Nice 3 Credit Bureaus pictures

Consider these 3 credit bureaus pictures:

Image from page 248 of “Reports of Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. C. McCallum, Director and General management of this Military Railroads of the US, and [of James B. Fry] the provost-marshal General, in two components : appendix to the Report associated with Secretary of Wa
3 credit bureaus
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Identifier: reportsofbvtbrig00unit
Title: Reports of Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. C. McCallum, Director and General management associated with army Railroads associated with united states of america, and [of James B. Fry] the Provost Marshal General, in two parts : appendix on Report of this Secretary of War accompanying Message of President to the 39th Cong., first sess
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: United States. Congress (39th, first program : 1865-1866). House United States. Armed forces Railroad Dept McCallum, D. C. (Daniel Craig), 1815-1878 Fry, James B. (James Barnet), 1827-1894 United States. Provost-marshal General’s Bureau
Topics: United Says. Provost-marshal General’s Bureau United Says. Army Military railroads
Publisher: Washington [D.C.] : National Printing Workplace
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA give

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REPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL. 1G3 O Ci i^ — X: ^ Oi O^ i^ X) <^ o^sairj^jiin — r-(—ir:^ c^ i^ iij lO o 3^ ro toro -5-1^ o-o o ^ fcjD 00 CO -C lO o-o Tj< l^ {*? ,0 -^ CO O -t< lO i.O o CO — t^ CO -^ i.T ..■ —• lO •-£; lO o CO 10 CO « —* CJ o en (^ f^ 05 ai 00 lO Ci 00 — tc 10 o o CO r^ 35 tr? Tt c^ CO {^ Cl (?< rr C-< C^ ~j CO —. Ji O O 10 CO CO —we r-H o-o t- t^ (0< o-o C-l r^ £^ O 00 05 r-H 05 C| 10 ifO c< c0 IfO CO CO OJ 00 05 f^ O CO 35 CO Tti —we o-o O00 O) t^ ~ ~ O) TT 0* — CO O CO {^ 0» Xi (^ O 00 Ct >0 —. —- CO — 00 CO L-O X C! O 00 t^ f-^ 00 O O. O T ~. CO t^ CO C3 O CO rr rr ^ Oi 10 -^ coirf lOf 35 00 •*^-of 00 co o~ •^co cc 05 oT 1 ro oT co r-cf o (of r-T t^COCOCOrHTTOC^OOrHJ^COr-lOOirOO-, Offit-CJOr-*r-( iOeO CO—<CJp-l r-lr-l

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164 REPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PROVOST-MARSHAL GENERAL. Dining table No. 4.—Statciiicnt of trooj>s mustered to the solution associated with United Statesfor a less duration, than six months, (including all three-months guys,) perhaps not here-tofore paid on any quota, since the commencement of the rehellion, hut whichwould are correct credit wpon a suhsequent call, relative to pro-visions of part ]5, work of March 3, 1865. States. Maino brand new Hampsliire Vermont Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut New York nj Pennsylvania Maryland .. western Virginia District of Columbia Ohio Indiana Illinois Michigan Wisconsin Minnesota Iowa Missouri Kansas PERIODS OF SERVICE. a few months. Totals 771 932 782 4,983 3,147 2,402 16,922 3,123 20,175 900 4,720 12,357 6, 409 9,516 781 817 930 915 10,591 650 101,823 100 times. 167 6,809 5,640 769 7,675 1,297 36,254 7,197 11,328 2,134396144183,612 4 months. 121 121 o ^ ao 771 1,099 782 11,913 3,147 2,40222,562 3, 89227,850 1, 297900 4,720 48,611 13,606 20,844 781 2, 951930

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Image from web page 292 of “The street railroad analysis” (1891)
3 credit agencies
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev15amer
Title: The street railroad analysis
12 Months: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Topics: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Assessment Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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to its jt-tractivencss. During the conclusion regarding the energy station which hasbeen explained, the employes of the Camden Inter-state Railway Co., as a token of respect, presentedto the organization a 21 x lo-in. three-chime whistleto be applied from the brand-new section. The erection for the generators additionally the wiring ofthe whole plant were done by the companys em-ployes underneath the way of Mr. James Pagan, theelectrical and technical engineer of the company.The architectural plans associated with the energy house weredrawn by Mr. Fagan and all the construction workon the building was continued under their personaldirection. Great credit flow from Mr. Fagan for hiscareful study regarding the needs for the business and thesuccessful manner in which the new plant has actually fulfilledthe demands. The road railroad organizations of Tennessee are making prepara-tions to observe the Jim-Crow legislation passed at the current sessionof the Legislature, effective July 3rd, plus don’t anticipate a gflea:amount of trouble in complying along with its arrangements.

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BOILERS AND AUXILIARV APPARATUS, C. I. RV. CO. The contract for the power plant of Toledo, Port Clinton &Lakeside Electric Railway Co., which will be erected at Port Clin-ton. O., happens to be awarded to regional functions, and it’s also expected thatthe contractors will likely make quick progress. The non-public take into account the Adjustment of Damage reports. liv l)u. 11. 1!. Km KWELL, Manager Railway Adjusting Bureau, Cleveland, O. The vagaries of human instinct assert theinselves with morepersistence and be more stril<ingly conspicuous, when observedfrom the perspective associated with the claim adjuster compared to just about any otherrelation of life, for which men and women come into close and intimate con-tact with each other upon matters of company or policy; and of allthe idiosyncracics of this mind not one is much more connnon or dithcultof explanation as compared to preparedness and simplicity with which peoplelapse into lying if they were hurt through instru-mentality of a corporation or its servants, a person is virtually susceptible tnb

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Nice Car Loan photos

Check out these car loan images:

[Main Street from the Main and Martin Street Intersection]
car loan
Image by SMU Central University Libraries
Title: [Main Street from the Main and Martin Street Intersection]

Creator: Unknown

Date: ca. 1900

Series: Series 3: Photographs; Series 3, Subseries 5, Locations; Series 3, Subseries 5a, Dallas city views

Part of: George W. Cook Dallas/Texas image collection

Place: Dallas, Dallas County, Texas

Description: Photograph of Main Street, taken from the intersection of Main and Martin Street, facing West toward the Trinity River.

