Image from page 477 of “Mirror, 1908” (1908)

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Image from page 477 of “Mirror, 1908” (1908)
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Identifier: mirror190800unse
Title: Mirror, 1908
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: yearbooks
Publisher: Bates College
Contributing Library: Bates University, Edmund Muskie Archives and Special Selections Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS People and Sloan Foundation

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en we sang and chatted a few more And later we cheered.We set-up 1908 steen times, and managers and capsThen piled to the Turner vehicle And hung to the straps. jimmy had an odd desire To be, what exactly is known as, passed away straight back,And so we made it happen, as if hed been Upon an air line track.One other stated, hed like sound Of crackling, breaking glass,So we formed in soccer style And rushed the door, en masse. When Phoebus gan his head to raise. We got back to Parker Hall.Ask Cussie and Doc that which we did to them. They might maybe not let you know all. Ah ! Such a night! Oh ! Such an occasion !Will we previously see another. Maybe some cool, November night as time goes by football weather.Again really poke the turn on brilliant And remain and smoke cigarettes together.And talk of these old college days When Shu had been Cap, and WilderAnd Cyrus smoked the vile Qboid And McCool something more gentle. One of the occasions of the season very long becoming remem-bered the enjoyable we’d, ended up being if the dormgirls entertained the men at the gym. Never ever performed

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o8 have actually a much better time. Junior self-esteem and col-lege cares were forgotten when you look at the life and enjoyable ofCountry supermarket, Tucker, and Seven in andSeven Out. Later on, whenever our ideas turnedtoward the chafing dishes, something over apassing interest ended up being evinced because of the young men in theculinary plans. Several spoon wassturdily, though deftly wielded by a masculinehand, and captain Shu ended up being discovered beatingeggs, as carefully intention upon his task as thoughit have been the plannings of a football campaign.Even now as we read once again the supper cards, weseem to get the appetizing aroma of rarebit, andfeel again the pangs of appetite that it developed after that. Ill present a hint —For a rarebit To skip Knox or Miss Blanchard youll go.Miss Shorey will giv-e you creamed chicken And chicken is great we all know !Miss Melcher tends to make Mexican Rarebit, Miss Jones has shrimp wiggle for you.Creamed salmon is served by skip Wentworth — Go pass in your order for two. Although our course through the Juni

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Image from web page 273 of “Canada, the empire of North; being the romantic tale associated with brand new dominion’s growth from colony to kingdom” (1909)
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Identifier: canadaempireofno00laut
Title: Canada, the empire regarding the North; becoming the enchanting tale of brand-new dominion’s development from colony to kingdom
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Writers: Laut, Agnes C. (Agnes Christina), 1871-1936
Topics: Canada — History
Publisher: Boston, London : Ginn and organization
Adding Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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h of Lake Champlain, then get across through the woods to Johnsons fort. Dieskauchose the second trail.Leaving half their males toguard the baggage,Dieskau bade fifteenhundred picked menfollow him on swiftestmarch with provisionsin haversack for onlyeight times. September8, 10 a.m., the marchersadvance through thewoods on Johnsons fort,when out of the blue theylearn that their particular scout haslied, —Johnson himselfis still at the fort. In-stead of five-hundred arefour thousand English.Advancing along thetrail V-shape, regulars inthe center, Canadians and Indians for each side, the French comeon a business of five-hundred English wagoners. In wildmelee of shouts the English escape in a rabble. Pursue!March ! hire ! Force the spot ! yells Dieskau, dashing forwardsword in hand, thinking to check out so closely from the pumps of therabble he can enter the English fort before the adversary know;but his Indians have forsaken him, and Johnsons scouts haveforewarned the approach of the French, as opposed to ambushing

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SIR WILLIAM JOHNSON DIESKAU DEFEATED ■39 THE SPOT for the English, Dieskau locates his own military ambushed. He hadsneered in the un-uniformed plow-boys of the English. Themore you can find, the greater we shall kill, he previously boasted ; butnow he discovers that the rude bushwhackers, just who fought likeboys each morning, at noon fought like men, by afternoonfought like devils.Their sharpshooterskept up a collision of fireto the fore, and fifteenhundred doubled on therear of his army, fold-ing united states up, he reported,like a pack of cards.Dieskau fell, shot in theleg plus the leg, anda bullet hit the cart-ridge box of this servantwho had been cleansing outthe injuries. Lay my telescopeand layer by me personally, and go!ordered Dieskau. Thisis as good a deathbed asany spot. Go! he thun-dered, witnessing their secondofficer hesitate. Dontyou see you might be required ?Go and appear a retreat. A 3rd shot pene-trated the wounded com-manders kidney. Lying alone, propped against a tree, he heardthe drums moving a retreat, when one of

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Image from page 423 of “Railway and locomotive manufacturing : a practical record of railroad motive power and rolling stock” (1901)
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Identifier: railwaylocomotiv14newy
Title: Railway and locomotive engineering : a practical log of railroad motive energy and rolling stock
12 Months: 1901 (1900s)
Writers:
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair Co
Adding Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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method andrepeated right back another, additionally the mistake notbe found. of Chicago. These are typically nonetheless using the sys-tem at New Orleans alongside ter-minals. American Locomotives in Asia. Although the foreign outcry has actually becomerather a matter of old record by thistime, nonetheless the following criticism by anengineer of an Indian road is quite in-teresting and evidently quite honest. Thepoint we cannot realize is the allegedhard cycling. Whenever Pennsylvania roadwas tinkering with the Webb com- viewpoint from connection with an Indianengine driver. The B. B. & C. I. Railway in 1899 re-ciuired mail motors; owing to the engin-eers hit in England, the tenders weresubmitted to an American firm, Baldwin& Co., nevertheless the company persistently declined toaccept any design, preferring to erect themin their own practices. Ten Yankees arrived on the scene to Bombay at acost of i200 less than any firm in Englandwould have actually recharged. The engines were shortly erected. We canassure my visitors they were rather a curi-

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w ESTixi.iiiM^K Fnii;n> in tiik ki.kctkicity building. Assistant Superintendent Jones said thatthere must certanly be two circuits—one for thetrain despatcher to communicate their or-ders, the other a nearby circuit between theblock providers. The movement of trainsby telephone is through signalsand perhaps not written requests, aside from clear-ance, permissive and caution cards, whichwould be applied as circumstances needed. The actual only real purchase that a train should re-ceive should really be one ordering it to movefrom one block to another; trains that areon time should be let alone. The Illinois Central Railroad used thetelephone for operating trains on St.Charles air-line throughout the year thatthese tracks were being raised into the town lb No. 1320, Wes Hartman (whogot more out of the woman than anyone else)shook down about 30 weight of avoirdupoisand he didnt have any to free, either.If these Indian motors ride worse thanthis there is something wrong together with them.some tips about what he claims into the Raihvay Time

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Image from page 19 of “The Farm-poultry” (1901)

