ought to enter the biggame. Dad then went on explaining thevarious pett Keep in mind About Photos Please keep in mind that these photos are extracted from scanned web page photos that could have been electronically boosted for readability- pigmentation and also appearance of these pictures may not completely appear like the original work

. Picture from page 422 of” Journal of electricity”( 1917)< img alt=" finance rates" src= "https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/14577483367_9db952939a.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Photo by< a href= "http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14577483367" >

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Title: Journal of electrical power Year:
< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1917" > 1917(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1910" > 1910s) Authors:. Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectElectrical_engineering" > Electrical engineering< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectElectricity" > Electricity< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectGas_manufacture_and_works" > Gas manufacture and functions Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherSan_Francisco___Technical_Pub__Co_" > San Francisco: Technical Club. Co. Adding Collection:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorSan_Francisco_Public_Library" > San Francisco Public Collection Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorCalifornia_State_Library_Califa_LSTA_Grant" > California State Collection Califa/LSTA Grant Sight Book Page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/journalofele451151920sanf/journalofele451151920sanf#page/n422/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Visitor Concerning This Publication:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/journalofele451151920sanf" rel=" nofollow" >
Directory Access Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidjournalofele451151920sanf" > All Pictures From Book Go here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/journalofele451151920sanf/journalofele451151920sanf#page/n422/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > sight publication online to see this image in context in a browseable online variation of this publication. Text Appearing Before Photo: erican WholesaleLumber Dealers Association, inning accordance with an announcementby

L. E. Putnam, taking care of supervisor
, has made an averagecut in lumber rates of 28 percent from the February pricelist. At the same time it is not unreasonable to anticipate thiscut in lumber rates to impact other building-material lines. In the 2nd place, representative M. C. Kelly ofPennsylvania is reported to be framing a bill which he willintroduce at the December session of Congress which willprovide for the loaning of cash by the Postal SavingsBanks to individuals wanting to develop residences. The costs is aimedto soothe the real estate scenario and also its enroller declares thatthere are 55,000,000 individuals in the USA living inrented houses, much of whom would construct if they were pro-vided with the needed money at a sensible price of interest.He prompts elimination of the 00 deposit limit, an increase inthe price of interest, and also looks for stipulations for lending moneyto individuals within the postal areas. FLYING DE LUXE Text Appearing After Picture: PRICE INCREASES PROVIDED TO PACIFICPOWER & LIGHT The general public Service Payment of Washington on Sep-tember 29 passed on a choice when it comes to the PacificPower & Light Company concerning applications for rateincreases made in Progress all & cities as well as communities served bythe business in Washington, including gross yearly increasesof 0,000. All the firms demands were approved with the ex-ception of Yakima, Walla Walla, Pomeroy and Toppenish.The proposed boost at the initial 2 were reduced by 1 centnet on each step, and also on the other 2 by% cent web oneach step. All rates go right into effect as of meter readingstaken on Sept. 15 and also later on. No modification was asked for incooking or watering power. The increases cover domesticand business metered lights, level commercial lightingand commercial and flour milling power. WASHINGTON WATER POWER TO EXPAND LINE An expansion of the high-voltage line of the WashingtonWater Power Firm, Spokane, Wash., from Colfax toAlbion, a range of ten mi Keep in mind Concerning Pictures Please note that these pictures are drawn out from checked web page photos that may have been digitally boosted for readability -coloration and also look of these pictures might not completely appear like the initial work.

Image from page 477 of “Mirror, 1908” (1908)

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Image from page 477 of “Mirror, 1908” (1908)
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Identifier: mirror190800unse
Title: Mirror, 1908
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: yearbooks
Publisher: Bates College
Contributing Library: Bates University, Edmund Muskie Archives and Special Selections Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS People and Sloan Foundation

