Image from page 223 of “The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society” (1898)

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Image from page 223 of “The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society” (1898)
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Identifier: journalofamerica00amer
Title: The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: American-Irish Historical Society
Subjects: American-Irish Historical Society Irish Americans Ethnology
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : The Society
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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nd ProfessorRogers was chosen President. Associated with him during allits struggles for organization, were many of Massachusetts mosteminent scientists and educators. In 1864, Professor Rogers, in writing to his brother, mentionsthe admirable lectures of Henry Giles, the noted Irish-Americanlecturer and essayist, delivered in Boston. Professor Rogers, never very strong, was obliged to take oceantrips, and was much sought by foreign colleges for addresses onscientific subjects. His correspondence with James RussellLowell and Eliot, later President of Harvard, shows the esteemin which he was held by these gentlemen. On June 1st, 1870, he resigned as President of the Institute onaccount of ill health; and, while addressing the graduation classof the Institute in 1882, suddenly dropped, and was dead in ashort time. Few men in any walk of life had more glowing and gracefultributes paid them by men of eminence and prominence, thanWilliam B. Rogers, the son of an Irish emigrant and patriot.

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JOHN DOYLE. Reproduction by Anna Frances Levins LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. 197 William B. Rogers and his brothers lived splendid and usefullives, and no better monument could be placed to the credit ofany man than the internationally known Massachusetts Instituteof Technology. LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. The following letter was written by the father of the lateJohn T. Doyle of Menlo Park, California, upon his arrival in theUnited States an emigrant from Ireland. The original letter wasgiven by Miss Doyle, a granddaughter of John Doyle, to RichardC. OConnor, Esq., of San Francisco, Vice-President-General ofthis Society. In sending to the Journal a copy of the San Fran-cisco Monitor of February 8th, 1913, in which the letter waspublished, Mr OConnor writes: John Doyle was a native of Kilkenny, Ireland. He was theson of Edmond Doyle, who had joined the United Irishmen in1798, whose home was wrecked, and whose family was scatteredamong various relatives. John Doyle leaves many descendantsand relati

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Image from page 188 of “New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions” (1889)
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Identifier: bedfordmassac00newb
Title: New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.). Board of Trade Pease, Zeph. W. (Zephaniah Walter), b. 1861 Hough, George A Sayer, William L. (William Lawton), 1848-1914
Subjects:
Publisher: [New Bedford] Mercury publishing company, printers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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;^ high, with a monitor roof, and four hundred by one hundredfifty feet in area, while the picker and dye house is two hundred thirtyby fifty-two feet in area. The mill is provided with five thousand spindles, sixty-threebroad looms ninety-five and one hundred ten inches in width, andtwelve sets of cards. The machinery is operated by a two hundredfifty-two horse power Harris-Corliss engine, with three six-foot boilers,made by Cunningham, of Boston. Between seven hundred thousand and eight hundred thousandpounds of wool are worked annualh, and the cloth is made here andcolored in the wool and piece. The annual product is about eighthundred thousand yards of cloth, and one hundred sixty-five handsare employed. The officers of the corporation are as follows ; President — Loum Snow, Jr. Treasurer—Robert Snow. Directors — Edward D. Mandell, Charles W. Plummer, FrederickS. Allen, Charles W. Clifford. George S. Homer, Thomas H. Knowles,and Loum Snow, Jr. •t/-vy V ■i;fZ

Text Appearing After Image:
INDUSTRIAL AND FINANCIAL. 173 THE MANUFACTURE OF OIL. To mention New Bedford without devoting some space to her oilmanufactories would be to neglect the genius of the lamp, and toomuch credit cannot be given this industry for the present position ofthis city. William A. Walls interesting picture of The Origin of the Whale-tishery, which now hangs in the parlors of the home of the late Mrs.Charles W. Morgan, contains an illustration of the first oil factory inNew Bedford. It consisted merely of a trypot under an old shed bythe shore. Near by stands a man pouring oil from a long handleddipper into a wooden-hooped barrel. Another is handling over theblubber, while a third is coopering a barrel. The latter is engagedin conversation with an Indian who is seated upon a broken mast.On the shore, keeled over on her side, is one of the small sloopsemplo3ed in whaling at that time, and the river lies outstretched inthe background. Seated upon the frame of a grindstone, and giving directions toa