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Image from page 19 of “The Farm-poultry” (1901)
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Identifier: farmpoultry1224unse
Title: The Farm-poultry
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Poultry Northeastern States Periodicals Poultry Industry Northeastern States Periodicals
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : I.S. Johnson and Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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or varieties,with provision made for recording of muchother data besides the number of eggs pro-duced. Opposite the record sheet for eachmonth is a page of Timely Notes. Thepart of the book devoted to advertising theHumphrey machines is also interesting, andthe book as a whole is a dignified and credit-able piece of advertisjng. Sliarples Cre.tm SepiiiMtoi-s make cows pay. Book,Business Dairj ing aud Cat249 free. W. Cliester, Pa. WINNING WINNINGS TODAY, The shows can not begin too early or be too big to find Dustons White Wyandottes In tlie winnings. Already tills fall lias his stock called time on llie competitors of liis cusldiners, IN THE LAKGE.ST AS WELL AS THE SMALLER SHOWS OF THE COUNTRY. AVltli more than 3000 select to select dont you think he can turn the trick for vou ? Can also mate youpairs, trios or pens lo produce exhibition and breeders. Write your wauts aud send 5c. sLimp for handsomestIoultry catulojiue puljlisliod. ARTHUR G. DUSTON, 223 East Main St., Marlboro, Mass.

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■the: National Fruit Grower Is the Largest Horticultural and Fruit Trade Pub-lication West of New York. Published monthly at ST. JOSEPH, MICHIGAN iinuiBifflt and the final sale in the market. It^ tells the prowerB who they may safe-? ly send their goods to In the citiesnpnfelofthe country, puardl them from^ Trees and Plants and Treatment ofiSi;! l| ■ ■rthe wiles of snide commiB«ion<Ct fame. You will like it, if vou grow-n-i-U ill 3 : houses, and Rives just the informa- i^J o «r «ir,o iifioiia tt-Tth PiPi-r-rlinU aISBw r tion the grower needs, whelher he 1631-he an amateurorprofesRlonsl. Iub-iield to the market, includini: vari-^ – lishes market reports from difTerent eties, cultivation, tranBportation, ;iiiintiir«ii;iMiiniii]iiniiiii:iiiii h i i cities, giving a summary of prices. Keeps you pooled on Horticulture, 2 iJHCrop ConditionB. Irices of Fruit rWl Products In the nillerent Markets, ^Nljh.Vi{ Fruit Trade Matters; Diseases of^ . Trees and Plants and Treatment of iSC

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Image from page 134 of “Report of the Commission of 1906 to Investigate the Condition of the Blind in the State of New York” (1907)
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Identifier: reportofcommissi00unse
Title: Report of the Commission of 1906 to Investigate the Condition of the Blind in the State of New York
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: J. B. Lyon Company, State Printers
Contributing Library: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc., M. C. Migel Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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twenty-one years of age, so that theadults, who are so greatly in the majority, could not enter if theywould; and it may well be supposed that but few would become in-mates of them, if they could. The plan of home teaching is, there-fore, a necessity for the adults, and emj)loyment could easily befound for a dozen more teachers, to search out and teach the blindof Pennsylvania alone. This Society devotes its efforts, free of charge, to the blindof all classes, without distinction of age, sex, color, nationality, orreligion The lot of the blind is indeed a sad one! Added to theiraffliction, oftentimes, is a dependence upon friends or relativesfor support; and it is no uncommon experience that blind per-sons have literally to sit in darkness and solitude, with nothingto occupy them but their own thoughts. But a change comes oer the scene when the embossed typeis handed to the blind ones by the home teacher, who comes witha word of cheer — Lighting up the darkness,Scattering the gloom.

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nO.MK IhAllIIXC ] ni; Tin; III.INII ]1Y A SIGHTLESS TEACHER. New York Association for the Blind. Commission on the Blind. 65 Despondency gives way to hope and joy soon follows, as theytrace the simple embossed characters, and, after one or twolessons, are able once more to read for themselves. This society is supported by annual subscriptions, direct con-tiibutions, legacies and donations, which amounted in 1905 to,422.46. Of this amount ,577.82 was disbursed, the balancebeing placed to the credit of the general, the publication, and thefemale teachers funds. The society paid 0 for the maleteachers salary and traveling expenses and 9.35 for those ofthe lady teacher. The secretary of the Commission attended the annual meetingof the Society in January, 1907, when similar reports were givenfor the past year. These reports showed a steady growth in thework of the Society, an increase in the number of persons in-structed and in the circulation of embossed literature. Thus, for th

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Image from page 26 of “Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania” (1899)
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Identifier: reportofbureauof1898penn
Title: Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines
Subjects: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines Coal mines and mining
Publisher: [Harrisburg] : The Bureau
Contributing Library: The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nrivalled coking coal fields, containedwiihin the Blairville basin, from Jacobs creek, its northern bound-ary, to Uniontown and Fairchance, without a break, or from its vastand practically untouched gas and steam coal territory held withinthe Lisbon trough, between the Youghiogheny and Monongahelarivers, this county, or at least its western half, is destined to be-come a vast supply station from which thousands of tons of highgrade fuel wealth are to be distributed far and wide, to meet the wantsof distant communities. This Connellsville seam of coal yields from 8 to 10 feet of work-able coal. The coal is clean, almost free from slate and sulphur, re-markably soft, easily mined and uniform in quality and thickness.The purity of this coal and its chemical and physical characteristicsuTake it peculiarly adapted for coking and gives it great value. It iseasily mined, and cokes with but little care. It is this ease of mining and coking that makes it possible to put coke from this districl

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Coking Pnrrss No. 11. BUREAU OF MINES. xxi iu competition with cokes and fuels in the juost distant parts ofthe United States. History and Growth. During the past quarter of a century many of our largest indus-tries have made their most noticeable advancement, yet none hasmade more rapid strides or been of greater importance and valuethan tlie manufacture of coke. The date of the first production ofcoke is iu doubt. By some authorities it is claimed that it was usedin the United States some years prior to 1770. Be this as it may,the best authenticated history gives Isaac Meason credit for thefirst production of coke in the Connellsville region. In 181G and 1817he built the first rolling mill erected west of the Allegheny moun-tains, at Ilumsock, Fayette county, and this mill went into opera-tion in September of the latter year. The coke was used in the re-hneiy and was made in Fayette county. In 1836, F. H. Oliphantbegan the use of coke as a fuel in Fairchance Furnace. From abouttiiat

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Image from page 223 of “The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society” (1898)

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Identifier: journalofamerica00amer
Title: The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: American-Irish Historical Society
Subjects: American-Irish Historical Society Irish Americans Ethnology
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : The Society
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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nd ProfessorRogers was chosen President. Associated with him during allits struggles for organization, were many of Massachusetts mosteminent scientists and educators. In 1864, Professor Rogers, in writing to his brother, mentionsthe admirable lectures of Henry Giles, the noted Irish-Americanlecturer and essayist, delivered in Boston. Professor Rogers, never very strong, was obliged to take oceantrips, and was much sought by foreign colleges for addresses onscientific subjects. His correspondence with James RussellLowell and Eliot, later President of Harvard, shows the esteemin which he was held by these gentlemen. On June 1st, 1870, he resigned as President of the Institute onaccount of ill health; and, while addressing the graduation classof the Institute in 1882, suddenly dropped, and was dead in ashort time. Few men in any walk of life had more glowing and gracefultributes paid them by men of eminence and prominence, thanWilliam B. Rogers, the son of an Irish emigrant and patriot.