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en we sang and chatted a few more And later we cheered.We set-up 1908 steen times, and managers and capsThen piled to the Turner vehicle And hung to the straps. jimmy had an odd desire To be, what exactly is known as, passed away straight back,And so we made it happen, as if hed been Upon an air line track.One other stated, hed like sound Of crackling, breaking glass,So we formed in soccer style And rushed the door, en masse. When Phoebus gan his head to raise. We got back to Parker Hall.Ask Cussie and Doc that which we did to them. They might maybe not let you know all. Ah ! Such a night! Oh ! Such an occasion !Will we previously see another. Maybe some cool, November night as time goes by football weather.Again really poke the turn on brilliant And remain and smoke cigarettes together.And talk of these old college days When Shu had been Cap, and WilderAnd Cyrus smoked the vile Qboid And McCool something more gentle. One of the occasions of the season very long becoming remem-bered the enjoyable we’d, ended up being if the dormgirls entertained the men at the gym. Never ever performed

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o8 have actually a much better time. Junior self-esteem and col-lege cares were forgotten when you look at the life and enjoyable ofCountry supermarket, Tucker, and Seven in andSeven Out. Later on, whenever our ideas turnedtoward the chafing dishes, something over apassing interest ended up being evinced because of the young men in theculinary plans. Several spoon wassturdily, though deftly wielded by a masculinehand, and captain Shu ended up being discovered beatingeggs, as carefully intention upon his task as thoughit have been the plannings of a football campaign.Even now as we read once again the supper cards, weseem to get the appetizing aroma of rarebit, andfeel again the pangs of appetite that it developed after that. Ill present a hint —For a rarebit To skip Knox or Miss Blanchard youll go.Miss Shorey will giv-e you creamed chicken And chicken is great we all know !Miss Melcher tends to make Mexican Rarebit, Miss Jones has shrimp wiggle for you.Creamed salmon is served by skip Wentworth — Go pass in your order for two. Although our course through the Juni

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Image from web page 273 of “Canada, the empire of North; being the romantic tale associated with brand new dominion’s growth from colony to kingdom” (1909)
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Identifier: canadaempireofno00laut
Title: Canada, the empire regarding the North; becoming the enchanting tale of brand-new dominion’s development from colony to kingdom
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Writers: Laut, Agnes C. (Agnes Christina), 1871-1936
Topics: Canada — History
Publisher: Boston, London : Ginn and organization
Adding Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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h of Lake Champlain, then get across through the woods to Johnsons fort. Dieskauchose the second trail.Leaving half their males toguard the baggage,Dieskau bade fifteenhundred picked menfollow him on swiftestmarch with provisionsin haversack for onlyeight times. September8, 10 a.m., the marchersadvance through thewoods on Johnsons fort,when out of the blue theylearn that their particular scout haslied, —Johnson himselfis still at the fort. In-stead of five-hundred arefour thousand English.Advancing along thetrail V-shape, regulars inthe center, Canadians and Indians for each side, the French comeon a business of five-hundred English wagoners. In wildmelee of shouts the English escape in a rabble. Pursue!March ! hire ! Force the spot ! yells Dieskau, dashing forwardsword in hand, thinking to check out so closely from the pumps of therabble he can enter the English fort before the adversary know;but his Indians have forsaken him, and Johnsons scouts haveforewarned the approach of the French, as opposed to ambushing

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SIR WILLIAM JOHNSON DIESKAU DEFEATED ■39 THE SPOT for the English, Dieskau locates his own military ambushed. He hadsneered in the un-uniformed plow-boys of the English. Themore you can find, the greater we shall kill, he previously boasted ; butnow he discovers that the rude bushwhackers, just who fought likeboys each morning, at noon fought like men, by afternoonfought like devils.Their sharpshooterskept up a collision of fireto the fore, and fifteenhundred doubled on therear of his army, fold-ing united states up, he reported,like a pack of cards.Dieskau fell, shot in theleg plus the leg, anda bullet hit the cart-ridge box of this servantwho had been cleansing outthe injuries. Lay my telescopeand layer by me personally, and go!ordered Dieskau. Thisis as good a deathbed asany spot. Go! he thun-dered, witnessing their secondofficer hesitate. Dontyou see you might be required ?Go and appear a retreat. A 3rd shot pene-trated the wounded com-manders kidney. Lying alone, propped against a tree, he heardthe drums moving a retreat, when one of