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Photo from page 184 of “New Bedford, Massachusetts; its background, sectors, institutions and also tourist attractions” (1889)
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< img alt=" credit scores tracking" src=" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/14797545953_963242902f.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Picture by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14797545953"
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: newbedfordmassac00newb Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidnewbedfordmassac00newb" > New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, sectors, organizations and destinations Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1889" > 1889 (< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1880" > 1880s) Authors:< a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorNew_Bedford_Board_of_Trade" > New Bedford Board of Profession Pease, Zeph. W.( Zephaniah Walter) , b. 1861< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorHough__George_A" > Hough, George A< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorSayer__William_L___William_Lawton___1848_1914" > Sayer, William L.( William Lawton), 1848-1914 Topics:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectNew_Bedford__Mass__" > New Bedford( Mass.) Author:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_New_Bedford__Mercury_publishing_company__printers" > [New Bedford] Mercury publishing company, printers Contributing Collection:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorNew_York_Public_Library" >
New york city Town libraryDigitizing Enroller:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorMSN" > MSN Sight Book Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/newbedfordmassac00newb/newbedfordmassac00newb#page/n184/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow ” > Book Viewer About This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/newbedfordmassac00newb" rel=" nofollow" > Directory Entrance ViewAll Images:
< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidnewbedfordmassac00newb" > All Pictures From Book Click on this link to< a href =" https://archive.org/stream/newbedfordmassac00newb/newbedfordmassac00newb#page/n184/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view book online to see this image incontext in a browseable online version of this publication. Text Appearing Before Picture:, with a screen roofing system, and also

4 hundred by one hundredfifty feet in area, while the picker and color residence is 2 hundred thirtyby fifty-two feet in area. The mill is provided with 5 thousand spindles, sixty-threebroad looms ninety-five and also one hundred ten inches in width, andtwelve sets of cards. The equipment is run by a two hundredfifty-two horse power Harris-Corliss engine, with 3 six-foot boilers, made by Cunningham, of Boston. Between 7 hundred thousand as well as 8 hundred thousandpounds of woollen are functioned annuall3s as well as the fabric is made here andcolored in the wool and piece. The annual product is about eighthundred thousand lawns of cloth, and also one hundred sixty-five handsare used. The policemans of the company are as follows: – Head of state– Loum Snow, Jr. Treasurer– Robert Snow. Supervisors– Edward D. Mandell, Charles W. Plummer, FrederickS. Allen, Charles W. Cliflxjrd. George S. Homer, Thomas H. Knowles, and Loum Snow, Jr.:3 j m o mzo mO C/5 om O Text Appearing After Photo: INDUSTRIAL As Well As FINANCIAL
. 173 THE MANUFACTURE OF OIL. To
mention New Bedford without devoting some area to her oilmanufactories would be to forget the brilliant of the light, as well as toomuch credit report can not be provided this sector for the here and now position ofthis city. William A. Walls intriguing image of The Origin of the Whale-fishery, which now awaits the shops of the residence of the late Mrs.Charles W. Morgan, includes an illustration of the-first oil manufacturing facility inNew Bedford. It consisted simply of a trypot under an old shed bythe coast. Near by stands a male putting oil from a long handleddipper right into a wooden-hooped barrel. Another is handling over theblubber, while a 3rd is coopering a barrel. The last is engagedin conversation with an Indian who is sittinged after a busted mast.On the shore, dropped on her side, is just one of the small sloopsemployed in whaling at that time, and also the river lies outstretched inthe background. Seatsed upon the frame of a grindstone, and also offering directions toa Note Concerning Photos Please note that these pictures are drawn out from scanned page photos that might have been digitally
improved for readability– pigmentation as well as look of these illustrations might not flawlessly look like the original work. Picture from web page 240 of “Leslie’s history of the better New york city”( 1898 )< img alt =" credit report surveillance "src =" https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2932/14587462159_367f582e79.jpg" size= "400"/ > Picture by< a href =" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14587462159" > Internet Archive Book Images Identifier: leslieshistoryof02vanpa Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidleslieshistoryof02vanpa" >
Leslie’s history of the better New YorkYear:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1898" > 1898(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1890" > 1890s) Writers:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorVan_Pelt__Daniel__1853_1900" > Van Pelt, Daniel, 1853-1900 Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectNew_York__N_Y______History" > New york city( N.Y.)– Background< a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectNew_York__N_Y______Biography" > New York( N.Y.)– Biography Publisher:< a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherNew_York__U_S_A____Arkell_Pub__Co_" > New york city, U.S.A.: Arkell Club. Co. Adding Library:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorThe_Library_of_Congress "> The Library of Congress DigitizingSponsor:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorSloan_Foundation" > Sloan Foundation Sight Book