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JOHN DOYLE. Reproduction by Anna Frances Levins LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. 197 William B. Rogers and his brothers lived splendid and usefullives, and no better monument could be placed to the credit ofany man than the internationally known Massachusetts Instituteof Technology. LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. The following letter was written by the father of the lateJohn T. Doyle of Menlo Park, California, upon his arrival in theUnited States an emigrant from Ireland. The original letter wasgiven by Miss Doyle, a granddaughter of John Doyle, to RichardC. OConnor, Esq., of San Francisco, Vice-President-General ofthis Society. In sending to the Journal a copy of the San Fran-cisco Monitor of February 8th, 1913, in which the letter waspublished, Mr OConnor writes: John Doyle was a native of Kilkenny, Ireland. He was theson of Edmond Doyle, who had joined the United Irishmen in1798, whose home was wrecked, and whose family was scatteredamong various relatives. John Doyle leaves many descendantsand relati

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Image from page 188 of “New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions” (1889)
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Identifier: bedfordmassac00newb
Title: New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.). Board of Trade Pease, Zeph. W. (Zephaniah Walter), b. 1861 Hough, George A Sayer, William L. (William Lawton), 1848-1914
Subjects:
Publisher: [New Bedford] Mercury publishing company, printers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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;^ high, with a monitor roof, and four hundred by one hundredfifty feet in area, while the picker and dye house is two hundred thirtyby fifty-two feet in area. The mill is provided with five thousand spindles, sixty-threebroad looms ninety-five and one hundred ten inches in width, andtwelve sets of cards. The machinery is operated by a two hundredfifty-two horse power Harris-Corliss engine, with three six-foot boilers,made by Cunningham, of Boston. Between seven hundred thousand and eight hundred thousandpounds of wool are worked annualh, and the cloth is made here andcolored in the wool and piece. The annual product is about eighthundred thousand yards of cloth, and one hundred sixty-five handsare employed. The officers of the corporation are as follows ; President — Loum Snow, Jr. Treasurer—Robert Snow. Directors — Edward D. Mandell, Charles W. Plummer, FrederickS. Allen, Charles W. Clifford. George S. Homer, Thomas H. Knowles,and Loum Snow, Jr. •t/-vy V ■i;fZ

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INDUSTRIAL AND FINANCIAL. 173 THE MANUFACTURE OF OIL. To mention New Bedford without devoting some space to her oilmanufactories would be to neglect the genius of the lamp, and toomuch credit cannot be given this industry for the present position ofthis city. William A. Walls interesting picture of The Origin of the Whale-tishery, which now hangs in the parlors of the home of the late Mrs.Charles W. Morgan, contains an illustration of the first oil factory inNew Bedford. It consisted merely of a trypot under an old shed bythe shore. Near by stands a man pouring oil from a long handleddipper into a wooden-hooped barrel. Another is handling over theblubber, while a third is coopering a barrel. The latter is engagedin conversation with an Indian who is seated upon a broken mast.On the shore, keeled over on her side, is one of the small sloopsemplo3ed in whaling at that time, and the river lies outstretched inthe background. Seated upon the frame of a grindstone, and giving directions toa

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Image from page 256 of “Collins’s peerage of The united kingdomt; genealogical, biographical, and historic” (1812)

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Image from web page 256 of “Collins’s peerage of The united kingdomt; genealogical, biographical, and historical” (1812)
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Identifier: collinsspeerageo_08coll
Title: Collins’s peerage of The united kingdomt; genealogical, biographical, and historical
12 Months: 1812 (1810s)
Writers: Collins, Arthur, 1682?-1760 Brydges, Egerton, Sir, 1762-1837
Subjects: Nobility
Publisher: London, Printed for F.C. and J. Rivington, Otridge and Son [etc.]
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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, one of thesenators of college of justice, and contains a son, John Stewart. Which Sir George Stewart, today of Grandtully, Bart, is married withDame Agnes Cockburn, child of Sir Archibald Cockburn, of Langton,Bart. NiiLets Hernldry,ut suj>ra. Colonel John Stewart, the second boy right here pointed out, which afterwardssucceeded toward Baronetage, hitched, secondly. Lady Jane Douglas, above-mentioned, and ended up being parent by the woman for the present Lord Douclas. 248 PEERAGE OF THE UNITED KINGDOMT. buckles, or : fourth, argent, three piles, gules, over-all in a shieldof pretence, argent, a heart, gules, ensigned with an imperialcrown, or, on a chief, azure, three mullets associated with very first: the thirdand 4th quarters to be transposed. Crest. On a chapeau azure, a salamander vomiting fire. Supporters. In the dexter, a savage, wreathed concerning the loinswith laurel, as well as on the sinister a stag proper, all within a com-partment of stakes impaled. Motto. Jamais Arrieke. Chief Seat, Douglas castle, Lanarkshire. LORD GAGE. 24i)

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GAGE, LORD GAGE. fVISCOUNT GAGE JN IRELAND.; This noble family members is of Norman extraction, and derives its de-scent from^* de Gaga or Gage, which followed William Dukeof Normandy, in his expedition into The united kingdomt, and after the con-quest thereof had been compensated by him with large funds of lands inthe forest of Dean, and county of Gloucester] right beside whichforest, he fixed his residence, by building a seat at Clerenwell,otherwise Clureweli, in the same parish; he in addition built a largehouse in town of Cirencester, where he passed away, and was buriedin that abbey; along with his posterity stayed because county, formany generations, in credit and esteem, one whereof inside reignof Edw. III. had been person in parliament for Tavistock, and anotherfor Basingstoke inside time of Hen. IV. The direct ancestor associated with the present Lord Gage, had been JohnGage, Esq. pointed out in deeds, Q Hen. IV. whose son John married Joan, girl and coheir of John Sudgrove, ofSudgrove in Gloucester, who^ in 1416, 4 Hen, V. gave to JohnG

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Image from page 423 of “The book of photography; useful, theoretical and used” (1905)
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Identifier: bookofphotograph00hasl
Title: The book of photography; practical, theoretical and applied
12 Months: 1905 (1900s)
Writers: Hasluck, Paul N. (Paul Nooncree), 1854-1931 Hands, Arthur
Topics: Photography Photography
Publisher: London, Nyc : Cassell and Co.
Adding Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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a considera-tion of exactly what has been stated with regardto depth of focus will easily show,belongs to another category. Formicroscopic or astronomical work the ob-jects are, almost speaking, in cneplane, or confined toward center of thefield. In ordinary photography, but,objects in numerous airplanes and spreadover a large area have to be all brought :i62 THE GUIDE OF PHOTOGRAPHY. collectively regarding the screen with approxi-mately the exact same amomit of definition.Therefore, a certain give up of criticalsharpness must be made, and a certainamount of understanding known as diffusion of focusintroduced, so that a good averagemay be hit and also the most readily useful effect secured dining table of Depth of Focus. The preceding table, compiled by SirD. Salomon, showing the exact distance at andbeyond which all items have been in focus,with various lenses, will most likely proveof service to individuals who have fixed focushand cameras. The Evolution of Lens. The lens used by Baptista Portafor their digital camera obscura ended up being a plano-