Physical Description: 1 photograph: gelatin silver; 23.6 x 19.4 cm on 25.3 x 20 cm mount

File: a2014_0020_3_5_a_0003_street_opt.jpg

Rights: Please cite DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University when using this file. A high-resolution version of this file may be obtained for a fee. For details see the sites.smu.edu/cul/degolyer/research/permissions/ web page. For other information, contact degolyer@smu.edu.

For more information and to view the image in high resolution, see: digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm/ref/collection/gcd/id/61/

View the George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection

Image from page 326 of “Pacific wine and spirit review” (1895)
car loan
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: pwsr34171895221895sanfrich
Title: Pacific wine and spirit review
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Viticulture Wine and wine making
Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: The Wine Librarians Association

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f this company, published in the daily papers, and that acopy of these resolutions be sent to his family. R. F. B.LicE, President. (iKo. W. Swi:.kik(;ex, Vice-President. The Supervisors of San Benito County have denied a peti-tion to reduce the county license from S300 to §200 per year.An ordinance has been passed designed to compel restanranteursto take out a saloon license. DIVIDEND NOTICE. The GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 526 California Street. For the lialf year euding June 30, 1895, a diviUeud has been declared at llic raleof four and eislit-tenths (4 8-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four (4)percent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after MondayJuly Isl, 1895. aEO. TOlKNY, Secretary. AVANTED.—A young man with eight j-ears experience inthe wine business wishes a position. Speaks English, German,French and some Spanish. Understands bookkeeping, and usestypewriter. Has traveled extensively. Best references. Ad-dress X, this oHlce.

Text Appearing After Image:
g IjISt E.REMYMARTIN&C? COGNAC 1 trance:) AGENTS IN SAN FRANCISCD.Cal. ■ „i.i::. 525 FRONT STREET. 8lnin;ionumi»lniiuwTffitut«ininil»il»tin»Wnft»>ml»nirT»l?.v>t».-Jr.iai^pi»ii»ivi>iiiHl^j 14 f/rSIfie WI|vlE /^p^D Sfll^IT F^EVIEW The business of George B. Cosby, jr.. tlic Sacramento w hole-saler, bas been sold at auction. J. Chai.f. of Hnin & Cliaix. Oakvilli. has leliirni-d iVom InsEastern trip, made iu tlie iutcrcsts of his linn. Carl Metzger, formerly of the Pomona Winery, has pur-chased thi Kind Winery, at Azusa, for 00. John 11. Wlieiler. of the Napa ^alley. has secured the con-tract to furnish the l-rench Hospital, of this city, witli its claret. William Dnoseof Woodland is under arrest for sellinff liiiuortJ a habitual drunkard after having received notice not todo so. Korbel Bros., of Guerneville, are shipping two car-loads aweek to their wine house in Chicago. They already have over100.000 gallons stored there. Dave Samson, for many years con

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Nice Debt photos

Check out these debt images:

Image from page 242 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
debt
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Identifier: belltelephone6667mag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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1957 and again in 1960,the amount of debt financing last yearreached an all-time high. Interest cost to Bell System com-panies varied from a low of 4.85 percent for a New York Telephone Com-pany offering in January to 6.03 percent that Pacific Telephone is payingfor a 0 million issue sold in No-ember. Other Bell System companies whichsold bonds last year include Ohio,Chesapeake and Potomac of Virginia,Mountain States, Southwestern,Chesapeake and Potomac of Wash-ington (D.C.), Northwestern, South-ern, and Southern New England. Inaddition, AT&T sold two 0 millionissues in 1966. Cardboard Computer Bell Telephone Laboratories has de-veloped a novel computer to helpstimulate high school students inter-est in physics. The CARDboard Illus-trative Aid to Computation — calledCARDIAC, for short — is a cardboardmodel which has the basic workingparts of an actual digital computer. It was designed by David W. Hagei-barger, a member of the InformationProcessing Research Departmentat

Text Appearing After Image:
Bell Laboratories, for use in The Man-Made World, a new program de-signed to improve the teaching of highschool science. With the aid of CARDIAC, studentsare becoming aware of the computer,not as a thinking machine, but as amachine responsive to mans instruc-tions. By following a red line path onthe plastic and cardboard model, stu-dents can follow steps taken by a com-puter in executing programs and canuse CARDIAC to solve problems. Theycan perform logical operations and seehow abstract concepts of logic can bemade concrete in circuits similar tothose used in computers. Thus, the cardboard computer givesthe student a working illustration ofprinciples discussed in Logic andComputers, the first phase of the ex-perimental course which was preparedby contributors to the EngineeringConcepts Curriculum Project. Five BellLabs engineers and scientists, profes-sors from a number of universities,and several high school science teach-ers are among those contributing tothe experiment, which is s

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Image from page 86 of “Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates;” (1
debt
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924019227044
Title: Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates;
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Moller, Helen Dunham, Curtis
Subjects: Dance Dance
Publisher: New York, John Lane company London, John Lane
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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nt andcan understand the cause that went before the fact. TheGreeks adored the human form, and most of all in grace-ful and vigorous action. Their dancing, more than anyother motive for physical expression, combined thesequalities. It did more than that. Lucian writes: Inthis art the functions of mind and body are united. Itexercises the limbs and at the same time employs theunderstanding; for in it nothing is done without wisdomand reason. Referring to emotional interpretations inthe Greek dance, Xenophon says: Nothing of the bodyshould be idle; the neck, limbs and hands must all bemade use of. When Demetrius witnessed a dancer,without any musical accompaniment, represent one ofthe old myths of the gods he cried out: I not only seeall you do, but even hear it also; for your hands seem tospeak to me! Fifty-three Classic perfection of repose, with one limb bearing the bodys weight whilethe other, with the knee flexed, preserves balance, is one of the Greekdancers earliest achievements.