Page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/leslieshistoryof02vanpa/leslieshistoryof02vanpa#page/n240/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" >

Book Audience Concerning This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/leslieshistoryof02vanpa" rel=" nofollow" > Catalog Entrance ViewAll Images: < a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidleslieshistoryof02vanpa" > All Photos From Publication Click here to< a href =" https://archive.org/stream/leslieshistoryof02vanpa/leslieshistoryof02vanpa#page/n240/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > sight publication online to see this picture incontext in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Picture: ion, introduced reforms andeconomies anywhere possi-ble
, and also so rai ^ idly disposedof the pending suits that intwo years he had handled them all and as much more which had actually arisen. In spite of the wonderful accu-mulation of work hence disposed of, he substantially decreased the ex-penses of the workplace, and ended up being dis-tinguishcd for his spirit of reform.He resigned the placement in 1882, having, throughout the 7 years of hisincumbency, gained numerous notable lawful triumphs, as well as won a highreputation for legal ability and also exec ability. He warmly sup-ported Cleveland for President in 1884, and was called into his Cabi-net as Assistant of the Navy the adhering to spring. Although a smallnucleus for the new navy had actually been acquired during the precedingadministration, he should be attributed with having actually made the countryindependent in the matter. During his term there were finished orunder building five double-tun-eted screens, 2 coast-defensevessels, armorclads, three armored as well as five unarmored steel as well as Text Appearing After Photo: WII.I.IAM COLI.IXS WHITXKY. 214 BACKGROUND OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. iron rniisei-s, four iiuiihoats, and also a dynamite cruiser. lUit greater byfar

was liis aebieveuieiit iu securiug tlie establishmeut uf wurlcs iu thiscountry for creating shield plating aud forgiugs for guns, whichliad i) reviuusly been imported. Ior example, he caused the Beth-lehem Steel ^ orks to set up a brand-new plant. As a result, ^ hereas at thattime we sent out abroad for our materials, international nations are currently havingwarslii] s and large guns made in this country. In 1ST!” 2 he skillfullyled the Cleveland forces in the Democratic National Convention, btitrefused to return to public life. Similar power in personal life has actually made him a famous figureiu the monetary globe. He is greatly curious about Metropolitan Trac-tion safety and securities, and is a director of the Secondly Method Kailroad andthe Christoplior and Tenth Road Railway. He is a supervisor of theGuarantee Count on Firm, the Fifth Method Count on Firm, theNational Union Bank Keep in mind About Photos Please keep in mind that these pictures are extracted from scanned page photos that may have been digitally enhanced for readability- pigmentation as well as appearance of these pictures could not perfectly appear like the initial job. Photo from
web page 256 of “The photo background of the Civil War: in ten quantities” (1911 )< img alt =" credit scores monitoring" src=" https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3905/14762926875_688553c551.jpg" size= "400"/ > Image by< a href= "http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14762926875" >Web Archive Publication Images Identifier: photographichist06inmill Title:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidphotographichist06inmill" > The photographic background of the Civil Battle: in ten volumes Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1911" >

