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Image from page 300 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: natureneighborse05bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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he Muskrat, the largest and most valuable member ofthe great family of true rats, inhabits marshes, rivers, andlakes throughout the northern United States and Canada.Even has it come to dwell in isolated ponds in prairie coun-try, doubtless migrating during the wet season. It is pro-tected with a coat of fur which is valuable to the rat and atthe same time valuable to man; especially is this true ofthose varieties living in the North. The pelt is sold undervarious names, perhaps the most pretentious one beingHudson seal. A good fresh pelt brings the boy who securesit anywhere from thirty cents to a dollar, varying upon thecondition and color as well as upon the honesty of thefurrier who fixes the price. The length of a fair-sized animal is about two feet overall. The feet are comparativelj^ small for so large a swim-ming creature, but the flattened tail, which is held in thesame position as that of the fish and used in the same way,makes up whatever of motive power is lost through the

Text Appearing After Image:
A GROUP OF RODENTS 133 smallness of the feet. It makes its home sometimes inburrows in the banks and sometimes far out in the pond ormarsh, using for the purpose strong reeds or small sticksand mud. In every case the mouth of the burrow is belowwater and is entered by diving; thus it is protected verywell from the weasel, ferret, and mink. The food materialis sweet flag, lily bulbs, and roots, and fresh-water clams,and even fish. H. B. Shinn. CHAPTER VII NOTED CARNIVOROUS ANIMALS The carnivorous animals are so called because their dietconsists almost exclusively of flesh. It is not often the casethat the animal preyed upon stands quietly about awaitingcapture; the captor is compelled to exercise every meansat his disposal to get his dinner. The carnivora are, as arule, then, of active, alert, and even ferocious disposition,endowed with great strength, of great craft, and fitted invarious other ways to pursue the pre} wherever it may go.Thus they are able to chmb trees, to capture the

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Image from page 1093 of “The Ladies’ home journal” (1889)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ home journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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e is a comprehensive humanability. It is not physical like weight liftingor high jumping; it is not sensory like hear-ing or seeing or smelling. Intelligence is theability to carry on thinking by the use ofsymbols; it demands a form of language suchas words or numbers. Intelligence is a read-iness to learn, to comprehend, and is differentfrom wisdom, which is acquired slowly andoften painfully over decades. Intelligencedoes not grow indefinitely; it tends to reacha peak in the early twenties, while all of uscan throughout a long life span add endlesslyto our knowledge and experience. Some children are so lacking in intelli-gence as to be designated feeble-minded.Slowly we are learning through a broaderknowledge of man, however, that there arefewer truly feeble-minded children than wepreviously thought. ,Some children havebeen classified as dumb—and then haveturned out to be defective of speech or hard DIAPERSDONTSOIL! when you use Chix COTTONED DIAPER LINERS DISPOSABLE • ABSORBENT

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CHICOPEE SALES CORP., NEW YORK 13, N. V^P.6a6ySrtf& nj from SP-l-M-5 ^fK BABEE-TENDA STURDY FOLDING SAFETY CHAIR) Tuck your young squirmer in thisJlow, tumbleproof chair for feeding oilplay. Patented safety features. Folds jfor easy carrying or storage. Converts |to many-use junior table. Grancbaby-gift. Doctor-approved. SEND FOR FREE FOLDER Nof sold in stores. See l Good Housekeeping / phone book for authorized agency or write today for helpful illustrated folder. THE BABEE-TENDA CORFDept. 5E, 750 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland 15, Ohi YIPPEE AY . . YIPPEE fat Afcca-K*tU& f*0Df0£?

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Image from page 136 of “North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]” (1894)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: northcarolinachr49unit
Title: North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference
Subjects: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Greensboro, N.C., Methodist Board of Publication, [etc.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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TER: READ MY FREE OFFER

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Wise Words to Sufferers From a Woman of Notre Dame, I will mail, free of any charge, this Home Treat-ment with full instructions and the history of myown case to any lady suffering from female troubi eYou can cure yourself at home without the aid ofany physician. It will cost you nothing to give thetreatment a trial, and if you decide to continue itwillonly cost you about twelve cents a week. Itwill not interfere with your work or occupation.I have nothing to sell. Tell other sufferers of it—thatls all I ask. It cures all, young or old. J^S1 If you feel a bearing-down sensation, sense ofimpending evil, pain in the back or bowels, creeping feeling up the spine, a desire to cry frequently,hot flashes, weariness, frequent desire to urinate,or if you have Leueorrbea (Whites), Displacementor Falling of tne Womb, Profuse, Scanty or PainfulPeriods, Tumors or Growths, address MRS. RI.SUMMERS, NOTRE DAME, IND., U. S. A. forthe Free Treatment and Fttll Information.Thousands besides myself hav

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.