Text Appearing After Image:
Our Debt to Classic Sculpture Dimly, perhaps, but still plainly enough to con-vince us of their truth, all these testimonies are corrob-orated in what is preserved to us o£ the sculpture of thatperiod. We who are earnest in our efforts to replacedancing upon its ancient foundation of truth and beautyshould therefore give constant study to the sculptureswhich so faithfully portray it. A modern close studentof the subject—John Warrack—has well written: Itwould be difficult to overestimate the value of dancingof so highly intellectualized a type in educating a nationin the elements of sculpture. The dancer had to repro-duce, with little if any external aid, the whole range ofhmnan thought and feeling in terms of bodily gestureand movement, and his art was closely followed and criti-cized by a crowd of keenly discriminating spectators, whocondemned any departure from the severest artisticseemliness and restraint. His physical conformation,his fairness of proportion and his condition

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Nice automobile Loan Speed pictures

Several nice automobile loan price pictures I found:

Image from web page 723 of “1913 Des Moines and Polk County, Iowa, City Directory” (1913)
auto loan rate
Image by online Archive Book Images
Identifier: 1913DesMoinesAndPolkCountyIowaCityDirectory
Title: 1913 Diverses Moines and Polk County, Iowa, City Directory
12 Months: 1913 (1910s)
Writers:
Topics: des moines iowa polk county city directories
Publisher:

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Sates and Machinery MovedMulberry advertisement liitk Struts Mmm, Wilwri 471 (1913) R. L. POLK & CO.S McP !a

Text Appearing After-image:
F W. SPR&GUE, Pres. 0. H. DAVISON, V.-Pres.T. H. KNOTTS. Sec*> Traditional Lifestyle Ins. Co OFFICE AT HOME: Seventh Floor Youngerman Block All Well-known kinds of Policies;Low Preminm prices fitter Harris-Em-Buchanan elk Wilkins Bros McNe-ney Mary Eery Co bds 1112 McNerney Mary F Co bds 947 8thMcNerney Michl P propr McNerney wash Towel provide Co clothes clnr 704 [Mulberry and 772 9th res 1101McNerney Patk J slsmn Family Shoe Stoije res es 58th 1 letter of HickmanMcNe -ney Peter B res 2316 e WalnutMcNerney Peter H prsmn bds 672 46tAMcNerney Simon P elk bds 811 Fll- moreMcNerney Thos B vehicle inspr M & St L R R res 1318 Penn avMcNerney Timothy J inspr City Eng res !l425 18thMcNEftNEY WALTER T Assi Sec Brown-Camp Hardware Co, res 913 5thMcNultv Alberta M stenog la Loan & Trust Co bds 1030 8thMcNulty Alphonso H trav Langan Brok Co res 1018 MapleMcNulty Anna A bds 1030 8thMcNulty Edith bds 1018 MapleMcNulty Fred O elk bds 1018 Maple McNu306 ty F E mngrClapp blk Coldren Land Co McNuilty Katheri

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Image from page 932 of “Annual report of Public Service Commission, and the … annual report associated with the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
car loan price
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreportofpu19152mass
Title: Annual report for the Public Service Commission, and … annual report for the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public-service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Yearly report
Topics: Massachusetts. Public-service Commission Public resources
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Year. Class of Inventory andAuthorization. Par Value. Money re-ceived asConsider-ation forIssue. Common stock: authorizationsclosed prior to current year. 312,000 ,000 812,000 ,000 ,000 Capital Inventory — Concluded. Prices and Dates op Declaration op Dividends during 12 months (including Rate per Cent per Annum and Dates of Maturity interesting on Debenture inventory, if any). Amountof Dividends declaredduring 12 Months. Amountof Dividends paidduring 12 Months. Jan. 18, 1915, 6per cent 0 00 0 00 Sundry present Liabilities.Loans and Notes Payable. Name of Creditor or ofObligation. Character of Liability or ofTransactions involved. Credit Balance at Close of the year. Whitin Machine Functions, ,000 00 1916. LINWOOD. 929 Depreciation, Road, Gear and Miscellaneous Physical Property. Balances at beginning of year: accrued decline, roadway and gear, traveler and combination automobiles, depreciation Techniques and frameworks, Balances at close of year: accrued decline, roadway and equipment, Total, CreditItems.

Text Appearing After-image:
,634 99 Bases of Depreciation Charges.Five percent on equipment. Two and one-half % on methods and frameworks. Profit-and-loss Report. Item. Debits. Credits. Credit balance at starting of fiscal duration, p. 927,Credit balance transmitted from income account, p. 929, Dividend appropriations of surplus, p. 929, Balance transported toward stabilize sheet, p. 927, 0 007,698 88 ,344 4174 47 complete ,418 88 ,418 88 Dividends declared during 12 months. Title of Securityon which Dividend Speed Per Cent(Regular). Par Valueof Amounton whichDividend wasdeclared. Amount ofDividend. Date. WAS DECLARED. Declared. Payable. Common stock, 6 ,000 0 00 January 18 At once. Earnings Report for Year. Item. Amount appropriate into Year. Comparison with Preceding Year(Enhance) running money.Railway working expenditures, p. 930, ,228 8915,448 21 ,034 31*50 08* fees assignable to railroad functions: 0 68651 51 4 23*35 68* Deductions from Gross Income.Interest on unfunded

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Image from web page 8 of “St. Louis globe-Democrat” (1909)
car finance price
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Identifier: stlouisglobedemo1219unse
Title: St. Louis globe-Democrat
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Lincoln, Mary Todd, 1818-1882
Publisher:
Adding Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Range
Digitizing Sponsor: Friends of The Lincoln Collection of Indiana, Inc.