1911(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1910" > 1910s) Writers:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorMiller__Francis_Trevelyan__1877_1959" > Miller, Francis Trevelyan, 1877-1959< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorLanier__Robert_S___Robert_Sampson___1880_" > Lanier, Robert S.( Robert Sampson ), 1880- Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectWar_photography" > War photography Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisherNew_York___Review_of_Reviews_Co_" > New york city: Review of Reviews Co. Adding Collection:
< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorLincoln_Financial_Foundation_Collection" > Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection Digitizing Enroller: < a href= "https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorThe_Institute_of_Museum_and_Library_Services_through_an_Indiana_State_Library_LSTA_Grant" > The Institute of Gallery as well as Collection Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant Sight Publication Web page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/photographichist06inmill/photographichist06inmill#page/n256/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Visitor Concerning This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/photographichist06inmill" rel=" nofollow" > Brochure Access View All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidphotographichist06inmill" > All Pictures From Book Click right here to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/photographichist06inmill/photographichist06inmill#page/n256/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view publication online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this publication. Text Appearing Before Picture: to translucent the smoke, rose the main-mast almost as high as the maintop. While right here, a quartermas-ter fastened a rojje around him to keep him from dropping. However if acts of fearlessness are to be mentioned in informing ofMobile Bay, much credit scores has to be provided to the tiny Confed-erate gunboats, Morgan, Gaines, as well as Selma, that maintained araking fire which triggered great chaos amongst the progressing ves-sels. To the terrific ram Tennessee and the amazing fightthat she fought, honor schedules likewise. Her engines were hastilyconstructed, and of not enough toughness. She charged throughthe whole line; the Hartford dodged her, although it had beenthe wish of endure old Admiral Buchanans heart to sink theflagship. The Brooldyn had a narrow getaway, as well as the Mo-nongaliela, under Commander James H. Solid, attempted toram the Tennessee, as well as drove, bows on, against her side; thel) reduced hardty transformed the great rams instructions. The Ossipeeattempted to follow the Monongalielas lead, but the Tennessee [252] fiS ^ Text Showing up After Photo: COPvrtlGHT, 1911 TESTIMONIAL OF REVIEWS CO. LEADERS ON SEA AND LAND

— FARRAGUT AND GRANGER AFTER THE FIGHTOF MOBILE BAY This splendid image reveals the cahii and finely-molded attributes of the excellent admiral following the accomplishment of a feat whichsave in fearlessness oer-topped his fantastic success of the flow of the fts below New Orleans. Tliere Farragut had done what waspronoimced difficult, but at Mobile he had actually combated his way tlirough threats 10 times a lot more awesome. Right here,- ^ ith the discreetness whichever characterized him, he rests within the recorded Ft (iaines on Dauphin Island, reviewing with General Gordon Granger plansfor the combined assault through which Ft Morgan was taken on August 22, 1864. It was to Granger that Mobile ultimately gave up- passed in between them, and produced the Oneida, which was notunder steerageway. It went to this exciting minute that the monitors drew up, as well as the Winnebago, advancing, took her placement betweenthe ram as well as her seemingly defenseless target. T Note Concerning Photos Please note that these photos are removed from scanned page pictures that could have been electronically improved for readability– pigmentation as well as look of these illustrations may not flawlessly appear like the original job.

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Civil Defense sirens becoming examined (MSA)
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Image by MissouriStateArchives
Range Name: Commerce and Industrial Development Photo Range

Photographer/Studio: Massie, Gerald R.

Description: Three men crouch straight down, watching machine with microphone attachment that’s resting on the ground (sound-level monitor). These are generally taking records. People stand-in a semi-circle behind the crouching men, additionally using notes. Seems to be outside as everyone is wearing a coat.