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Fi^. 408.—Pet/.xal Poutk.mt Lens. convex, the convex side being closest theimage. Into the digital cameras employed by Daguerre,Avhich were created by Charles Chevalier,of Paris, the lens had been put the otherway round, its level part facing the focus-sing display screen. This is found to givebetter clearness and meaning, but lesscovering power ; and diaphragms or stopswere introduced to treat this defect.A further enhancement, by Andrew Ross,consisted of altering the jet surfaceof the lens into a concave one, formingthereby a meniscus lens. The sameoptician is given the credit of first solvingthe problem of steer clear of linear dis-tortion, that he accomplished by combiningtwo plano-convex contacts divided by adiaphragm. Thomas Ross, a son ofAndrew Ross, improved about this by thesubstitution of a pair of meniscus specs. Introduction regarding the Petzval Lens. In 1841 J. Petzval, a mathematician ofVienna, designed two goals whichwere built by F. Voigtlander fromdrawings supplied by the designer. Omof

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Image from page 219 of “Heat engineering; a text book of applied thermodynamics for engineers and students in technical schools” (1915)

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Image from page 219 of “Heat engineering; a text book of applied thermodynamics for engineers and students in technical schools” (1915)
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Identifier: heatengineeringt00gree
Title: Heat engineering; a text book of applied thermodynamics for engineers and students in technical schools
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Greene, Arthur Maurice, 1872- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Thermodynamics
Publisher: New York [etc.] McGraw-Hill book company, inc.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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junction at t°C.Later one of the couples in the cylinder was used as the cold THE STEAM ENGINE 205 junction and the drop of temperature between these two wasmeasured. This method was somewhat similar to that used by Prof.E. Hall of Harvard (Trans. A. I. E. E., 1891) but his resultswere not very extensive. To find the temperature of steam the authors used a platinumresistance thermometer in the cylinder 3 in. from the face of thepiston and also one in a small %-in. hole in the center of thepiston head. To get the temperature at a definite point in the stroke byany couple or platinum thermometer a pair of revolving brusheswere attached to the shaft. One brush made contact with acentral copper tube and the other with a sector mounted on acircular disc. The sector was one-thirtieth of a circumferencein length. The disc could be rotated and by a scale and vernierthe position of the crank for any observation could be read. Anumber of sectors on the disc reduced the amount of motion neces-

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42 45 48 51 Fig. 87.—Indicator card marked with points at various sixtieths of a revolu-tion. From 20 X 40 engine. sary. To facilitate the change of circuit to different couples,mercury cups were used. To show the results of these tests, Fig. 88 has been constructedfrom the card, Fig. 87 by finding the saturation temperature forpressures of the steam at points corresponding to definite crankangles. This temperature from the steam tables is plotted tosixtieths of a revolution, giving the curve. The marks X givepoints similar to the results shown by the platinum thermometerwhile the points marked O show the temperatures of the ther-mometer in the steam space in the cylinder head. The curvesillustrating the variation of temperature of the metal at 3^5 in.from the inside surface in the head and that at holes in the sideat 4 in. from end are shown to a larger scale above the card.These curves are ideal and are drawn to indicate the results ofCallendar and Nicolson. 206 HEAT ENGINEERING T

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Image from page 431 of “The American annual of photography” (1914)
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Identifier: americanannualof28newy
Title: The American annual of photography
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Photography
Publisher: New York : Tennant and Ward
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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ia Sensitizing Powder ROYALINE produces sepia prints of Platinum like qualities. Itcan be applied to paper, cards, linen, silk, etc., producing upondevelopment in water rich platinum like sepia prints. It is as sim-ple to use as the Blue Print Process, Each tube makes two ouncesof Sensitizing solution. Try it. You will be delighted with theresults. Price per tube, 25 cents, postpaid EAGLE MORTAR ANDPESTLE GRADUATE This is a four-ounce Graduate, with the bottom espe-cially reinforced, so as to make it act as a mortar. Itis also supplied with a Pestle, one end of which is roundand the other end flat, for breaking up crystals. The bottom of the graduate on the inside is roundedso that no sediment can collect, and so that all crystalscan readily be reached by the pestle and broken up. This is an excellent article and costs very little morethan the ordinary Engraved Graduate. Price, 50 cents, postpaid GEORGE MURPHY, Inc., 57 E. 91hSt., New York Send for new retail mail order cash catalogue

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XXX Practical, Simple, Successful PHOTOGRAPHY in NATURAL COLORS ^^ by the HilcLaje^ Process Duplicating Method Results Certain and Uniform No Unusual Chemicals Employed No Unfamiliar Processes Involved

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Image from page 362 of “Chemical lecture experiments” (1901)
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Identifier: chemicallecturee00bene
Title: Chemical lecture experiments
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Benedict, Francis Gano, 1870-1957
Subjects: Chemistry
Publisher: New York, Macmillan
Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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at the platinum jet insidethe chimney. The escaping gas may be lighted at the topof the chimney and there simultaneously appears a flame ofgas burning in air and a flame of air burning in gas. Itmay be necessary to choke the piece of combustion-tubingby means of a small cork with a slit cut in one side, to pre-vent too large a volume of air from entering the chimneythrough the tube. By properly regulating the supply ofcoal gas and the admission of air, a flame 2 or 3 cm. highis easily obtained. While the two flames do not appear markedly different, itwill be found on thrusting a piece of paper or a visitingcard on the end of a wire through the opening at the top ofthe chimney into the inner flame, that only that portion ofthe card will be burned which is actually in the flame itself.By carefully inserting the card, a picture of the flame maybe obtained by charring the card. Apparatus (Fig. 143); lamp chimney ; corks and tubes ; asbestos or T»Y» aco r»ov» RECIPROCAL COMBUSTION 343

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Fig. 144 4. Combustion of air in hydrogen. — By using an apparatussimilar to that shown in Fig. 143, in which, however, thelarge glass tube in the cork has a U rather than a straightform, the combustion of air in hydrogen may be wellstudied. The apparatus is shown inFig. 144, and consists of a lamp chim-ney provided with a two-holed cork atthe bottom, carrying a small glass elbowand a large U-tube 1 cm. in diameter.Each end of the U-tube should be pro-vided with a platinum tip (Ex. 3). Acork should be inserted in the top ofthe chimney and hydrogen admitted.After all the air is expelled, the hydro-gen escaping from the outer limb of theU-tube is ignited. On removing the corkfrom the top of the chimney, the flame recedes through theU-tube, and soon appears burning at the other end inside thechimney as a flame of air burning in an atmosphere of hydro-gen. On again inserting the cork in the top of the chimney,the hydrogen will escape through the U-tube, and the flamerecede and appear as

