Image from web page 58 of “Industries of to-day” (1904)

Some good dismal credit images I found:

Image from page 58 of “Industries of to-day” (1904)
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Identifier: industriesoftoda00lane
Title: Industries of to-day
12 Months: 1904 (1900s)
Writers: Lane, Martha Luther, b. 1862
Subjects: Manufactures Occupations
Publisher: Boston, Ginn & organization
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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eteran picker is shownin the accompanying illustration. [48] A Crop of Cranberries Cranberries are not selected like strawberries,daintily and something by one. Experienced workersplunge your hands under the vines, palms upwardand hands curved, and literally scoop up the fruitby handfuls. A rake, makes it possible for the vines topass through its teeth and maintains the berries, isalso made use of, but is far lesssatisfactory than handlabor. Whenever a measure is filledand emptied the book-keeper standing near givesthe picker credit in hisaccount, though tally issometimes kept by meansof passes, all of whichrepresents a measure and a Veteran can be exchanged within store for tea, sugar,or various other commodities. The most common cost paid isten cents a measure, in addition to laborers, like thosein other occupations, are occasionally discontented. A couple of years ago a strike for higher wagesoccurred on a large marsh where there werefive hundred pickers. Fifty of those, preferringa half-loaf to no breads, held meekly on with their [49]

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Industries of To-Day just work at the old price, and, unfortunate to link, themalcontents, perched easily regarding the dikesas a vantage ground, pelted these with a showerof sticks and rocks. Harmony was finallyrestored and* the strikers returned to get results,but, together old lady among them declared, theylooked thereafter upon the fifty employees as poor-spirited creatures. Definitely, because they work because of the job, there isno potential for cheating, said a visitor to a shrewdproprietor. He looked skeptical. We inform you, he stated, cranberry pickets basically like all the remainder of theworld. Some wouldnt just take a berry to save theirlives, as well as others lie awake nights to imagine howto fill-up their measures. Some will slyly just take a measure and dentin the base, and others have a way of givingthe actions a-shake to be able to toss the berriesup and make five quarts look like six. Humannature is great human on a cranberry bog! Berry selecting has its own champion workers, someof who average over 200 quarts aday, and there

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Image from page 341 of “Fables” (1757)
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Identifier: fables__01gayjuoft
Title: Fables
12 Months: 1757 (1750s)
Writers: Gay, John, 1685-1732
Topics: Fables
Publisher: London C. Hitch
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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lit to his part l>c fitted. Tile Swan, fays he, in hands ihall (LineThe foldicrs marvelous toil be thine.The CiKk lliall mighty wealth attain : get, feek it from the llormy primary. The court ihall function as the Spiders fphertj Pgwr, fortune, ihall reward him there. In -516 PyJ B L E S. In mufics art the Afss fameShall emulate Corellis name. Each took the part that he advisd.And all had been similarly defpisd.A Farmer, at his folly movd.The lifeless preceptor therefore reprovd. Blockhead, fays he, by what youve done.One would have thought em each your fon;For parents, with their offspring blind,Confult nor parts nor change of brain -,But evn in infancy decreeWhat this, exactly what tother fon fliall be.Had judgment weighd the cafe.Their genius therefore had fixd their particular place:The Swan had learnt the failors art;The Cock had playd the foldiers component; The T A-B L E !^. 317 The Spitlcr when you look at the weavers tradeNnil credit had a king’s ransom made ;But tor the luol in evVy clafsThe blockhead had appeard an Afi. ^m>^^ FABLE 38 FABLES.