Coverage: US – Missouri – Cole – Jefferson City

Date: November 20, 1951

Liberties: Copyright is in the general public domain.

Credit: Courtesy of Missouri State Archives

Image Number: CID_044-164

Institution: Missouri State Archives

Civil Defense (MSA)
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Image by MissouriStateArchives
Collection Name: Commerce and Industrial Development Photograph Range

Photographer/Studio: Massie, Gerald R.

Information: Office-like setting for protection monitorin, including phone providers at cubicles marked "Outgoing telephpone," men monitoring machines called "Disaster system," and a man in army dress speaking on the phone at a bigger table.

Coverage: Usa – Missouri – Cole – Jefferson City

Date: January 29, 1957

Legal rights: Copyright is in the community domain.

Credit: Courtesy of Missouri State Archives

Image Quantity: CID_044-162

Institution: Missouri State Archives

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Image from page 102 of “A naturalist in the Transvaal” (1892)
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Identifier: naturalistintran00dist
Title: A naturalist in the Transvaal
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Distant, William Lucas, 1845-1922
Subjects: Zoology — South Africa Transvaal Transvaal (South Africa) — Description and travel
Publisher: London, R.H. Porter
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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geological change in the surface condition of theearth, that those varieties of plants and animals onlysurvived which could in some way pass the severity of acompetitive examination by natural selection. Hence wemust not always expect to find a philosophical explanationof the bizarre colours of animals and plants by simplyconsidering their present conditions of life. If it isdifficult to trace the evolution of a civilized communityof mankind, with its customs and superstitions, to itsprimordial elements, many of which belong to a pre-historic period, how gigantic is the task to attempt to gobehind the very evolution of man himself! and yet it wasat that time when the small birds and insignificantinsects obtained the maximum of their colour-markings,not to add to the beauty of the scene, but to enable themto survive an eliminating process which took place in thegreat struggle for existence. Many of these gorgeousliving forms are to my mind fossils, of a past epochwhich we cannot read.

Text Appearing After Image:
THE MONITOR (Varanus niloticus). CHAPTER V. THROUGH WATERBERG. Scarcity of timber in the Transvaal.—Leave Pretoria fur Waterberg.—Waterless region of the Flats.— The Warm Baths.—Beautiful scenery.—Euphorbias and their poisonous qualities.—Fe^er districts.—TheMassacre at Makapans Poort.-—Sanguinary retribution at MakapansCave. — A fine orthopterous insect. — The Prospector.— Reptiles.—Ravages of the Australian Bug. — Majuba day. — Mimickinginsects. EARLY in the month of February I made a journeythrough the Waterberg district, to procure a supply andestimate the quantity that could be obtained of the besttanning-material of the country, the leaf of the tree Ihave already referred to (Colpoon compressinn}. As theindustry of the Transvaal progresses, an investigationof its tanning-products will doubtless be undertaken,for it can scarcely be credited that the few vegetablematerials now only known as available for a trade thatmust have a future adequately represe

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Image from page 316 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
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Identifier: railwaymechanica96newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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he machine was originally de-signed for a 24-in. maximum stroke, but arrangements weremade to have the stroke increased to 26 in., thus accom-modating slightly longer work. The machine is used forplaning shoes and wedges, trueing the seats of Economy steamchests, shaping back and main rod brasses, engine truckboxes, driving box cellars, piston rod keys, main rod keys,etc. Ample jxiwer is provided and when occasion arisesa cut of 1 1/16 in. or more can be taken on an oversizeddriving box shoe, the feed being about 1/32 in. and thecutting speed 40 ft. per min. Special features of the machine are the wide range ofwork which can be handled on it and the ease of changingfeeds and sjjeeds while watching the progress of the cuttingtool. A good idea of the range of work handled is affordedby Fig. 4. The machine may be shaping one of the bigmain rod brasses, or planing the extended driving box wedgein the foreground and the next minute be called on to shapethe small rod kev shown in the chuck.