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PATENT EXPERT STOVE REPAIRS. THE KENILWORTH. ^amilteii « I AMERICAN PLAr FINANCING ON FURNITURE. DESIRED — Bsperiencecwasher; use FamousFrancis and Cass. : LOAN MONEY LOW RATE FINANCIAL LOANS (^UITPiIN^,H!G^l^T■RF;^ UNITED STATES PLANEuropean Plan we FINE SHOP, __20xe0. | B tean3¥ee*cornee. We gcnrotrirf, ir?ban gmmhtg, jfchiiarg 12, CONSIDER ITl HOT-WATER HEJTEO HOMES!* * 00 ★ * NO MOREI NO LESSI in the event that you.want to borrow cash on St. LouisReal Estate our interest levels andcommission would be the cheapest. Answers to appli-cations given the following day or quicker. REAL-ESTATE DEPARTME,NT MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY ^^5.. PAYS 00 FRONT-FOOT CANDY BUILDING IS SOLD. HELPS FELLOW automobile TARGET WRECK ON BARRACKS LINE.

Text Appearing After-image:
St. fonts jflEiIrr (B1c1)t-gcntgcriTf, fvtbitri IHcrrmitg, jTrtrffinij n.^TO. NOTiCE TO VOTERS. ill Si; Mil sjiirsHrs-u Lin ?1: ty-rc/. 5 – TENNESSEE FIRMS COMING REPUBLICAN DELEGATIONS ACOUSTIcPROPERTWS OF NEW COU^^ TESTED AND HIGHLY SATISFACTORY. TREE PLANTING DAY SET. DOZIER ARRANGING TIMES. ELECTION INSTANCES ON TEST

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Nice Good Credit photos

A few nice good credit images I found:

Sipe water. Front of Hotel. (No Good)
good credit
Image by Mississippi Department of Archives and History
Collection: Painter (Milton McFarland, Sr.) Collection
Call number: PI/1988.0006
System ID: 98383.
Link to the catalog

Sipe water. Front of Hotel. (No Good).

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Scanned as tiff in 2008/04/07 by MDAH.

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Modoc break from north end. Good negative
good credit
Image by Mississippi Department of Archives and History
Collection: Painter (Milton McFarland, Sr.) Collection
Call number: PI/1988.0006
System ID: 98401.
Link to the catalog

Modoc break from north end. Good negative.

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Scanned as tiff in 2008/04/09 by MDAH.

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Updated Supersonic
good credit
Image by NASA on The Commons
This updated future aircraft design concept from NASA research partner Lockheed Martin shows a few changes from another concept seen eight images earlier in this gallery. It is a good example of how simulations and wind tunnel tests, conducted over time, generate data that tell researchers how to improve a design to achieve goals. The goals for a future supersonic aircraft are to produce a much lower-level sonic boom and to reduce emissions. The ultimate goal is to achieve a low enough boom that a current ruling prohibiting supersonic flight over land might be lifted.

Image credit: NASA/Lockheed Martin

Nice Annual Credit Report photos

A few nice annual credit report images I found:

Image from page 84 of “Annual report of the regents of the university on the condition of the State Cabinet of Natural History and the historical and antiquarian collection annexed thereto” (1850)
annual credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreportofr31850newy
Title: Annual report of the regents of the university on the condition of the State Cabinet of Natural History and the historical and antiquarian collection annexed thereto
Year: 1850 (1850s)
Authors: New York State Museum
Subjects: Science
Publisher: Albany, Regents of the University
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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y themselvesaccording to their tribal divisions ; the Wolf, Bear, Turtle, and Beavertribes, playing against the Deer, Snipe, Heron, and Hawk. Fromfifteen to thirty on a side are chosen, each taking from three to sixjavelins. The parties having stationed themselves several rods apart,upon opposite sides of a given line, a hoop or ring is rolled by one partyin front of the other, who throw their javelins at the ring as it passes.If the hoop is struck by one of them, the other party are required tostand in the place of the successful person and throw all their javelinsin succession at the ring. Those which hit are saved, and those whichfail are handed over to the other party, who in turn throw them at thering. Of this number, those which hit the hoop are won finally, andlaid out of the play; the balance are returned to their original owners.The successful party then rolls back the ring, and the game is thuscontinued until all the javelins upon one side are forfeited. Ga-ne-a, or Ball Bat

Text Appearing After Image:
5^ feet. This is the great game of the Indians. It is also of the highest an-tiquity, universal among, the Red races, and played with a zeal andenthusiasm which would scarcely be credited. In playing it they 80 denude themselves entirely, with the exception of the Ga-ka, or waistcloth, each one holding a hat, of the species represented in the figure.Gates are erected about sixty rods apart, upon opposite sides of afield, and the point in the game is, for each party to carry the hallthrough their own gate. Usually they have from six to eight on a sideto play the game, who are surrounded by a concourse of spectators.Commencing at the centre, each party strives to direct the ball towardstheir own gate, knocking it upon the ground or through the air; butmore frequently taking it up upon the deerskin net-work of the ball batand carrying it in a race towards the gate. When an opposite playerstrikes it ahead of the runner, the latter throws the ball over the headof the former towards the gat