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Image from page 82 of “The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection” (1915)

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Image from page 82 of “The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection” (1915)
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Identifier: principlesofmill00brew
Title: The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Brewster, A. Irving
Subjects: Factory inspection Mills and mill-work Sprinklers
Publisher: Richmond Hill, N.Y. : A. Irving Brewster
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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e must belarge enough to supply water, under proper pressure(pounds to the square inch), to all of the automaticsprinklers attached to it, or at least the number that isliable to be opened by the heat or flame of a single fire.Pipe sizes for automatic sprinkler equipments will befound in the standard recommended by the NationalBoard of Fire Underwriters. It will be noticed that agiven number of automatic sprinklers (or heads) is al-lowed on a pipe of a certain diameter. Each size pipeis large enough to feed the number of automatic sprinklersallowed on it, including loss of pressure due to the waterrubbing against the inside surface (friction). The smallestpiping is at the ends of lines (^^laterals^) ; the largestpipes are the main supply pipes. Doubling the diameterof a pipe increases its carrying capacity four times, ap-proximately. Suppose a 2-inch water pipe is used for acertain purpose. The cross section of a 2-inch pipe con-tains 4 square inches, which is found by simply squaring

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SAVED BY SPRINKLERS Automatic sprinklers saved these buildings from theattack of an exposure fire across the street. Woodenwindow frames and sash in the lower building weredestroyed. 78 MILL AND FACTORY INSPECTION the diameter (multiplying the diameter by itself). Apipe of twice the diameter^ that is 4 inches, will have across section of 16 square inches which is four times thenumber of square inches in the cross section of a 2-inchpipe. The opening (orifice) of an automatic sprinkler is%-inch in diameter, or .39 square inches. Only one auto-matic sprinkler is allowed by modern pipe schedules to besupplied by a pipe 1-inch in diameter which is twice thediameter of the orifice of an automatic sprinkler, or .7854square inches. Private Fire Brigades.—Private fire brigades or-ganized among the workmen of a manufacturing plant,department store, shipping terminal, etc., drilled in theuse of private fire appliances, such as hose streams frominterior standpipes, yard hydrants, etc., are inv

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Image from page 78 of “The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection” (1915)
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Identifier: principlesofmill00brew
Title: The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Brewster, A. Irving
Subjects: Factory inspection Mills and mill-work Sprinklers
Publisher: Richmond Hill, N.Y. : A. Irving Brewster
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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e other conspicnons place, to show exactlywhich gate valve is closed. All gate valves are numberedfor quick identification and on this board is a hook forevery gate valve, with the number underneath. The tell-tale tag stays on the proper hook until the closed gatevalve has been opened. Hose Connections.—Small hose is sometimes per-mitted to be connected to automatic sprinkler piping andis handy for both wetting down material inside of build-ings after a fire has been extinguished by automaticsprinklers and for throwing water on fires which cannotbe reached by the nearest automatic sprinklers becauseof obstructions to the distribution of water from the auto-matic sprinklers. Loss of Pressure.—There is a constant loss of pres-sure in water pipes due to friction between the water andthe inside surface of the pipes. This is also true of hose.Bends in pipes, fittings, valves, etc., all tend to reducethe pressure under which water is flowing through them. APPROVED AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS H

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THE NIAGARA, ISSUE B Automatic Sprinkler Company of America,New York City. 74 MILL AND FACTORY INSPECTION These losses of pressure can be considerably reduced bythe use of smooth piping, long bend fittings, minimumnumber of valves, etc. One-Supply Elquipments.—Automatic sprinklerequipments with one water supply are better than none,provided the one water supply is ample and reliable, butthey cannot be considered standard (see Water Supplies,Number of). The exceptions to this rule are automaticsprinkler equipments having a steel pressure tank as awater supply and a connection with a central station for fullsupervisory service (A. D. T. supervisory service). Whenan old building is not strong enough to support a gravityroof tank, and a tank cannot be placed on a trestle builtup from the ground, a good water supply may be obtainedfrom a public street main if of proper size and fed bothways, and the pressure in the street main meets the re-quirements. Partial Equipments.—Automatic spri

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Image from page 1019 of “Factory and industrial management” (1891)

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Identifier: factoryindustria15newy
Title: Factory and industrial management
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Engineering Factory management Industrial efficiency
Publisher: New York [etc.] McGraw-Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Engineering – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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ate of Completion Class Symbol Production Order No. Quantity Description of Work Done Estimate Date Material Value Date Total MaterialAdd j< Labor Hours Total LaborShop Exp. j ® j AKRregate Cost Shkkt SPRAGUK ELECTRIC CO. Value FIG. H. INDIVIDUAL FACTORY COST RECORD.I038 FINDING AND KEEPING SHOP COSTS. 1009 Fig. I shows the Comparative Cost Card, giving successive-costs of same article under the shop name, and indexed alphabetically.Size, 3j^ by 3] J inches. These cards show at a glance whether theflat cost of any factory product is stationary, rising, or falling. Thisrecord is duplicated at the New York offlce and is used for estimrting. Each machine tool and each workman has an individual record inthe accounting room. Figs. K and K i show the front and back of the Individual Ma-chine-Tool record. The front of the card gives particulars of pur-chase and durability ; the back gives particulars of repairs and presentcondition of effectiveness. This card is obviously of the greatest

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FIG. I. COMPARATIVE COST CARD. value in determining subsequent factory equipment purchases. Theback is filled in from the Repair Cards, which are used both forshop repairs and for alterations or improvements in a previously-com-pleted shop production. Figs. L and L i show the front and back of the Repair order.This card issues only from the general manager. Suggestions for repair or betterment are in order from any source—workman or foreman. These cards are thick and thin, in dupli-cate consecutive numbers, the thick one going direct to the account-ing department, and the thin one being held by the foreman whoexecutes the order, until sent to accounting department with the order filled stamp and foremans punch, the total being chargedto the Plant and Betterment Account, credited in part to assets. Rough castings are delivered directly to that part of the machine-shop floor most convenient to the machine tools by which they are tobe finished. There are always exactly enough to fill t

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Image from page 39 of “Biennial report of the Board of State Harbor Commissioners for ..” (1865)
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Identifier: biennialreportof1920cali_0
Title: Biennial report of the Board of State Harbor Commissioners for ..
Year: 1865 (1860s)
Authors: California. Board of State Harbor Commissioners for San Francisco Harbor
Subjects: California. Board of State Harbor Commissioners for San Francisco Harbor Harbors Waterfronts Shipping
Publisher: San Francisco : Winterburn & Co
Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

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921,contracts were awarded for the construction of a combination towing andinspection launch. This boat, the Governor Stephens, is 57 feet in lengthover all, with a beam of 16 feet and a draft of 6 feet. It is equippedwith a 100-horsepower full Diesel engine, which furnishes ample towingpower for the moving of floating equipment. During March and April, 1922, our creosoted pile boom and materialyard were moved from rented land on Hunters point to a site adjacentto Islais Creek and the vegetable oil plant. The arrangement andaccessibility of the new boom and yard have materially increased theefficiency of the department. In addition to the regular miscellaneous maintenance and repairwork on the various structures, the largest repair jobs handled by thedepartment were the repiling of portions of Piers 9, 19, 21 and 25; thereconstruction of the railroad tracks on Piers 7 and 25 and the rebuildingof the dolphin between Ferry Slips 4 and 5. 36 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS.