Text Appearing After Image:
= .■. 4—Th.; Openside Planrjr nnd Some of Its Work A Fox monitor brass lathe, also installed with the othernew machines, finds very continuous and useful service. Itis used for general work in repairing and renewing parts ofinjectors, safety valves, boiler check valves, blow-off cocks,gage cocks, Ixiiler fittings and other cab fittings too numer-ous to mention. Six turret stations are j)rovided on thismachine and the ofierator has devclofX-d a large numberof s[)ecial tfwls and jigs by means of which the work is greatlyfar ilitated. Some of the jigs most commonly used, probably,arc thfjse developed for holding valve stem and piston rodpacking while l>cing bored. General Labor-Saving I)evicc» A continual effort has l>een made at Hot>oken to developdevices and methods which will save time or labor. One of the most interesting devices is a portable pneumatic oiler,credit for the development of which is due to M. R. Feeley,general foreman. Details of this oiler are shown in F

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Checking out alarms for Civil Protection (MSA)
credit monitoring
< img alt=" credit scores tracking" src =" https://www.free3creditreport.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/24031700035_345d4b6cdb.jpg" size =" 400"/ > Photo by< a href =" http://www.flickr.com/photos/62812729@N06/24031700035" > MissouriStateArchives Collection Name: Business and also Industrial Development Photo Collection Photographer/Studio: Massie, Gerald R. Summary: 3 men crouch down, observing device with microphone attachment that is relaxing on the ground( sound level monitor). They are making note. Various other people stand in a semi-circle behind the crouching guys, additionally remembering. Seems outdoors as everybody is wearing a coat Coverage: United States- Missouri- Cole -Jefferson City Day: November 20, 1951 Legal rights: Copyright is

in the general public domain name. Credit score: Thanks to Missouri State Archives Photo Number: CID_044-171 Institution: Missouri State Archives

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Image from page 677 of “The naval history of the Civil War” (1886)
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Identifier: navalhistoryofci00port
Title: The naval history of the Civil War
Year: 1886 (1880s)
Authors: Porter, David D. (David Dixon), 1813-1891
Subjects: Porter, David D. (David Dixon), 1813-1891 United States. Navy
Publisher: New York : Sherman Pub. Co. Des Moines, Iowa : Condit & Nelson
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: State of Indiana through the Indiana State Library

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ave been clue to the hurried performanceof a multiplicity of duties, or to the indis-cretion of a secretary. But it is the duty 664 THE NA VAL HISTORY of the historian to correct these discrepan-cies when they are manifest, where it canbe clone without raising questions thatmight end in angry controversies. There was published in the Army andNavy Journal, on the 16th of April, 1864, areview of the services of the Monitors inSouthern waters. Commander EdwardSimpson, in a report dated April 21st, ex-pressed himself as dissatisfied with theamount of credit given his vessel, thePassaic, in the official reports. On the29th of July, 1863, the Passaic went intoaction with Fort Wagner, followed by thePatapsco and the New Ironsides. Thepresence of the Passaic is not mentionedin Rear-Admiral Dahlgrens review. On the 31st of August, 1863, the most se-rious engagement in which the iron-cladshad yet taken part occurred between FortMoultrie on one side, and the MonitorsPatapsco, Weehawken, Passaic,

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COMMANDER (NOW REAR-ADMIRAE) EDWARD SIMPSON. and Nahant on the other; the detach-ment being under the command of Com-mander T. H. Stevens, on board the Pas-saic. During the action, the Passaicgrounded about half a mile from Fort Moul-trie, and was severely hammered by theguns of that work before she floated off.This affair was not mentioned in the re-view, though it was a much more seriousone than the engagements with Wagnerand Battery Gregg, on Morris Island. On the 8th of September, one of the mostremarkable actions between iron-clads andshore – batteries that ever occurred wasfought under command of CommodoreS. C. Rowan, between the batteries on Sullivans Island on the one side, and theNew Ironsides, Patapsco, Lehigh,Passaic, Nahant, and Weehawken(aground), on the other. This action lastedthree hours, and terminated in silencingthe fire of the batteries on the island. During this action, the Passaic was atthe head of the line, having received an or-der from the Commodore as she was

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Civil Defense on State Capitol grounds (MSA)
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Image by MissouriStateArchives
Collection Name: Commerce and Industrial Development Photograph Collection

Photographer/Studio: Massie, Gerald R.