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{xra^eirtvn FABLE XV. ^he CooK-MAiDj the Turnspit, together with Ox. To a Poor guy.^^Onfider man in evry fphere; Then tell me, is your great deal Icvere ?Tis murmur, difcontent, diftruft,which makes you wretched. Jesus is juft. We grant F yi n r. K .V. we give that appetite miift l)c fcJ,That toil t(X3 earns thy everyday loaves of bread.What after that – thy desires tend to be feen and knownBut evr) mortal feels his own.Were lx)rn a reftlefs needy staff:Show mc the happier guy than you.Adam, thoiii^h blcli above his type,For choose of focial woman pind :Eves wants the fubtle ferpent law;I ler fickle tafte tranfgrcfi.d what the law states:Thu^ Icll our fires; and their particular difgra<.cThe curfc entaild on people. hen Philips fon, by glor) led,Had oer the world their empire fpread;whenever altars to their name were drcli,That he was man his tears confcft. Tlic hopes of avarice tend to be chcckt;The proud guy constantly wants rcf^xrct. Mut 320 FA B L E S. Wliat numerous wishes on powr attend ? Aspiration never ever gains its end. Whom hath not heard the wealthy complain Of fu

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Image from web page 147 of “the road railroad analysis” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev15amer
Title: The street railroad review
12 Months: 1891 (1890s)
Writers: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Topics: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Assessment Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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e, consequently, of die merit and demerit record, as thiscompany keeps it, is always to separate among the list of great males instead thanamong poor people ones, since this is shown by their particular individual recordson which look credit balances of merits. 128 STREET RAILWAY EVALUATION. [Vol. XV, No. 2. Miller Anchors. The accompanying illustration is of the Miller anchor forrailway wrecking functions, and auger for establishing them.These anchors could be emerge from 30 to 40 mins, eight feet deep,and will stand a-strain of 40 to 50 tons. The anchors tend to be madein three sizes. 10×25 in., with i4-n. pole, 9 ft. long; 10×30 in., eluding a number of controlled by the British Electrical Traction Co., Ltd.,and have actually provided really satisfactory outcomes. The sales company of this United states Ventilating Co. reaches 15 CortUlndtSt., new york, plus the officials regarding the organization tend to be: Presi-dent, Anderson Fowler; assistant, Richard B. Kelly, who is vice-president regarding the Fifth National Bank; treasurer and basic man-ager, H. M. Shaw.

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MILLER ANCHOR AND AUGER. with iH-m. pole, 9 ft. lengthy; 10×30 in., with ili-in. pole, 9 ft. long.The anchors are constructed of cast-iron together with rods of wrought iron.The anger features a 9-ft. stem, one-inch in diameter, with an adjustablehandle, once the fury decreases the handle can he moved up thestem. The Miller Anchor Co., Norwalk, O., wliich manufactures thesewrecking anchors, in addition manufactures a line of smaller anchors foranchoring guy cables to phone and trolley poles, with acombination auger with two dull heads when it comes to various sizeanchors. The Miller stone anchor can be something of the companyand can be utilized in just about any sort of rock. These are typically ij4 •■ i diameterand 3^ ft. long, with a J^-in. pole, and can remain a-strain of 15,000lb. The Miller items have actually satisfied with significant amounts of success andare used extensively through the nation by these types of problems asthe Bell phone Co., the Appleyard Syndicate, the Detroit &Toledo Construction Co. in addition to united states of america phone Co

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Photo from web page 43 of “Notice” (1904).

A couple of nice credit history repair work pictures I found:

Photo from page 43 of “Bulletin” (1904)
credit repair
< img alt=" credit fixing" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14761971866_a08baf0f41.jpg" width=" 400"/ > Image by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14761971866"
> Net Archive Publication
Images Identifier: bulletin1915kans Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbulletin1915kans" > Bulletin Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1904" > 1904(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1900" > 1900s) Writers:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorKansas_State_Manual_Training_Normal_School" > Kansas State Guidebook Training Typical School Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectKansas_State_Manual_Training_Normal_School" > Kansas State Manual Educating Normal College< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectState_universities_and_colleges" > State universities as well as colleges< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectTeachers_colleges" > Educators colleges< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectVocational_education" > Employment education and learning Author:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherPittsburg__Kan____State_Manual_Training_Normal_School" > Pittsburg, Kan.: State Manual Training Regular College Adding Collection:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorUniversity_of_Illinois_Urbana_Champaign" > University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorUniversity_of_Illinois_Urbana_Champaign" > University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Web page: Book Viewer Concerning This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/bulletin1915kans” rel=” nofollow” > Directory Access Sight All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbulletin1915kans" > All Photos From Publication Visit this site to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/bulletin1915kans/bulletin1915kans#page/n43/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view publication online to see this picture in context in a browseable online variation of this publication. Text Appearing Prior to Picture: xing metals and melting, pouring, skimming andchipping castings.Ten hours in

