Image from page 256 of “Collins’s peerage of The united kingdomt; genealogical, biographical, and historic” (1812)

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Image from web page 256 of “Collins’s peerage of The united kingdomt; genealogical, biographical, and historical” (1812)
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Identifier: collinsspeerageo_08coll
Title: Collins’s peerage of The united kingdomt; genealogical, biographical, and historical
12 Months: 1812 (1810s)
Writers: Collins, Arthur, 1682?-1760 Brydges, Egerton, Sir, 1762-1837
Subjects: Nobility
Publisher: London, Printed for F.C. and J. Rivington, Otridge and Son [etc.]
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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, one of thesenators of college of justice, and contains a son, John Stewart. Which Sir George Stewart, today of Grandtully, Bart, is married withDame Agnes Cockburn, child of Sir Archibald Cockburn, of Langton,Bart. NiiLets Hernldry,ut suj>ra. Colonel John Stewart, the second boy right here pointed out, which afterwardssucceeded toward Baronetage, hitched, secondly. Lady Jane Douglas, above-mentioned, and ended up being parent by the woman for the present Lord Douclas. 248 PEERAGE OF THE UNITED KINGDOMT. buckles, or : fourth, argent, three piles, gules, over-all in a shieldof pretence, argent, a heart, gules, ensigned with an imperialcrown, or, on a chief, azure, three mullets associated with very first: the thirdand 4th quarters to be transposed. Crest. On a chapeau azure, a salamander vomiting fire. Supporters. In the dexter, a savage, wreathed concerning the loinswith laurel, as well as on the sinister a stag proper, all within a com-partment of stakes impaled. Motto. Jamais Arrieke. Chief Seat, Douglas castle, Lanarkshire. LORD GAGE. 24i)

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GAGE, LORD GAGE. fVISCOUNT GAGE JN IRELAND.; This noble family members is of Norman extraction, and derives its de-scent from^* de Gaga or Gage, which followed William Dukeof Normandy, in his expedition into The united kingdomt, and after the con-quest thereof had been compensated by him with large funds of lands inthe forest of Dean, and county of Gloucester] right beside whichforest, he fixed his residence, by building a seat at Clerenwell,otherwise Clureweli, in the same parish; he in addition built a largehouse in town of Cirencester, where he passed away, and was buriedin that abbey; along with his posterity stayed because county, formany generations, in credit and esteem, one whereof inside reignof Edw. III. had been person in parliament for Tavistock, and anotherfor Basingstoke inside time of Hen. IV. The direct ancestor associated with the present Lord Gage, had been JohnGage, Esq. pointed out in deeds, Q Hen. IV. whose son John married Joan, girl and coheir of John Sudgrove, ofSudgrove in Gloucester, who^ in 1416, 4 Hen, V. gave to JohnG

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Image from page 423 of “The book of photography; useful, theoretical and used” (1905)
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Identifier: bookofphotograph00hasl
Title: The book of photography; practical, theoretical and applied
12 Months: 1905 (1900s)
Writers: Hasluck, Paul N. (Paul Nooncree), 1854-1931 Hands, Arthur
Topics: Photography Photography
Publisher: London, Nyc : Cassell and Co.
Adding Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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a considera-tion of exactly what has been stated with regardto depth of focus will easily show,belongs to another category. Formicroscopic or astronomical work the ob-jects are, almost speaking, in cneplane, or confined toward center of thefield. In ordinary photography, but,objects in numerous airplanes and spreadover a large area have to be all brought :i62 THE GUIDE OF PHOTOGRAPHY. collectively regarding the screen with approxi-mately the exact same amomit of definition.Therefore, a certain give up of criticalsharpness must be made, and a certainamount of understanding known as diffusion of focusintroduced, so that a good averagemay be hit and also the most readily useful effect secured dining table of Depth of Focus. The preceding table, compiled by SirD. Salomon, showing the exact distance at andbeyond which all items have been in focus,with various lenses, will most likely proveof service to individuals who have fixed focushand cameras. The Evolution of Lens. The lens used by Baptista Portafor their digital camera obscura ended up being a plano-

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Fi^. 408.—Pet/.xal Poutk.mt Lens. convex, the convex side being closest theimage. Into the digital cameras employed by Daguerre,Avhich were created by Charles Chevalier,of Paris, the lens had been put the otherway round, its level part facing the focus-sing display screen. This is found to givebetter clearness and meaning, but lesscovering power ; and diaphragms or stopswere introduced to treat this defect.A further enhancement, by Andrew Ross,consisted of altering the jet surfaceof the lens into a concave one, formingthereby a meniscus lens. The sameoptician is given the credit of first solvingthe problem of steer clear of linear dis-tortion, that he accomplished by combiningtwo plano-convex contacts divided by adiaphragm. Thomas Ross, a son ofAndrew Ross, improved about this by thesubstitution of a pair of meniscus specs. Introduction regarding the Petzval Lens. In 1841 J. Petzval, a mathematician ofVienna, designed two goals whichwere built by F. Voigtlander fromdrawings supplied by the designer. Omof

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Image from page 26 of “Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium fishes; a complete guide to aquaria and related subjects” (1917)

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Image from page 26 of “Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium fishes; a complete guide to aquaria and related subjects” (1917)
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Identifier: goldfishvarietie00inne
Title: Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium fishes; a complete guide to aquaria and related subjects
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Innes, William T. (William Thornton), 1874-1969
Subjects: Aquariums Goldfish
Publisher: Philadelphia, Innes
Contributing Library: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

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Fii.. 7. Prizewixnixg Scai.ei.kss Tklkscoi-k (jdi.ih ism(Reduced onc-quartcrl Tliis fish won the Diploma of Honor in 1907 as tlie l)cst fisli (anyclass) owned. Altliougii no special attention was paid to l)roadtails atthis time, there were quite a numher of them, tliis l)eing a good specimen.