Description: Man holds case with microphone device (sound level monitor) on top of mailbox in front of State Capitol building.

Coverage: United States – Missouri – Cole – Jefferson City

Date: November 20, 1951

Rights: Copyright is in the public domain.

Credit: Courtesy of Missouri State Archives

Image Number: CID_044-168

Institution: Missouri State Archives

Image from page 112 of “Massachusetts consistory of sublime princes of the royal secret, thirty-second degree of the Ancient and accepted Scottish rite for the northern jurisdiction of the United States, Boston, Massachusetts” (1908)
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Identifier: massachusettscon00rowe
Title: Massachusetts consistory of sublime princes of the royal secret, thirty-second degree of the Ancient and accepted Scottish rite for the northern jurisdiction of the United States, Boston, Massachusetts
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Rowell, Benjamin Winslow, 1846- [from old catalog] ed Richardson, Abert Lewis, 1846- [from old catalog] joint ed
Subjects: Freemasons, Boston
Publisher: [Boston, Mass., The Griffith-Stillings press]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ed all the grades in the York and ScottishRites, including the 33d, which was conferred upon him atBuffalo in 1895. He has been a constant and enthusiastic worker in thefraternity, serving as Worshipful Master of his Lodge in 1884and 1885, presiding over St. Andrews Royal Arch Chapter in1888, 1889, Boston Council of Royal and Select Masters in1878, 1879, and served as Eminent Commander of BostonCommandery Knights Templar from October, 1890, to October,1892. In 1887,1888, he was Thrice Potent Grand Master of BostonLodge of Perfection, and was elected Commander-in-Chief ofMassachusetts Consistory in December, 1894, serving theterm of three years in 1895, 1896, 1897, with great credit. During the first year of his administration, the MasonicTemple was partially destroyed by fire. The Consistory wasunable to secure adequate quarters during the repairs, butby Brother Hoi tons energy the meetings were continuedwithout interruption, and a satisfactory exhibit submitted atthe end of his term.

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Henry Noah Fisher 33° 66 Massachusetts Consistory HENRY NOAH FISHER 33° Brother Fisher is the son of Noah and Esther (Page) Fisher,and was born at Barton, Vt., June 5, 1842, and moved toWaltham, Mass., in 1859, when he became connected with theWaltham Watch Co. In July, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Thirty-fifth Massa-chusetts Volunteers, and was dangerously wounded two monthslater at the battle of Antietem, September, 1862. He remainedin the hospital many weeks, and was discharged for disability,March 4, 1863. The following year he was sent South by thetown of Waltham to distribute supplies to the towns soldiers. After the incorporation of the town as a city, Brother Fisherserved as Mayor for the years 1887, 1888, 1889 and 1890, andis still prominent in the financial and charitable institutions ofthe city. Brother Fisher was raised in Monitor Lodge, of Wal-tham, Aug. 1, 1865, dimitting to become a charter member ofIsaac Parker Lodge, of which he was elected Worshipful Masterfor t

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Image from page 178 of “Water reptiles of the past and present” (1914)
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Identifier: waterreptilesofp1914will
Title: Water reptiles of the past and present
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Williston, Samuel Wendell, 1851-1918
Subjects: Aquatic reptiles
Publisher: Chicago, Ill., The University of Chicago Press
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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semiaquaticconnecting links, called the aigialosaurs and described on a pre-ceding page, have set at rest all doubt as to their real affinities.They are real lizards, differing less from the living monitor landlizards than do the monitors from some other land lizards, espe-cially the amphisbaenas and chameleons. And to Adrian Camper SQUAMATA 167 is due the credit for the recognition of their real relationship,though it required more than a century to prove that he wasright. Very recently, and since the foregoing was written, a remarkablenew type of mosasaurs has been discovered in Alabama and Europe.Only fragmentary jaws, a few vertebrae, and some skull bones areknown, so that it is impossible yet to decide how closely the newform is related to the true mosasaurs, but so far as the evidencegoes the only distinguishable character is the teeth. These, insteadof being elongated and pointed, are nearly spherical, as shown inFig. 80. Such teeth could have been used only for crushing shell