store. Two hours outside. Four hours
credit scores. Program 16.– Survey of Industries. A study of some community or city will certainly be made to determine what kindsof job should be taught because community, additionally the earnings paidto staff members, living conditions, chances for improvement, hygienic conditions or objectionable attributes of markets, du-ration of markets in that neighborhood, and so on. Four hrs credit. Program 18.– Farm Auto mechanics. In this age of farming, the thing to be thought about is economic situation of timeand effectiveness, and this training course is particularly made to assist thefarm neighborhood in the treatment and also repair of farm equipment. It in-cludes the making, tempering, etc., of knives, choices, screws, hooks, clevises, swivels, chains, punches, hammers, the honing ofplowshares, farmer teeth, etc. Special lectures are given up thiscourse on the treatment of the equines feet and legs. The treatment and also re- 42 State Handbook Training Typical. Text Appearing After Image: Metalwork Courses. AW set of gas and also fuel engines are additionally included. Prerequisite, programs 2-4. 10
hours store, 2 hours outside. Four hrs credit scores. Course 20.– Sheet and Hammered Steel. Sheet-metal job includes setting out, developing, fascinating, solderingand brazing, as used in such work, relating to the making ofboxes, cyndrical tubes, cornice as well as ell operate in tin, zinc or copper. Pre-requisite, program 14, Illustration Division. 5 hrs in shop, two hours outside. Two hrs credit rating. Hammered metal is developed for using the educator in art anddesign. It consists of the production of bowls, trays, inkstands; precious jewelry operate in copper, brass as well as silver; the lacquering and also etch-ing of metals. All layouts of this work are made in the DesignDepartment. Prerequisite, course 13, Illustration Department. Fivehours in store, 2 hours outside. Two hours credit rating. Note Regarding Pictures Please keep in mind that these photos are removed from scanned page pictures that could have

been electronically improvedfor readability- coloration as well as appearance of these illustrations may not flawlessly look like the original work. Photo from page 460 of” Background of the Army of the Cumberland: its company, campaigns, and fights; created at the demand of Major-General

George H. Thomas primarily from his personal army journal as well as official as well as various other files furnished by him< img alt=" credit history repair" src= "https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14760302136_c2c93b252c.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Photo by< a href= "http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14760302136" > Net Archive Publication Images Identifier: historyofarmyofcvanh Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidhistoryofarmyofcvanh" > History of the Army of the Cumberland
: its company, projects, and fights
; created at the request of Major-General George H. Thomas mainly from his exclusive military journal and official and also various other papers equipped by him Year:< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1875" >
1875(
< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1870" > 1870s)
Authors: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorVan_Horne__Thomas_B___Thomas_Budd___d__1895" > Van Horne, Thomas B. (Thomas Budd), d. 1895 < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorRuger__Edward" > Ruger, Edward Topics:
. Author:
< a href =" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherCincinnati___Robert_Clarke___Co_" > Cincinnati: Robert Clarke & & Co.
. Contributing Library: < a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorLincoln_Financial_Foundation_Collection" > Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Enroller: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorThe_Institute_of_Museum_and_Library_Services_through_an_Indiana_State_Library_LSTA_Grant" > The Institute of Museum and also Collection Providers with an Indiana State Collection LSTA Give