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Image from page 423 of “Railway and locomotive manufacturing : a practical record of railroad motive power and rolling stock” (1901)
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Identifier: railwaylocomotiv14newy
Title: Railway and locomotive engineering : a practical log of railroad motive energy and rolling stock
12 Months: 1901 (1900s)
Writers:
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair Co
Adding Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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method andrepeated right back another, additionally the mistake notbe found. of Chicago. These are typically nonetheless using the sys-tem at New Orleans alongside ter-minals. American Locomotives in Asia. Although the foreign outcry has actually becomerather a matter of old record by thistime, nonetheless the following criticism by anengineer of an Indian road is quite in-teresting and evidently quite honest. Thepoint we cannot realize is the allegedhard cycling. Whenever Pennsylvania roadwas tinkering with the Webb com- viewpoint from connection with an Indianengine driver. The B. B. & C. I. Railway in 1899 re-ciuired mail motors; owing to the engin-eers hit in England, the tenders weresubmitted to an American firm, Baldwin& Co., nevertheless the company persistently declined toaccept any design, preferring to erect themin their own practices. Ten Yankees arrived on the scene to Bombay at acost of i200 less than any firm in Englandwould have actually recharged. The engines were shortly erected. We canassure my visitors they were rather a curi-

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w ESTixi.iiiM^K Fnii;n> in tiik ki.kctkicity building. Assistant Superintendent Jones said thatthere must certanly be two circuits—one for thetrain despatcher to communicate their or-ders, the other a nearby circuit between theblock providers. The movement of trainsby telephone is through signalsand perhaps not written requests, aside from clear-ance, permissive and caution cards, whichwould be applied as circumstances needed. The actual only real purchase that a train should re-ceive should really be one ordering it to movefrom one block to another; trains that areon time should be let alone. The Illinois Central Railroad used thetelephone for operating trains on St.Charles air-line throughout the year thatthese tracks were being raised into the town lb No. 1320, Wes Hartman (whogot more out of the woman than anyone else)shook down about 30 weight of avoirdupoisand he didnt have any to free, either.If these Indian motors ride worse thanthis there is something wrong together with them.some tips about what he claims into the Raihvay Time

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Image from page 19 of “The Farm-poultry” (1901)

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Image from page 19 of “The Farm-poultry” (1901)
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Identifier: farmpoultry1224unse
Title: The Farm-poultry
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Poultry Northeastern States Periodicals Poultry Industry Northeastern States Periodicals
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : I.S. Johnson and Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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or varieties,with provision made for recording of muchother data besides the number of eggs pro-duced. Opposite the record sheet for eachmonth is a page of Timely Notes. Thepart of the book devoted to advertising theHumphrey machines is also interesting, andthe book as a whole is a dignified and credit-able piece of advertisjng. Sliarples Cre.tm SepiiiMtoi-s make cows pay. Book,Business Dairj ing aud Cat249 free. W. Cliester, Pa. WINNING WINNINGS TODAY, The shows can not begin too early or be too big to find Dustons White Wyandottes In tlie winnings. Already tills fall lias his stock called time on llie competitors of liis cusldiners, IN THE LAKGE.ST AS WELL AS THE SMALLER SHOWS OF THE COUNTRY. AVltli more than 3000 select to select dont you think he can turn the trick for vou ? Can also mate youpairs, trios or pens lo produce exhibition and breeders. Write your wauts aud send 5c. sLimp for handsomestIoultry catulojiue puljlisliod. ARTHUR G. DUSTON, 223 East Main St., Marlboro, Mass.

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■the: National Fruit Grower Is the Largest Horticultural and Fruit Trade Pub-lication West of New York. Published monthly at ST. JOSEPH, MICHIGAN iinuiBifflt and the final sale in the market. It^ tells the prowerB who they may safe-? ly send their goods to In the citiesnpnfelofthe country, puardl them from^ Trees and Plants and Treatment ofiSi;! l| ■ ■rthe wiles of snide commiB«ion<Ct fame. You will like it, if vou grow-n-i-U ill 3 : houses, and Rives just the informa- i^J o «r «ir,o iifioiia tt-Tth PiPi-r-rlinU aISBw r tion the grower needs, whelher he 1631-he an amateurorprofesRlonsl. Iub-iield to the market, includini: vari-^ – lishes market reports from difTerent eties, cultivation, tranBportation, ;iiiintiir«ii;iMiiniii]iiniiiii:iiiii h i i cities, giving a summary of prices. Keeps you pooled on Horticulture, 2 iJHCrop ConditionB. Irices of Fruit rWl Products In the nillerent Markets, ^Nljh.Vi{ Fruit Trade Matters; Diseases of^ . Trees and Plants and Treatment of iSC