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Image from page 67 of “The Mark Lane express, agricultural journal &c” (1832)
annual credit report
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Identifier: marklaneexpressa9319unse
Title: The Mark Lane express, agricultural journal &c
Year: 1832 (1830s)
Authors:
Subjects: Agriculture Farm produce Farm produce
Publisher: London : Isaac Alger
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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and foal,the silver medal offered by the Shire HorseSociety. About half a dozen good Hackneys with foalat foot, put in an appearance, the judges fixingtheir choice npon KJeleda, by Blue Peter III.,belonging to Mr. Ohas. Deverenx. Th?re was avery good class of Hackney foals. Contagious Diseases of Animals. Summary of Returns issued by th> Board of AiricuUwefor tk» uwi *Tvii«v» July 1. 1905 : – i Fever. ! Swine Slaughteredas Diseased or Ex-posed to Infection. °2Z X £ —iH ?1 H M if r- X Swine Outbreaks. . sio «Z M F- x x 117.* Outbreaks Reported. d :Z CO .£ •4 Otur Animls. 6 : z ■ 3 is Dcys. d : z • B -as? Inimils Attacked. ci =oZ 5 € — Outbreaks. . i—c ;iZ r- X O o — -~ ■»x c JS. • = 5 Animals Attacked. i :Z : : : e>- a Outbreaks. 6 : z • Anthrax. Animals Attacked. Z~ —. 5] x ^x Outbreaks. c —Z — dQ t— i— r: i- X * H – •ao i .•as■o . — s •£ = s v : i • S 3 a c 1* c II 9 U 62 MARK LANE EXPRESS. July 10,1905.

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Peterborough Show. The annual summer show of thi>s energetic aridprosperous, as well as useful, society, was heldon Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of lastweek, the weather proving exceptionally favour-able, and an excellent show resulted in everyway. Shire horses, which are always a strongfeature at these shows, were again very goodindeed. Hunters were also a very credit ableshow, more particularly as regards quality.Hackneys and driving horses were most conspicuous in the driving competitions. Cattlewere a good entry, and all the breeds (Short-horns, Lincoln Reds, Angus, and Red Polls)represented gave a very satisfactory account ofthemselves. Sheep and pigs were a small entry,these sections seldom being very well filled atthe shows of this society. Hunters. The catalogue commences with the hunters,of which, as stated, there were a number ofhorses, both adults and young stock, of very highcast. The first class was for weight-carryingbrood mares up to fourteen stone, of which nine

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Nice Customer Fraudulence pictures

A few great consumer scams photos I discovered:

Picture from page 92 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
consumer fraud
< img alt=" customer fraud" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14775885253_d75f2cee17.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Image by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14775885253"
> Internet Archive Publication Images Identifier:
belltelephonemag4344amerrichTitle: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbelltelephonemag4344amerrich" > Bell telephone publication Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1922" > 1922(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1920" > 1920s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorAmerican_Telephone_and_Telegraph_Company" > American Telephone as well as Telegraph Company< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorAmerican_Telephone_and_Telegraph_Company__Information_Dept" > American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Details Dept Topics:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectTelephone" > Telephone Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_New_York__American_Telephone_and_Telegraph_Co___etc__" > [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.] Adding Collection:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorPrelinger_Library" > Prelinger Library Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorInternet_Archive" > Internet Archive Sight Publication Page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/belltelephonemag4344amerrich/belltelephonemag4344amerrich#page/n92/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Audience Concerning This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/belltelephonemag4344amerrich" rel=" nofollow" >
Directory Entrance View All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbelltelephonemag4344amerrich" > All Images From Book Click right here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/belltelephonemag4344amerrich/belltelephonemag4344amerrich#page/n92/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view publication online to see this picture in context in a browseable online version of this publication. Text Showing up Before Photo: Fraud is a costly drainpipe on everybusiness. Only by an alertmanagement and a meticulously plannedprevention program can it be keptunder control. Below are some basicrules for avoidance that have provedsuccessful in the Bell System Text Appearing After Picture: Donald F. MacEachem, Chief Accountant Comptrollers Division, A.T. & T. Co. ■ All businesses are faced with fraudon the part of some

of their employ-ees, consumers
, distributors and also others out-side business. The telephone businessis no exception. Fraud is an expensive propo-sition. In lots of lines of business, dishon-esty could be including as high as 15 percentto customer costs. The FBI reports thatlosses from scams are 3 times as greatas the combined losses from all the bur-glaries, burglaries, vehicle burglaries as well as bankhold-ups in this country. Understood lossesfrom financial institution embezzlement in 1962 ex-ceeded 9 million dollars whereas bankhold-ups resulted in losses of concerning two-and-a-quarter million bucks. Certainly fraud is currently big business.It is no longer limited to kiting, forg-ing or easy cash controls. Itoften includes incredibly sophisticatedfalsification of big volumes of recordswith the outcome that the documents them-selves could not be counted after as a meansof uncovering scams. The Keep in mind Regarding Images Please keep in mind that these pictures are extracted from checked page images that could have been digitally boosted for readability- pigmentation and also look of these images may not flawlessly resemble the initial work. Photo from
web page 95 of” Scams
as well as fallacies of the Republican party.”( 1892 )< img alt=" consumer fraudulence" src= "https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14761428471_469d7c8d3b.jpg" width=" 400"/ > Picture by Net Archive Book Images Identifier: fraudsfalsehood00buck Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidfraudsfalsehood00buck” > Scams
as well as fallacies of the Republican
celebration. Year: 1892(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1890" >
1890s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorBuck__A___from_old_catalog_" > Dollar, A. [from old brochure] Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectRepublican_party" > Republican party< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectCampaign_literature__1892" > Campaign literature, 1892 Author:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_Chicago_and_Philadelphia__H__J__Smith___co__" > [Chicago and also Philly, H. J. Smith & co.] Contributing Collection: The Library of Congress Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorThe_Library_of_Congress" > The Library of Congress Sight Book Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/fraudsfalsehood00buck/fraudsfalsehood00buck#page/n95/mode/1up" rel= "nofollow ” >
BookVisitor About This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/fraudsfalsehood00buck" rel=" nofollow" > Magazine Entrance Sight All Images:< a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidfraudsfalsehood00buck" > All Photos From Publication Click on this link to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/fraudsfalsehood00buck/fraudsfalsehood00buck#page/n95/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view publication online to see this image in context in a browseable online
variation of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: sumers who comprise the fantastic body of theAmerican people and also pay the higher j) rices,
notwithstand-ing Republicans are always firmly insisting that foreigners pay thetariff tax obligation. As we have specified prior to ^ workers in manufact-uring worries must take part in the additional profitssecured to the mill males by high security. Yet laborersin those concerns need to not trick themselves right into thevain belief that ^ due to the fact that their employers are reapingimmense profits ^ they will be allowed to cooperate thembarely above malnourishment earnings. Each time the tariff israised the laborer, who is a customer, have to give up apart of his salaries to the owner in quantity equivalent to theadditional percent, levied upon the products which he pur-chases from safeguarded issues, for the reason that the lawrequires it. However there is no legislation or power which compelsthe mill proprietors to share their revenues with their workers, and also, as a general guideline, the even more they are preferred by dis-criminating legislation, the much more rapacious as well as ungener- Text Showing up After Photo: aw 00 PC Keep in mind About Pictures Please note that these images are removed from scanned web page images that could have been electronically boosted for readability- coloration and also appearance