Sight Publication Web page: < a href=" https://archive.org/stream/historyofarmyofcvanh/historyofarmyofcvanh#page/n460/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow"
> Publication Viewer About This Book: < a href =" https://archive.org/details/historyofarmyofcvanh" rel=" nofollow" > Brochure Access View All Images: All Pictures From Publication Click on this link to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/historyofarmyofcvanh/historyofarmyofcvanh#page/n460/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > sight book online to see this picture in context in a browseable online version of this publication. Text Showing up Before Photo: lock-house. An upper story( disappointed in the figure ), resting diagonally onthe edges of the internal square,
was contributed to the west block-house as quarters for the fort. To prevent an excess ofweight, this tale was just made musketry-pro of. On leading ofall was a small hunt. The construction of these block-houses showed terrific credit history after the Michigan Engineers bywhom they were developed. A weapons block-house was alsocommenced in 1865, at Larkinsville, Alabama, but it was nevercompleted. It was meant to answer as a fort for the gar-rison at this vital point, which was much subjected toattack southern side of the Tennessee. It is appropriate toadd that my first concept of constructing a block-house for artillerycame from seeing a discourteous, half-finished work of this kind, which was begun by the Confederates in 1863, at StrawberryPlains, over Knoxville. A weapons block-house is difficult as well as expensive to develop, andis just justifiable in extremely exceptionable localities. I assume APPENDIX. 447 Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 7. Plan of Weapons Block-house. that Bridgeport was sucli an area, as the crucial importanceto

the military of the 2 long bridges over the Tennessee calledfor defense by artillery, also on the island as on the mainland, and the last so completely commanded the island thatartillery might onlv stay on it while thoroughly under cover.It may be well to state that a weapons block-house aftermy layouts was built in 1864, near Alexandria, Virginia, toprotect from cavalry raids down the valley of Hunting creek.The adversary soon located that our block-houses were proofagainst any kind of normal attack, and also small bodies never ever molestedthem. Injury to the track of the railway was repaired almostas quickly as made, and also after a while such annoyances ceased.The only severe assaults received by our block-houses wereas adheres to: 448 APPENDIX. In August, 1864, General Wheeler, with a department ofcavalry, left Atlanta, took a trip north to near Knoxville, thence west to near I ^ ashville, thence southwest Keep in mind Concerning Photos Please note that these images are removed from checked page photos that might have been electronically boosted for readability -coloration and also look of these illustrations could not completely appear like the initial
work.

Image from page 134 of “Astronomy for amateurs” (1904)

Some cool identity thieves images:

Image from page 134 of “Astronomy for amateurs” (1904)
identity thieves
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Identifier: astronomyforamat00flam
Title: Astronomy for amateurs
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Flammarion, Camille, 1842-1925 Welby, Frances A. (Frances Alice) tr
Subjects: Astronomy
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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m-merce, and of thieves. One only sees him furtively,from time to time, at the periods of his greatest elonga-tions, either after the setting or before the rising of theradiant orb, when he presents the aspect of a somewhatreddish star. This planet, like the others, shines only by the re-flection of the Sun whose illumination he receives, andas he is in close juxtaposition with it, his light is brightenough, though his volume is inconsiderable. He issmaller than the Earth. His revolution round the Sunbeing accomplished in about three months, he passesrapidly, in a month and a half, from one side to theother of the orb of day, and is alternately a morningand an evening star. The ancients originally regardedit as two separate planets; but with attentive obser- 114 THE PLANETS vation, they soon perceived its identity. In our some-what foggy cHmates, it can only be discovered once ortwice a year, and then only by looking for it accordingto the indications given in the astronomic almanacs.

Text Appearing After Image:
Co; days Fig. 32.—Orbits of the four Planets nearest to the Sun. Mercury courses round the Sun at a distance of57,000,000 kilometers (35,000,000 miles), and accom-plishes his revolution in 87 days, 23 hours, 15 minutes;t. e., 2 months, 27 days, 23 hours, or a little less thanthree of our months. If the conditions of life are the9 115 ASTRONOMY FOR AMATEURS same there as here, the existence of the Mercuriansmust be four times as short as our own. A youth oftwenty, awaking to the promise of the Hfe he is justbeginning in this world, is an octogenarian in Mercury. xjcars /Neptune