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Image from page 134 of “Report of the Commission of 1906 to Investigate the Condition of the Blind in the State of New York” (1907)
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Identifier: reportofcommissi00unse
Title: Report of the Commission of 1906 to Investigate the Condition of the Blind in the State of New York
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: J. B. Lyon Company, State Printers
Contributing Library: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc., M. C. Migel Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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twenty-one years of age, so that theadults, who are so greatly in the majority, could not enter if theywould; and it may well be supposed that but few would become in-mates of them, if they could. The plan of home teaching is, there-fore, a necessity for the adults, and emj)loyment could easily befound for a dozen more teachers, to search out and teach the blindof Pennsylvania alone. This Society devotes its efforts, free of charge, to the blindof all classes, without distinction of age, sex, color, nationality, orreligion The lot of the blind is indeed a sad one! Added to theiraffliction, oftentimes, is a dependence upon friends or relativesfor support; and it is no uncommon experience that blind per-sons have literally to sit in darkness and solitude, with nothingto occupy them but their own thoughts. But a change comes oer the scene when the embossed typeis handed to the blind ones by the home teacher, who comes witha word of cheer — Lighting up the darkness,Scattering the gloom.

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nO.MK IhAllIIXC ] ni; Tin; III.INII ]1Y A SIGHTLESS TEACHER. New York Association for the Blind. Commission on the Blind. 65 Despondency gives way to hope and joy soon follows, as theytrace the simple embossed characters, and, after one or twolessons, are able once more to read for themselves. This society is supported by annual subscriptions, direct con-tiibutions, legacies and donations, which amounted in 1905 to,422.46. Of this amount ,577.82 was disbursed, the balancebeing placed to the credit of the general, the publication, and thefemale teachers funds. The society paid 0 for the maleteachers salary and traveling expenses and 9.35 for those ofthe lady teacher. The secretary of the Commission attended the annual meetingof the Society in January, 1907, when similar reports were givenfor the past year. These reports showed a steady growth in thework of the Society, an increase in the number of persons in-structed and in the circulation of embossed literature. Thus, for th

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Image from page 26 of “Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania” (1899)
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Identifier: reportofbureauof1898penn
Title: Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines
Subjects: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines Coal mines and mining
Publisher: [Harrisburg] : The Bureau
Contributing Library: The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nrivalled coking coal fields, containedwiihin the Blairville basin, from Jacobs creek, its northern bound-ary, to Uniontown and Fairchance, without a break, or from its vastand practically untouched gas and steam coal territory held withinthe Lisbon trough, between the Youghiogheny and Monongahelarivers, this county, or at least its western half, is destined to be-come a vast supply station from which thousands of tons of highgrade fuel wealth are to be distributed far and wide, to meet the wantsof distant communities. This Connellsville seam of coal yields from 8 to 10 feet of work-able coal. The coal is clean, almost free from slate and sulphur, re-markably soft, easily mined and uniform in quality and thickness.The purity of this coal and its chemical and physical characteristicsuTake it peculiarly adapted for coking and gives it great value. It iseasily mined, and cokes with but little care. It is this ease of mining and coking that makes it possible to put coke from this districl

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Coking Pnrrss No. 11. BUREAU OF MINES. xxi iu competition with cokes and fuels in the juost distant parts ofthe United States. History and Growth. During the past quarter of a century many of our largest indus-tries have made their most noticeable advancement, yet none hasmade more rapid strides or been of greater importance and valuethan tlie manufacture of coke. The date of the first production ofcoke is iu doubt. By some authorities it is claimed that it was usedin the United States some years prior to 1770. Be this as it may,the best authenticated history gives Isaac Meason credit for thefirst production of coke in the Connellsville region. In 181G and 1817he built the first rolling mill erected west of the Allegheny moun-tains, at Ilumsock, Fayette county, and this mill went into opera-tion in September of the latter year. The coke was used in the re-hneiy and was made in Fayette county. In 1836, F. H. Oliphantbegan the use of coke as a fuel in Fairchance Furnace. From abouttiiat