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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 37 Repairs required on account of damage to the structures by steamships,barges, ferry boats, etc., are constantly being made and billed againstthose causing the damage. Many jobs of construction work are alsodone for the account of our tenants. The revenues from these sources,which should be credited to the department, amounted during the lasttwo years to 0,642.73. 4. BELT RAILROAD. The most important construction work on the Belt Railroad duringthe two fiscal years consisted in the reconstruction of the main line andconnections between Greenwich and Kearny streets. This involved thereplannirg of the entire track layout, the removal of the existing teerail tracks in The Embarcadero and the laying of new main tracks andconnections to the piers, industry tracks and local yards of the WesternPacific and Santa Fe railways. While the changes did not add materiallyto the mileage of the Belt Railroad, the rearrangement will greatly in-crease

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Image from page 1400 of “Hardware merchandising January-March 1916” (1916)

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Identifier: hardmerchjanmar1916toro
Title: Equipment merchandising January-March 1916
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Writers:
Topics: Hardware business Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Adding Collection: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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To assist you Sell much more Paint Every Canada Paint Agent has received ourbig broadside illustrating dealer helps thatwill allow each to offer even more CANADA PAINT Send for people who you will need now—link upyour store, thoroughly not wastefuUy, w^ithour huge Consumer venture and acquire yourshare associated with the profits. To-day could be the day toGet Out to get Under. The Canada Paint business, restricted 572 William Street, Montreal112 Sutherland Avenue, Winnipeg 7/ intereeted, tear-out this site and hold with letters to-be anmoersd. April 8, 1916. EQUIPMENT AND METAL 67 OLrnkheaii^

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100% product sales Increase on Pratt &Lambert Varnishes during 1915 THATS the result of last many years businesson Pratt & Lambert Varnishes in thestore ofW.A.Wilson& Sons, Wheeling,W. Va. Considering which they arecarload purchasers, 100per cent product sales boost meanssomething! The product sales of Vitralite, 61Floor Varnish and 38 Preservative Varnishran way ahead of every other similar productsthat the Wilson folks ever handled. Mr.Wilson credits this result to Pratt & Lambertadvertising, making the varnishes ofreal quality proven to everyone. Then purchase some ready-made salesw^hen you buy varnish? You can do it byhandling Pratt &, Lambert Varnishes. Write for Complete Pratt & LambertDealers Proposition. Pratt & Lambert-Inc. Varnish Makers 67 Years24 Courtwright St., Bridgeburg, Ont. PrdttalambertUdmishpiioposition iQualiiyL Sales iProfits 1 Repeats*** Factories: Bridgeburg, Ontario nyc Buffalo Chicago London Paris Hamburg // curious, tear out these pages and keep with lett

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Image from page 448 of “Journal of electrical energy, power, and gas” (1899)
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Identifier: journalofele241251910paci
Title: Journal of electrical energy, energy, and gasoline
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Writers: Pacific Coast Electric Transmission Association
Subjects: Electrical manufacturing Electricity Gas manufacture and works
Publisher: San Francisco : Specialized Pub. Co.
Adding Library: San Francisco Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

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age Northern Electrical business has the distinc-tion to be a carefully California corporation; thatis, it had been founded and it is owned and run by Cali-fornia passions. The government workplaces have reached san francisco bay area; thepresident is Mr. E. R. Lilienthal; the vice-president,Mr. Louis Sloss, while the secretary, Mr. NormanLogan. The actual operation of the system is under thesupervision associated with basic manager and purchasing broker, Mr. A. D. Schindler, whoever office is within SanFrancisco, and who’s accountable for the admirableresults received. He has got an able assistant in Mr. Mel-ville Dozier, whoever headquarters are in Mulberry. Mr.J. P. Edwards is, as before claimed, the electrical andmechanical professional, and him flow from the credit ofthe design and construction associated with varous electricaland technical features. Most of these men have actually because of the publisher everyassistance feasible in his try to make an accurateand creditable description with this sjstem, of which ailCalifornians may feel happy.

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Five-Car Northern Electrical Train. 392 JOURNAL OF ELECTRICITY, POWER AND GAS [ Vol. XXIV—No. 17 THE WATTHOUR METER. BY WM. M. SHEPARD AND ALLEN G. JONES. CHAPTER VI.MISCELLANEOUS. (Continued.) The Pre-Payment Watthour Meter. The prepayment device as applied to the gasmeter has actually shown its usefiihiess after a numberof several years of service, it becoming particularly important incities where many of consumers are transient resi-dents, also in which those served find it a burdento result in the normal monthly payments, preferring topay as occasion needs. The slow introduction ofprepayment electric yards was partly because thelimited need, because often the course of peoplethat have used electricity for light, power, heat-ing and cooking haven’t been for the type that woulddesire or that could warrant the installation of pre-payment yards. Today electricity occupies these types of overseas industry it might be reported to be used by all classes

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Image from page 147 of “The community capitol; a course for American unity” (1921)
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Identifier: cu31924013104199
Title: The community capitol; a program for American unity
12 Months: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Kelly, Melville Clyde, 1881-
Subjects: Community facilities Farm produce
Publisher: Pittsburgh, The Mayflower hit
Adding Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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f mankind up against the oppression ofplutocracy. It will be the means where all Amer-icans may have equal rights, with unique privi-leges to not one. It makes feasible the effectiverecognition that employees tend to be more valuable than 126 The Community Capitol. workshops, miners mightier than mines, menholier than machines and people higher thanpossessions. It really is a reconciliation, a reaffirma-tion, a restoration and a recovery of the democ-racy where all our institutions tend to be created. The city capitol tends to make real the reli-gion of democracy, the faith of peace onearth, good might to men. The sound regarding the peo-ple, no further throttled and fettered by division,becomes certainly the voice of Jesus. It offers allof united states the right to make of our mistakes, laddersinstead of millstones, even as we workout throughneighborly advice and mutual assist the measures bywhich The united states, torchbearer around the globe, mayfollow that Progress, the onwardstride of Almighty God. Component IIIFood Goods from Farm to Pantry