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Image from page 574 of “Popular science monthly” (1872)
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Identifier: popularsciencemo89newyuoft
Title: Popular science monthly
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Science
Publisher: New York : D. Appleton
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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The thieves substitute new hcense platesand a new serial number on the engineto satisfy the suspicious traffic police stop the car, the courteous gentlemenwho are ridinj; in it will present an identi-fication card to corresjiond with the newlicense plates. They p(jint to the serialnumber on the engine. Is it not differ-ent from that of the stolencar? And so, they rideaway safely, unless theofficer is unusuallyastute and per-sistent. Sometimesyour thiefdrives in ,imotor- t r u I- kalongside anc m p t >• auto-mobile, hitchesthe two vehi-cles together,and tows theau t omol) i 1 eaway as if itwere di.sabled.Such obstaclesas chain-locksare inconscciuential tritles. Sharp wire-cutters end the usefulness of all smallchains. Again, if the ignition system of a caris locked, the knights of the road quicklyinstall one of their own temporarily. If

Text Appearing After Image:
the gasoline tank is locked, it is a simphmatter to syphon enough gasoline froma beer jjail into the carburetor for a shortrun into a different locality. One band of enterprising automobilethieves eventuall> captured in Kentuckystole forty-seven Ford cars in New Yorktity within six montlis. They special-ized on doctors cars, becau.se theyrealized that when a doctor paid a callhe usually lelt his car standing unguardedfor a half hour at least, unless heliajipeneil to have a chauffeur or a guest in!iis car, in which case, of course, it wassafe from the thieves. Many manufacturers of high-pricedautomobiles stamp in some inconspicu-ous place identification numbers upon apermanent, immovable steel [)art andthen paint over the nimibers. Whendoubt arises as to the ownership of thecar, the paint is scraped off and theowners identity revealed instantly byconsulting the sales record of themanufacturer or selling agent. A New Gasoline-Motor-DrivenRoad Roller THE old-fashioned steam-roller, wi

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Image from page 184 of “Bird neighbors. an introductory friend with 100 and fifty wild birds frequently based in the gardens, meadows, and woods about our domiciles” (1904)

Various great fix credit images I found:

Image from page 184 of “Bird neighbors. a basic acquaintance with a hundred and fifty birds commonly based in the landscapes, meadows, and forests about our domiciles” (1904)
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Identifier: cu31924090314190
Title: Bird next-door neighbors. An introductory acquaintance with 100 and fifty wild birds generally found in the home gardens, meadows, and forests about our domiciles
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Blanchan, Neltje, 1865-1918
Topics: Birds
Publisher: New York, Grosset & Dunlap
Adding Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ange—North America, from northern Uk provinces to Cen-tral America in wintertime. Migrations—A roving citizen, without fixed periods for migrat-ing. As cedar birds travel about in great flocks that quicklyexhaust their special meals in a neighborhood, they necessarilylead a nomadic life—here to-day, gone to-morrow—and, like theArabs, they silently steal away. It’s surprising how verylittle sound so great a business of those wild birds make at any time.That is mainly because they’re singularly gentle and processed; smooth of.voice, because they are of shade, their plumage recommending an excellent Japan-ese water-color painting on silk, along with its beautiful sheen andexquisitely blended tints. One listens in vain for a song; only a lisping Twee-twee-^e,or a dreary whisper, as Minot calls their low-toned commu-nications with each other, achieves our ears from their high perchesin the cedar trees, in which they sit, very nearly motionless hours at atime, digesting the enormous levels of juniper and whortle 144

Text Appearing After-image:
CEDARBIKD Brown, Olive or grayish-brown, and Brown and Gray Sparrowy Birds berries,, crazy cherries, worms, and pests where they havegormandized. Nuttall provides cedar birds credit for exorbitant politenessto each other. He claims he has often seen all of them passing a wormfrom one to another down an entire row of beaks and straight back againbefore it was finally consumed. Whenever nesting time arrives—that should say, towards the end ofthe summer—they quit their gregarious practices and live-in pairs,billing and kissing like turtle-doves when you look at the orchard or wild crab-trees, where a-flat, bulky nest is pretty carelessly built of twigs,grasses, feathers, strings—any bits and pieces which may be lyingabout. The eggs are usually four, white tinged with purple andspotted with black. Evidently they have no moulting season; their particular plumage isalways the same, beautifully neat and full-feathered. Nothingever hurries or flusters them, their greatest issue apparentlybeing, once they alight, to stay themselves

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