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Fjg. 8. Prizewinning Veiltail Moor (Reduced one-third) This is considered to be one of the finest black goldfishes ever bred. The short,deep body, the sail-like dorsal fin, the large, clear eyes, the broad flowing tails, thevelvety black color combined with good lines and style make this remarkable fish apattern which we might hope to equal but hardly to surpass. Chapter Two Goldfish Varieties 20 GOLDFISH VARIETIES A^D THE GOLDFISH There are two root-stocks from which the goldfishes of to-day haveoriginated. Both are members of the carp family. The European gold-fish, Carassius carassius, has never been developed into any of the fancyforms except by crossing with cultivated types of the Asiatic stock, Ca-rassius anratus. The Orientals, principally those of Korea, China andJapan must be given credit for first establishing, by selective breeding,the goldfish as an ornamental pet as well as for the incredible lengths towhich they have gone in fixing fancy breeds. Of this more will be sai

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Image from page 222 of “Apes and monkeys; their life and language” (1900)
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Identifier: apesmonkeystheir00garn
Title: Apes and monkeys; their life and language
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Garner, Richard Lynch, 1848-1920
Subjects: Monkeys Speech Sound production by animals
Publisher: Boston and London, Ginn & company
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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sfingers in this crack and try to open the door. He hasnot been able to unlock it when the key is given him,although he knows the use of the key and has often triedit; but his keeper has never imparted the secret to him,and his method of using the key has been to prise with it orpull it, instead of turning it after putting it in the keyhole. The young keeper, Mr. Webb, deserves great credit forhis untiring attention to this valuable young ape, and theresults of his zeal are worthy of the recognition of everyman who is interested in the study of animals. Another specimen that may be regarded as an inter-mediate type was recently kept in Bellevue Gardens atManchester. He was playful and full of mischief. Hehad been taught to use a stick or broom in fight, and withsuch a weapon in his hand he would run all over the build-ing, hunting some one to attack. He did not appear to beserious in his assault, but treated it as fun. It is a badthing to teach to apes, because they grow pugnacious as

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MR. CROWLEY, LATE OF THE NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN(Taken from Life.) 200 APES AND MONKEYS they grow older, and all animals kept closely confinedacquire a bad temper. In an adjoining cage was kept a young orang, and thetwo ate at the same table. The chimpanzee appeared toentertain a species of contempt for the orang. The keeperhad taught him to pass the bread to. his neighbor, but heobeyed with such reluctance that his manner betrayedmore disgust than kindness. A few small pieces of breadwere placed on a tin plate, and the kulu was required tolift the plate in his hand and offer it to the orang beforehe himself was allowed to eat. He would lift the plate afew inches above the table and hold it before the orangsface ; when the latter had taken a piece of the bread, thechimpanzee withdrew the plate, held it for a moment, anddropped it. Meanwhile he kept his eyes fixed on theorang. The manner in which he dropped the plate lookedas if he did so in contempt. When the meal was finished,the

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Image from page 184 of “Bird neighbors. an introductory friend with 100 and fifty wild birds frequently based in the gardens, meadows, and woods about our domiciles” (1904)

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Image from page 184 of “Bird neighbors. a basic acquaintance with a hundred and fifty birds commonly based in the landscapes, meadows, and forests about our domiciles” (1904)
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Identifier: cu31924090314190
Title: Bird next-door neighbors. An introductory acquaintance with 100 and fifty wild birds generally found in the home gardens, meadows, and forests about our domiciles
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Blanchan, Neltje, 1865-1918
Topics: Birds
Publisher: New York, Grosset & Dunlap
Adding Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ange—North America, from northern Uk provinces to Cen-tral America in wintertime. Migrations—A roving citizen, without fixed periods for migrat-ing. As cedar birds travel about in great flocks that quicklyexhaust their special meals in a neighborhood, they necessarilylead a nomadic life—here to-day, gone to-morrow—and, like theArabs, they silently steal away. It’s surprising how verylittle sound so great a business of those wild birds make at any time.That is mainly because they’re singularly gentle and processed; smooth of.voice, because they are of shade, their plumage recommending an excellent Japan-ese water-color painting on silk, along with its beautiful sheen andexquisitely blended tints. One listens in vain for a song; only a lisping Twee-twee-^e,or a dreary whisper, as Minot calls their low-toned commu-nications with each other, achieves our ears from their high perchesin the cedar trees, in which they sit, very nearly motionless hours at atime, digesting the enormous levels of juniper and whortle 144

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CEDARBIKD Brown, Olive or grayish-brown, and Brown and Gray Sparrowy Birds berries,, crazy cherries, worms, and pests where they havegormandized. Nuttall provides cedar birds credit for exorbitant politenessto each other. He claims he has often seen all of them passing a wormfrom one to another down an entire row of beaks and straight back againbefore it was finally consumed. Whenever nesting time arrives—that should say, towards the end ofthe summer—they quit their gregarious practices and live-in pairs,billing and kissing like turtle-doves when you look at the orchard or wild crab-trees, where a-flat, bulky nest is pretty carelessly built of twigs,grasses, feathers, strings—any bits and pieces which may be lyingabout. The eggs are usually four, white tinged with purple andspotted with black. Evidently they have no moulting season; their particular plumage isalways the same, beautifully neat and full-feathered. Nothingever hurries or flusters them, their greatest issue apparentlybeing, once they alight, to stay themselves

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