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O S tJ i! r/j 3 ■A •Q O ^ u ^5 o H 0) tf 01 H n & p 0 [-, o d! ffl Ph m S a o ^ oi ri fcn iR III. FOOD PRODUCTS FROM FARM TOPANTRY. In most American domiciles the highcost of lifestyle is still a tragedy. The prices ofthe necessaries of life being skyrocketeduntil obtained become luxuries to many per-sons. During the Great War it absolutely was consideredpatriotic to just accept the mounting costs of foodwith a smile in addition to remark, Its the war. Itwill be-all correct after ward. But afterwardsis right here. The young men tend to be back but reasonableprices are not. Amidst disorganization of in-dustry and deflation of credit, the customer suf-fers extortion. We speak about cold figures. The numbers ofthe retail price listings of meals products tend to be flaminghot and gleam purple in eyes of each and every man towhom they imply privation and struggling forhimself and people dependent on him. Wage-earners and persons with fixed incomes arecrushed beneath this burden. To them the highcost of living is but another name for reasonable w

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Image taken from page 34 of ‘Funny Books for Boys and Girls. Struwelpeter. Good-for-nothing Boys and Girls. Troublesome Children. King Nutcracker and Poor Reinhold’

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Image taken from page 34 of ‘Funny Books for Boys and Girls. Struwelpeter. Good-for-nothing Boys and Girls. Troublesome Children. King Nutcracker and Poor Reinhold’
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Title: "Funny Books for Boys and Girls. Struwelpeter. Good-for-nothing Boys and Girls. Troublesome Children. King Nutcracker and Poor Reinhold"
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 11648.f.25."
Page: 34
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1856
Publisher: David Bogue
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000412221

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Image from page 239 of “The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment” (1911)
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Identifier: newbookofdogcomp01leig
Title: The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Leighton, Robert, 1859-1934
Subjects: Dogs
Publisher: London New York : Cassell
Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

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h nowadays, eitherat the exhibitions or on the running track ;in fact, a long-coated dog, however good itmight be as regards anatomy, would havea poor chance of winning a prize at a show,for its shaggy appearance would most likelyhide the graceful outline which is a muchadmired and characteristic feature. Of course the handicapper is a most im-portant personage, and it is very creditablethat amongst surroundings where temptationis so profuse, and could be embraced almostwith impunity, men are still at work whohave retained the confidence of the publicfor over thirty years. Such a one is Mr. 202 THE NEW BOOK OF THE DOG. Ralph Harper, of Kearsley, a mining hamletsituated half-way between Manchester andBolton. Probably no man living is sothoroughly acquainted with Whippet racingas he, in fact, it is pretty generally concededthat he has forgotten more about the sportthan most others know. Another trust-worthy handicapper is Mr. Large, of Wolver-hampton, whose bitch Nance is at the present

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MR. J. J. HOLGATES SHIRLEY DIXIEBY SHIRLEY BANNER SHIRLEY DAISY. time playing an important part in big events ;while Mr. Joe Chadwick, of Higginshaw,frequently takes charge of the very largestmeetings with credit to himself and to thesatisfaction of all interested. Reference has been made to the attendantwho releases the dog for a race. He isofficially termed a slipper ; and so muchdepends upon his efforts, that his abilityhas to be taken into account by the handi-capper, as will be seen by the followingrules, which, though somewhat quaintlyworded, can be easily understood, and arestill in force :— Ip_Any slipper not having slipped threewinners in 1905 will be allowed one yard ; orfour winners half a yard, and one yard in thefinal, or second day all through, providing heclaims and names his dog, before the first heat isrun, to the referee ; but must slip the dog allthrough till beaten. 2.—If a slipper claims allowance andthe dog is beaten first time through, he can claimthe same f

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Image from page 209 of “Our search for a wilderness; an account of two ornithological expeditions to Venezuela and to British Guiana” (1910)
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Identifier: oursearchforwild00nile
Title: Our search for a wilderness; an account of two ornithological expeditions to Venezuela and to British Guiana
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Niles, Blair Beebe, William, 1877-1962
Subjects: Natural history Birds
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and company

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on these, the pan was reversed for amoment, and then dipping his finger tips in the clear water ofour glass vial the yellow grains sank swiftly to the bottom.Sometimes only a half pennys worth would reward us, whileagain as much as a shillings value would be shown. Passing over the ridge we saw before us a deep and verynarrow valley with precipitous sides, down which we slid andcrawled, hanging on to vines and saplings to break our de-scent. At the bottom we found an interesting advance in theevolution of gold mining over the simplest form of gold pan-ning. Two blacks were operating a Long Tom, which in i86 OUR SEARCH FOR A WILDERNESS. mining vernacular is the name for a six by two, heavy, coarse,metal sieve set obliquely in the channel of a small brook.The gold-bearing gravel and clay is shovelled into it and pud-dled with a hoe, and the gold settles to the bottom to be laterpanned. Thus division of labor enters in — one blackshovelling while his partner puddles. We asked them how

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 84. Panning Gold. much they were getting out and, as usual, they said almostnothing, or a few shillings worth at the most! This wasto avoid any danger of their tiny holdings being consideredtoo valuable and taken away from them. Mr. Wilshire tooka pan here on another day and unearthed a tiny nugget,worth perhaps two shillings, much to the blacks discom-fiture, who hastened to explain that such an opulent A GOLD MINE IN THE WILDERNESS. 187 find was indeed rare. The poor fellows at best make littleenough and it was pitiful to see the tiny packets of gold dustwhich they-brought to the companys store at the end of theweek to exchange for food or credit checks. The universalGuianan name for this type of independent miner is pork-knocker, the explanation being that by knocking the rocksto pieces, they find just enough gold to procure the pork uponwhich they live. They are allowed to work on side streams near the largemining operations, their total taking of gold being relativelyinsigni

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from web page 18 of “Baltimore and Ohio staff members magazine” (1920).

A couple of wonderful car loan rate images I located:

Picture from web page 18 of “Baltimore as well as Ohio staff members magazine” (1920)
car loan rate
< img alt=" automobile financing price" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14759679815_b4ba3a1f71.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Picture by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14759679815"
> Net Archive Book Images
Identifier
: baltimoreohioemp10balt Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbaltimoreohioemp10balt" > Baltimore and Ohio staff members magazine Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1920" > 1920(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1920" > 1920s) Writers:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorBaltimore_and_Ohio_Railroad_Company" > Baltimore and Ohio Railway Firm< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorBaltimore_and_Ohio_Railroad_Company" > Baltimore and Ohio Railway Company Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectRailroads______Employees______Periodicals" > Railroads– Employees– Periodicals< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectRailroads____United_States____Employees" > Railways– USA– Employees Author:< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_Baltimore___Baltimore_and_Ohio_Railroad_" > [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] Contributing Library:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorUniversity_of_Maryland__College_Park" > University of Maryland, University Park Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorLYRASIS_Members_and_Sloan_Foundation" > LYRASIS Members as well as Sloan Foundation Sight Publication Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/baltimoreohioemp10balt/baltimoreohioemp10balt#page/n18/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Viewer Concerning This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/baltimoreohioemp10balt" rel=" nofollow" > Magazine Entry Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbaltimoreohioemp10balt" > All Pictures From Book Visit this site to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/baltimoreohioemp10balt/baltimoreohioemp10balt#page/n18/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > sight publication online to see this image in context in a browseable online variation of this publication. Text Showing up Before Image: ionsonly vice-president, the others hav-ing come to be Federal officers. At essentialprice hearings in thepast decade before the InterstateCommerce Payment, Mr. Shriverhas stood for not only the Balti-more as well as Ohio Firm, but therailroads typically, in their initiatives todemonstrate the necessity for in-creased prices. Last wintertime when therailroad rate query under the Trans- portration Act was in progression, Mr.Shriver was basic chairman of theAccounting Boards, appearingbefore the Compensation for the ClassI Railroads of the nation as a wholeand for the service providers in the EasternDistrict especially. Mr. Shriverhas likewise appeared prior to the Senateand Home Committees on severaloccasions throughout examinations of therailroad scenario, particiilarly whenthe question of the return of the car-riers to their proprietors was under con-sideration, the examination whichresulted in the Transportation Actof 1920. Some of the Officers of the New Akron Department Cut kindly loaned by the Akron Press Text Showing up After Photo: Readiag frem delegated right, top to bottom: Donald F. Stevens, superintendent; C. P. Angell trainmaster; J. L. Shriver, roadway supervisor ofengines; C. F. Farmerdepartment products representative; E. J. Correll, division engineer; J. A. Tschuor, master technician; M. E. Tuttle, divisionoperator 12 Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, May, ig22 Boosted Forces Now Used on Railroadas Outcome of Better Organisation Bring a lot more furloughed guys hack to their jobs by obtaining much more company, is motto which the Administration has already taken into functional impact THE collection of appreciationmeetings carried out with manyof our chapters of Veterans byH. O. Hartzell, manager CommercialDevelopment, as well as G. W. Astonishment, grand president of the Veterans, dur-ing March and April, was shut witha conference at Philadelphia on April 19. It had been the wish of PresidentWillard that he could express in per-son his admiration to the Veteransand various other employes, that made sucha splendid showing during our busi-ness getting campaign, yet his various other Note About Photos Please note that these photos are extracted from checked page pictures that may have been electronically boosted for readability- pigmentation and also look of these pictures could not perfectly appear like the initial work. Picture from

web page 142 of “The First American Catholic Missionary Congress”( 1908)< img alt= "automobile financing price "src=" https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5580/14765574861_3f66e2760b.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Image by Web Archive Book Images Identifier: firstamericancat00revd Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidfirstamericancat00revd" > The First American Catholic Missionary Congress Year: 1908(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1900" >
1900s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorRev__Diomede_Falconio__et__al_" > Rev. Diomede Falconio, et. al. Topics:. Publisher:. Contributing Library:
< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorGumberg_Library__Duquesne_University" > Gumberg Collection, Duquesne University Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorLYRASIS_Members_and_Sloan_Foundation" > LYRASIS Members and also Sloan Structure View Publication Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/firstamericancat00revd/firstamericancat00revd#page/n142/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Book Visitor About This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/firstamericancat00revd" rel=" nofollow" > Brochure Access SightAll Images: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidfirstamericancat00revd" > All Pictures From Book Go here to< a href =" https://archive.org/stream/firstamericancat00revd/firstamericancat00revd#page/n142/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view publication online to see this image incontext in a browseable online variation of this publication. Text Showing up Before Image: ood in university( praise

); it has motivated theestablishment
of a college as well as seminary for the education and learning ofItalian-Americans for the Italian priesthood of America; ithas over 0,000 now accessible in protections, most of whichrepresents finances, without interest, to poor parishes, whichwould without these be compelled to pay outrageous prices; it hasplaced the chapel-car when traveling to influence more structure, and the bishop that gave it its first examination is right here to tell youwhat it deserves. It has actually developed Canadian Church Exten-sion, which in five months has protected over,000 in cash, has its very own once a week paper, and also is about to build its mission-ary university (praise). It has actually awakened thousands to theneeds of objectives, and also implemented this celebration, un-dreamed of three– two years earlier (applause). In spite of the factthat some thought it could encounter other greats, theSociety for the Propagation of the Confidence is more powerful compared to everin these 3 years; the Indian Bureau has progressed; the 109

Text Showing up After Picture:
IllSi ^ p$ f Hmerlcaii CMDolic missionary Congress ₤ ■

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Picture from page 1599 of “Canadian grocer January-June 1910” (1910)
car loan rate
< img alt=" vehicle funding rate" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14760766536_ee1c12e269.jpg" width=" 400"/ > Picture by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14760766536" > Net Archive Book Images Identifier: cangrocerjanjune1910toro. Title: Canadian grocer January-June 1910 Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1910" > 1910(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1910" > 1910s) Writers:. Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectSupermarkets" > Supermarkets< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectGrocery_trade" > Grocery profession< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectFood_industry_and_trade" > Food industry and profession Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherToronto___Maclean_Hunter_Pub__Co___1887__" > Toronto: Maclean-Hunter Club. Co. [1887] -Contributing Collection:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorFisher___University_of_Toronto" > Fisher- College of Toronto Digitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorUniversity_of_Toronto" > University of Toronto Sight Book Page:< a href=” https://archive.org/stream/cangrocerjanjune1910toro/cangrocerjanjune1910toro#page/n1599/mode/1up” rel=” nofollow” > Book Audience

Regarding This Publication: < a href=" https://archive.org/details/cangrocerjanjune1910toro" rel =" nofollow
” > Directory Access View All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidcangrocerjanjune1910toro" > All Photos From Publication Click right here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/cangrocerjanjune1910toro/cangrocerjanjune1910toro#page/n1599/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > sight book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online variation of this publication. Text Appearing Prior to Image: HAMILTON STORAGE SPACE A lot of Ceiltrally Located. Fire-resistant Warerooms for Merchandise.BONDED OR FREE Separate Rooms for Furniture. Insurance policy Organized at Lowest Rates. LIBERAL LOANS Promptly and Confidentially Advanced on Goods in Shop. GENERAL CARTAGE AGENTS Dispersing from Vehicles a Specialized. THOS. MYLES SONS, LIMITED Key as well as Hu ^ haon Sts., Hamilton. Ont. A SIMPLEX/ Bacon Slicer will certainly conserve you money ^ It cutsperfectly Safe andSimple Compactyet Business-like Roll or side, the Simplex cuts bothclean as a whistle– equal to the high-est-priced equipment on the marketplace. No tough device, nothine togo wrong, a lad can use the Simplexwihout the tiniest danger of mishap. The Simplex does not fill out yourcounter, it is beautifully compaci, verysmart to take a look at, and also very simple to clean-Money happily returned if not asrepresented. J Cost ^ F.O.B. ^ Text Showing up After Picture: We can supply cheaper devices, at and also * 30F. O. B.– good usefulmachines as well as reallypractical. Send out to– E. Morris & Co. Kings Lynn. Eng. Note Concerning

Images Please note that these photosare removed from checked page images that may have been digitally improved for readability- pigmentation as well as look of these pictures could not perfectly

look like the initial job.