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Nice Home Mortgage pictures

Some cool home mortgage photos:

Image from page 68 of “Olcott’s land values blue guide of Chicago” (1921)
mortgage loan
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Identifier: olcottslandvalue261936geoc
Title: Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago
12 Months: 1921 (1920s)
Writers: Geo. C. Olcott & Co
Topics: Real home Real property Real home Real property Zoning
Publisher: Chicago : Geo. C. Olcott
Adding Library: The Newberry Library
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and analysis Libraries in Illinois

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!ar- -ag- -gg- Tag- ;a g^ atE -3 g a gJ y L. M. Willis & Co. Real-estate ^ ^ Specializing in Central Business Property y i H 110 South Dearborn St. I phone Randolph 1046 â gg ^g- ^g -ae- -ag- -ag -ag -gg– 123 SEVERAL YEARS OF PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE The five active members of this firm have actually each spent from 17to 35 years in actual building managementâa total of 123 many years! AN AUDIO FINANCIAL BACKGROUND this business doesn’t have investments and its own activities tend to be confinedto property administration, product sales and insurance coverage. Its economic in-⢠tegrity is unquestioned. A FRESH STANDARD OF PROVIDER a professional, sound and progressive company provides youreal property managementâworthy of the name. SWAN, LORISH & CASPERS, Inc. KENWOOD WORKPLACE *^*«*«»*«^ *200 ^qODLAWN OFFICE953 E. 47th St. 1300 E. 63rd St. HYDE PARK WORKPLACE ⢠Hence. SHORE WORKPLACE 1501 E. 53rd St. ^ 1959 E. 71st St. wm.c.Heinemann&Co. PropertyManagement 1st Mortgages Real Estate Insurance 10 S. Los Angeles Salle St.Ran. 2347-8

Text Appearing After-image:
was i S.BLEV ^i-Yf^. 171 ^ St ^ o fi ^ 3 > £ A£l i 2 ^< an age < i^ c -s ,n 9 ,^ t IjJA^A^ home loan CorrespondentThe life insurance coverage Company of Virginia BESTER P. COST BUSINESS 120 S. Los Angeles SALLE ST. CENTRAL 6365 Promot attention to agents submissions A 70 INDEX TO STREETS STREET AT Attott Ct N 700 W Aberdeen St S IIOO ,V Academy Ct S 811 W Ada St H 1300 Ada St S 1350 iV Adams St E 200 S Adams St W 200 S Addison St W 3600 N Agatlte At » 4450 N Alnslle St W 4900 U Alrdrle pi W 4138 N Alaska St .1 1550 N Altany Av N 3100 W Altany Av S 3100 W Albert St S 1450 W Albion At ff 6500 N Aldine At .V 3300 N Aldine Sq E (altered to E. Alexander St W 2275 S Algonquin At II 5600 IV Alice Pi .7 1650 N Allen AT N 3400 .V Allport St S 1260 W Almond St S 3100 W ilta Vista Ter 11…1075 W Altgeld St W 2500 S Anoona St W 675 H Anson Pi W 425 N Anthony At S 400 3 Arbor pi ff 375 N Arcade Pi W 50 S Arch St S 1300 W Archer At S 1 w Archer At W 5500 S Ardmore At H 5800 N Argyle St W 5000 N Arli

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Nice American Express photos

Check out these us express images:

