Image from page 178 of “India on the march” (1922)

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Image from page 178 of “India on the march” (1922)
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Identifier: indiaonthemarch00clar
Title: India on the march
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Clark, Alden Hyde, 1878- Missionary Education Movement of the United States and Canada
Subjects: Missions
Publisher: New York : Missionary education movement of the United States and Canada
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

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here are sixty mil-lion who do not get enough to eat except during theharvest time. Is it part of the missionarys job totry to help them earn a better living ? The missionaryanswers emphatically, Yes! Jesus fed the hungry,and we would not be true disciples of our Master ifwe did not try to help men and women and little chil-dren to get enough to eat and enough to wear. Ourvillage schools with their 500,000 pupils help. It is notso easy for the money sharks of India, who alwaysprey upon the poor, to get into their clutches menwho can read and figure. Moreover, thousands of boysand girls from dark, one-room, poverty-stricken homeshave gone through the village school into higher educa-tion and are now earning fair incomes as doctors, nurses,clerks, teachers, or workers in other useful callings. Another way in which the missionaries try to helpis through Cooperative Credit Societies. Have youever heard of a missionary banker? Come to Jalna,and I will show you one who has been decorated by

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Dr. Anna S. Kugler working; with her clerk at the GunturHospital which, under hsr leadership, developed in fifteen yearsfrom a medicine chest to one of tlie largest and finest missionhospitals in South India, with maternity block, chapel, nurseshome, and dispensary. THOSE POOB MISSIONARIES 149 the Government for his services. Rev. W. E. Wilkie-Brown is another typical missionary, a kindly, vigor-ous Scotchman. He found many of the villagers ofthe Jalna district practically the slaves of the moneylender. They had to have money for seed every rainyseason, and they had no money to huy it with, so thatthey had to horrow from the money lender, who waswilling to accommodate them for a little matter ofsixty or eighty per cent a year. Once in the hands ofthe money lender, the poor man never gets out. Hetoils on, and his wife and children toil on. They keeppaying of their little earnings on their deht, but it doesnot grow less. A wedding comes, or sickness, andmore deht and more interest are a

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Image from page 126 of “The art treasures of Washington : an account of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and of the National Gallery and Museum, with descriptions and criticisms of their contents; including, also, an account of the works of art in the Capitol,
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Identifier: arttreasuresofwa00hend
Title: The art treasures of Washington : an account of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and of the National Gallery and Museum, with descriptions and criticisms of their contents; including, also, an account of the works of art in the Capitol, and in the Library of Congress, and of the most important statuary in the city
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Henderson, Helen Weston, 1874-
Subjects: Art museums Art Art
Publisher: Boston : L. C. Page & Company
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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. His Landscape:View from Mount Mansfield/ was received in1. and is considered a masterpiece. Wyant was born in a small town in Ohio, wherehe was subject to the usual artistic privations untilat the age of twenty years he removed to Cincin-nati, where, it IS to be supposed, he first came into contact with artistic productions worthy the name. Though [nness was at this time a comparatively urc painter, Wyant sensed his importance, and feeling within himself something responsive to the greater painters article- of Faith, made the trip to Perth Ambpy, where [lUieSfl then lived, and SOUght his advice and aid. As a painter, Wyant had not the powerful exe-cution nor the varied repertoire of his distinguishedprototype. Glimpses of sunny, rolling country,seen between -lender wood grown trees, form the theme upon which he develops many variations.The Corcoran Gallerys example IS purest pa>toral.With [nness, Wyant, and Homer Martin (the lat-ter not represented in the Gallery J comes the cul-

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zk Cbafn of Hmerican painters 96 miration of the early American school of land-scape painting. In |. Francis Murphy (1853 )we trace a less intelligent leaning upon the methodsof [nness. His October, painted in [888-1893,reflects the subject, style, and mannerisms of the older painter to a marked degree. It came to the Gallery from the Thomas B. Garke sale in 1S00. William Lamb Picknell (1852-1897), who isrepresented in the Gallery by two large landscapes,studied for two years with [nness in Rome, andafterward with Gerome, in Paris. He lived andpainted in Brittany, working under Robert Wylieuntil the death of that artist. The Road to Con-carneau, eonsidered the painters masterpiece, waspainted in 1880, and purchased by the Gallery fromthe Thomas B. Clarke sale, in 1889. The pictureIS clear and brilliant, more like the atmospheric ef-fect of Arizona, in the sharpness of its detail andthe intense blue of the sky, than like France.PicknelTs style was realistic and his method ofpainting d

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Image from page 298 of “The California fruits and how to grow them” (1889)
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Identifier: californiafruits00wick
Title: The California fruits and how to grow them
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wickson, Edward James, 1848- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Fruit-culture
Publisher: San Francisco, Cal., Dewey & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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sh dark and veryjuicy, with a fine flavor.—^John Bidwell. Reported thus far a shy bearer, by JamesShinn, Alameda County. DUKES and MORELLOS. Early Richmond (Kentish).—An early, red, acid cherry; valuable for cookingearly in the season. May Duke.—An old, well-known, excellent variety; large; dark red; juicy,sub-acid, rich. Arch Duke.—Fruit large, obtuse, heart-shaped; bright red becoming dark;flesh light red, melting, juicy, rich, sub-acid flavor; very good. Tree more uprightand vigorous than May Duke. Late Duke.—PVuit large, flattened or obtuse, heart-shaped; white, mottledwith red, becoming rich, dark red when ripe; flesh yellowish, tender, juicy; hangs longon the tree. Dukes and JMorellos. 281 Reine Hortense. — It is one of the very largest of cherries; a Ijeautifiil, glossyred, or deep pink, when fully ripe; heart-shaped; a universal bearer, and whenhanging on the tree, no fruit is more beautiful; excellent for canning, but too soft andjuicy for shipment.—W. W, Smith.

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The Centennial Cherry—A California Seedling. English Morello.—Large; dark red, nearly black; tender, juicy, rich, acid,productive and late. GuiGNE NoiR LuiSANTE (Black Spanish).—Fruit medium size, round, heart-shaped, glossy, blackish red; flesh reddish purple, tender, juicy, rich, acid. Belle Magnifique.—Fruit large, roundish, inclined to heart-3hape; skin a fine,bright red; flesh juicy, lender, with sprightly sub-acid flavor; one of the best of itsclass; a fine table fruit when fully ripe; very late. PACIFIC COAST SEEDLINGS. Black Republican (Lewelling, Black Oregon).—Seedling by Seth Lewelling,Milwaukee, Oregon, from seed planted in i860; first fruited in orchard in 1864. 282 Cherries of Local Origin. Widely distrilnited in California. Large, black, sweet, with purple flesh; ripens tendays after Black Tartarian.—James Shinn. Large, late black cherry, good flavor,long keeper; dries and ships well. Seems to succeed better on foot-hills than in thevalley.—Robert Williams

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