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Image from page 223 of “The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society” (1898)

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Identifier: journalofamerica00amer
Title: The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: American-Irish Historical Society
Subjects: American-Irish Historical Society Irish Americans Ethnology
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : The Society
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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nd ProfessorRogers was chosen President. Associated with him during allits struggles for organization, were many of Massachusetts mosteminent scientists and educators. In 1864, Professor Rogers, in writing to his brother, mentionsthe admirable lectures of Henry Giles, the noted Irish-Americanlecturer and essayist, delivered in Boston. Professor Rogers, never very strong, was obliged to take oceantrips, and was much sought by foreign colleges for addresses onscientific subjects. His correspondence with James RussellLowell and Eliot, later President of Harvard, shows the esteemin which he was held by these gentlemen. On June 1st, 1870, he resigned as President of the Institute onaccount of ill health; and, while addressing the graduation classof the Institute in 1882, suddenly dropped, and was dead in ashort time. Few men in any walk of life had more glowing and gracefultributes paid them by men of eminence and prominence, thanWilliam B. Rogers, the son of an Irish emigrant and patriot.

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JOHN DOYLE. Reproduction by Anna Frances Levins LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. 197 William B. Rogers and his brothers lived splendid and usefullives, and no better monument could be placed to the credit ofany man than the internationally known Massachusetts Instituteof Technology. LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. The following letter was written by the father of the lateJohn T. Doyle of Menlo Park, California, upon his arrival in theUnited States an emigrant from Ireland. The original letter wasgiven by Miss Doyle, a granddaughter of John Doyle, to RichardC. OConnor, Esq., of San Francisco, Vice-President-General ofthis Society. In sending to the Journal a copy of the San Fran-cisco Monitor of February 8th, 1913, in which the letter waspublished, Mr OConnor writes: John Doyle was a native of Kilkenny, Ireland. He was theson of Edmond Doyle, who had joined the United Irishmen in1798, whose home was wrecked, and whose family was scatteredamong various relatives. John Doyle leaves many descendantsand relati

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Image from page 188 of “New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions” (1889)
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Identifier: bedfordmassac00newb
Title: New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.). Board of Trade Pease, Zeph. W. (Zephaniah Walter), b. 1861 Hough, George A Sayer, William L. (William Lawton), 1848-1914
Subjects:
Publisher: [New Bedford] Mercury publishing company, printers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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;^ high, with a monitor roof, and four hundred by one hundredfifty feet in area, while the picker and dye house is two hundred thirtyby fifty-two feet in area. The mill is provided with five thousand spindles, sixty-threebroad looms ninety-five and one hundred ten inches in width, andtwelve sets of cards. The machinery is operated by a two hundredfifty-two horse power Harris-Corliss engine, with three six-foot boilers,made by Cunningham, of Boston. Between seven hundred thousand and eight hundred thousandpounds of wool are worked annualh, and the cloth is made here andcolored in the wool and piece. The annual product is about eighthundred thousand yards of cloth, and one hundred sixty-five handsare employed. The officers of the corporation are as follows ; President — Loum Snow, Jr. Treasurer—Robert Snow. Directors — Edward D. Mandell, Charles W. Plummer, FrederickS. Allen, Charles W. Clifford. George S. Homer, Thomas H. Knowles,and Loum Snow, Jr. •t/-vy V ■i;fZ

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INDUSTRIAL AND FINANCIAL. 173 THE MANUFACTURE OF OIL. To mention New Bedford without devoting some space to her oilmanufactories would be to neglect the genius of the lamp, and toomuch credit cannot be given this industry for the present position ofthis city. William A. Walls interesting picture of The Origin of the Whale-tishery, which now hangs in the parlors of the home of the late Mrs.Charles W. Morgan, contains an illustration of the first oil factory inNew Bedford. It consisted merely of a trypot under an old shed bythe shore. Near by stands a man pouring oil from a long handleddipper into a wooden-hooped barrel. Another is handling over theblubber, while a third is coopering a barrel. The latter is engagedin conversation with an Indian who is seated upon a broken mast.On the shore, keeled over on her side, is one of the small sloopsemplo3ed in whaling at that time, and the river lies outstretched inthe background. Seated upon the frame of a grindstone, and giving directions toa

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