Image from page 272 of “Industrial reputation for america, through the earliest settlements to the current time: being a complete review of American industries, embracing farming and horticulture; such as the cultivation of cotton fiber, tobacco, grain
american present
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Identifier: industrialhistor00boll
Title: Industrial reputation for the United States, through the earliest settlements to the present time: being a total survey of US industries, embracing farming and horticulture; including the cultivation of cotton fiber, cigarette, wheat; the raising of ponies, neat-cattle, etc.; all important manufactures, delivery and fisheries, railroads, mines and mining, and oil; in addition a brief history associated with coal-miners and the Molly Maguires; finance companies, insurance, and commerce; trade-unions, hits, and eight-hour movement; and a description of Canadian sectors
12 Months: 1878 (1870s)
Authors: Bolles, Albert Sidney, 1846-1939
Topics: Industries Industries
Publisher: Norwich, Conn. : The Henry Bill club. Business
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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ab-surd in extreme, has ex-erted a material effect uponthe product sales of this manufactur-ers of arms. Halls breech – loadingweapons never emerged intogeneral usage. Their concept wasvaluable ; but he could notgive it useful kind. Prus-sia preceded the UnitedStates, for that reason of their army. Dreyse had perfected a breech-loading gun in 1836, where an extended slug-likebullet had been discharged through a rifled barrel exPenments-by means of a cartridge done up in paper, and containinga fulminate at its base ; the fulminate being exploded bythe shock of a blunt needle entering through a tiny holein the breech-plate. In 1841 Prussia place sixty thousandof these rifles with cast-steel drums in to the fingers of the woman army, one hun-dred guys in each battalion being built with them. In 1848 theywere distributed to the whole military. The master called all of them inside the decree a unique dispensation of Providence for strengthening of our nationalresources, and indicated the hope that the system are kept key until

Text Appearing After-image:
in enabling a breech-loader into the hands Prussian in-ventions and INDUSTRIAL HISTORY the great component which it’s destined to try out in history may couple it with theglory of Prussian arms and also the extension of kingdom. The beat of theAustrians at Sadowa in 1866 offered the needle-gun a great celebrity. Needle-gun. . ° ° » and induced all the governments around the globe to improve theirmuzzle-loaders and smooth bores for a more modern type of gun. Abetter firearm as compared to Ziindnadelgewehr of Prussia had, but already been inventedin the usa in 1852 by Sharp of Philadelphia. The breech-pin inSharps this tool was pulled listed below the barrel utilizing the trigger-weapon, guard as a lever, making the barrel open on breech. The ball-cartridge being placed, the breech-pin was thrown back again to its spot by closingthe trigger-guard to its destination. The sharp top side of the breech-pin cutoff the report end of the cartridge, therefore leaving the dust in the today closedbarrel confronted with the fi

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Image from page 120 of “daily ways for American girls and boys” (1922)
american express
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Identifier: everydaymannersf00phil
Title: On A Daily Basis manners for American girls and boys
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Writers: Philadelphia. South Philadelphia high school for women. [from old catalog]
Topics: Etiquette
Publisher: New York, The Macmillan business
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ituation is never assisted by losing people mood. Atsuch a time attempt to keep your poise; you will discover thatyou can accomplish more and better work.If reproved for poor work, or fixed in a blunder,apologize for the work and show your gratitudefor the modification. Give your vow for betterresults in the future. Never sulk, nor attempt to excuseyourself, nor waste time in lengthy explanations. Theo. point usually a mistake is ry, ry once again. made hence it will never take place once more. Does it not seem far better to state BUSINESS MANNERS 103 — Oh, we see I was incorrect; Im sorry. Many thanks forpointing out my mistake/—than, Oh, really, thats whatI suggested,—you see, someone interrupted me while I wasat run that, but we understood, of course, that which was right,or, No, I never ever will have done that when somebodyhadnt butted in, etc. If you’re a stenographer, and your manager asksthat you take some letters, visit him rapidly andquietly, along with needed materials. If he is nearly

Text Appearing After-image:
Dress suitably; dont degrade your party clothes in the office. ready, sit completely still until he could be willing to begin. Youwill help him by refraining from tapping a floor withyour foot or perhaps the table together with your pen, or from arrangingyour hair or choosing at your fingernails, or doing any one of thoselittle items that often distract the interest. You’ll, at some point, be asked to report the proceed-ings of a committee meeting. Whether or not themembers associated with committee tend to be seated when you enter theroom, stay standing until a spot is suggested for you. 104 DAILY WAYS whenever brand new situations arise, make use of your common senseand great wisdom, keeping in mind to call upon all yourpast experiences that will help you when you look at the answer of them. Whatever your situation may be, the abilityto work amicably in an organization is a decided asset in busi-ness. A kindly toleration for the views of other individuals,and for ways of working distinct from your own, willhelp to make you a more acceptable coworker. If you should be a newc

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Image from web page 749 of “The United states encyclopedia and dictionary of ophthalmology Edited by Casey A. Wood, assisted by a sizable staff of collaborators” (1913)
american express
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Identifier: encyclopediaopth06wood
Title: The Us encyclopedia and dictionary of ophthalmology Edited by Casey A. Wood, assisted by a sizable staff of collaborators
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Wood, Casey A. (Casey Albert), 1856-1942
Subjects: Ophthalmology
Publisher: Chicago : Cleveland Press

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s of Ernest Clarke, whichcontains spherical and cylindrical contacts in eigiitiis of a dioptre to1.00 D., in quarters to 5.00 D., and in half dioi)tres to 20.00 D. Thisextensive assortment of contacts, togetlier witli pi-isius. etc. is containedin an instance, measuring 26 by 22 indies. As an invaluable inclusion to tlie completeness of fhc tiial lens put, thefolding tinted lens combo (see figure) is an iinpoi-tant asset. 4730 STUDY OF THE EYE The recofjnizcd valut of linttd eye-glass and spectacle contacts has actually ledto their basic work, and oculists are generally consulted asto the appropriate tone is worn. The group of fronts making up thetrial ready illustrated herewith, tend to be of great price in assisting thephysician and his patient in identifying just what color provides the bestresult in just about any certain situation. The structures, four in number, tend to be of tough plastic and contain one paireach Amber # 1, Amber No. 2, Euphos #1 and Euphos No. 2.When not being used, the set is folded into small compass.

Text Appearing After-image:
Folilino- Tinted Lens Sot. The first contacts useful for o])hth;iliiiic i»urposes had been numbered accord-ing into radius of curvature of tool on which these people were ground,both areas having the exact same cui-vature. Aided by the glass commonlyemployed included it just happened lliat for smli a lens, the number indi-cating the radius of curvature in inches additionally suggested approximatelythe wide range of ins of the i)rincipal focal distance. Such a .systemthe energy associated with the lens was always expressed by a fraction—onedivided by the focal distance of lens. Hence, tlie IS-incli lens luula strength of 1/18. In incorporating contacts in pi-actical work, it becomes necessary to addand subtract the strengtlis associated with the lenses combined. Such calculationsmust be manufactured continuously for each eye that is tested, in addition to difficulty EXAMINATION OF THE EYE 4731 of including and subtracting fractions make it a matter of severe im-portance. Minor objections to your old system of numbering were the variationsof ins in

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Nice Credit Fraud photos

Check out these credit fraud images:

Image from page 972 of “History of Utah: comprising preliminary chapters on the previous history of her founders, accounts of early Spanish and American explorations in the Rocky Mountain region, the advent of the Mormon pioneers, the establishment and di
credit fraud
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Identifier: historyofutahcom03whit
Title: History of Utah: comprising preliminary chapters on the previous history of her founders, accounts of early Spanish and American explorations in the Rocky Mountain region, the advent of the Mormon pioneers, the establishment and dissolution of the provisional government of the State of Deseret, and the subsequent creation and development of the territory
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Whitney, Orson F. (Orson Ferguson), 1855-1931
Subjects: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mormons Mormons Mormon Church Mormons
Publisher: Salt Lake City, Utah : G. Q. Cannon & Sons Co.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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due to frauds whereby, at the Bingham precinct thirteen illegalvotes had been received for Allen, while at South Cottonwood sixteenvoters who would have cast their ballots for Ferguson had had theirnames wrongfully stricken from the registration lists. Mr. Fergu-sons attorney asked that these sixteen votes be accepted, and thatthe returns from Bingham be thrown out. In the case of Mr. Toronto, between whom and Mr. Galligher atie vote was reported, a discrepancy in the returns indicated thatToronto ought to have been credited with several more votes thanthose counted for him. His attorney asked that the ballot box bereferred to in order to decide the question. In the case of Mr. Rumel it appeared that his majority overColonel Page could only be maintained by counting for one and thesame person certain votes certified in the lists as having been castfor John H. Rumel, Jr., and other votes accredited to John H. Rumel;the difference being due to a clerical error on the part of one or more

Text Appearing After Image:

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Image from page 532 of “Life and times of Stevens Thomson Mason, the boy governor of Michigan” (1920)
credit fraud
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Identifier: lifetimesofstev00hema
Title: Life and times of Stevens Thomson Mason, the boy governor of Michigan
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Hemans, Lawton Thomas, 1864-1916 Michigan. Historical Commission
Subjects: Mason, Stevens Thomson, 1811-1843
Publisher: Lansing, Michigan Historical Commission
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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lay, and spoke in just words of praise of cer-tain institutions, which had sustained themselves withhonor and credit amid so many temptations and exam-ples of fraud; it unanimously recommended the repealof the general banking law, and with like unanimityjoined with the Governor in the recommendation of theincorporation of a State bank, under the control of theState itself, which they urged should be subject at alltimes to the most rigid scrutiny, and to the strictestguard against the tendency of banks to lend too muchand put too many notes in circulation, which theydeclared to be the fruitful source of so much evil. Some authors, biased by partisan fervor, have soughtto take sentences from the Governors message to theLegislature of 1839, and use them as proof that he hadstood sponsor for a system that had brought the Stateto the verge of bankruptcy and ruin. The message bearsno such construction. In it the Governor said, No Stateperhaps, has suffered more from the evils of a deranged

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CHARLES E. STUARTKalamazoo lawyer and politician. Mem-ber of the state Legislature in 1842, laterin Congress, and holder of many publicoffices o£ trust.

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Image from page 561 of “An American history” (1919)
credit fraud
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Identifier: americanhistory00step
Title: An American history
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Stephenson, Nathaniel W. (Nathaniel Wright), 1867-1935
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston, New York [etc.] Ginn and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ORY politics and denounced the administration as excessivelycorrupt.^ 687. The Election of 1876. The effect of the Fifth Ave-nue Conference was seen in the Republican national con-vention. Ail the enemies of Blaine combined to securethe nomination of Rutherford B. Hayes, governor of Ohio,a moderate politician pledged to the reform of the civilservice. His nomination, however, did not satisfy all themembers of the conference. The two leaders parted com-pany. Though Schurz decided toremain with the Republicans andsupport Hayes, Adams went overto the Democrats and supportedtheir candidate, Samuel J. Tilden,of New York, a fearless man of highcharacter who had made a greatname fighting ofiicial corruption inNew York City.^ By this time, eight of the recon-structed states had thrown off therule of the carpetbaggers, andthese with a number of states inthe North and West supportedTilden, giving him an electoral vote of 184. The remainingstates, except three, were carried by Hayes who received

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RUTHERFORD B. HAYES * Several notorious scandals had contributed to form a general impressionthat the public service was honeycombed with fraud. It was proved that a cor-poration known as the Credit Mobilier had bribed members of Congress to votefor bills favoring its interests. The secretary of war, W. W. Belknap, was im-peached for fraud and narrowly missed being convicted. On the other hand,the secretary of the treasury, B. M. Bristow of Kentucky, showed himself anable and uncompromising reformer by hunting down and bringing to punish-ment the members of the Whisky Ring — a secret association of distillers andfederal officers that was extensively defrauding the government. Bristow wasthe first choice of the liberal Republicans for President. * He broke up the infamous Tweed Ring, a conspiracy of corru[it ix)liti-cians which robbed the city, through fraudulent contracts, of some 0,000,000.The head of it was sent to the penitentiary. RECONSTRUCTION 489 from them 172 electoral vo

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