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Fig. 80.—Globidens alabamensis. Part of mandible, with teeth, natural size.(From Gilmore.) fish, and not at all for the seizure and retention of slippery fishes.The genus, which was called Globidens by its discoverer, Mr. Gilmore,includes two known species, from Alabama and Europe, the latterrecently described by Dollo. It has been suggested that this pecu-liar kind of dentition was a more primitive or intermediate one, akind that the first mosasaurs had before they became fully adaptedto the water; but this is doubtful, since Globidens comes from lateCretaceous, and must be one of the later types. If Globidens is atrue mosasaur, and it seems to be one, its life-habits must havebeen remarkably different from those that have long been known.Possibly when the limbs and more of the skull are found, Globidenswill prove to be of a distinctive type. 168 WATER REPTILES OF THE PAST AND PRESENT SNAKES The chief differences between snakes and lizards have alreadybeen given and need not be rep

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Image from page 248 of “The poetical works of William Cowper. Complete edition, with memoir, explanatory notes, &c. ..” (1872)
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Identifier: poeticalwor00cow
Title: The poetical works of William Cowper. Complete edition, with memoir, explanatory notes, &c. ..
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: Cowper, William, 1731-1800
Subjects:
Publisher: London, F. Warne and co. New York, Scribner, Welford and Armstrong
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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pursued.To study culture, and with artful toilTo meliorate and tame the stubborn soil;To give dissimilar yet fruitful landsThe grain, or herb, or plant that each demands ;To cherish virtue in an humble state, 4 And share the joys your bounty may create;To mark the matchless workings of the powerThat shuts within its seed the future flower,Bids these in elegance of form excel,In colour these, and those delight the smell,Sends Nature forth, the daughter of the skies,To dance on earth, and charm all human eyes ;To teach the canvas innocent deceit,Or lay the landscape on the snowy sheet;These, these are arts pursued without a crime,That leave no stain upon the wing of time. Me poetry (or, rather notes that aimFeebly and vainly at poetic fame)Employs, shut out from more important views,Fast by the banks of the slow-winding Ouse;Content if, thus sequesterd, I may raiseA monitors, though not a poets praise,And while I teach an art too little known,To close life wisely, may not waste my own.

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THE DIVERTING HISTORY OP JOHN GILPIN, SHOWING HOW HE WENT FARTHER THAN HE INTENDED, AND CAMESAFE HOME AGAIN. 1782. The story of John Gilpins ride was related to Cowper by his friend, Lady Austen, whohad heard it as a child. It caused the poet a sleepless night, we are told, as he was keptawake by laughter at it. During these restless hours he turned it into the famous ballad.It appeared in the Public Advertiser, November 14th, 1782, anonymously. A celebrated actor named Henderson took it for one of his public recitations at Free-masons Hall. It became immediately so popular that it was printed everywhere—innewspapers, magazines, and separately. It was even sung as a common ballad in thestreets. It has preserved its popularity to the present date. The original John Gilpin was, it is said, a Mr. Beyer, a linendraper, who lived at theCheapside corner of Paternoster Row. He died in 1791, at the age of nearly a hundredyears. John Gilpin was a citizen Of credit and renown,A trainband capt

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Image from page 7 of “Scientific American Volume 87 Number 23 (December 1902)” (1902)
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Identifier: scientific-american-1902-12-06
Title: Scientific American Volume 87 Number 23 (December 1902)
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: scientific power niagara american apparatus electric silk gas power company scientific american spring blocks propeller shaft horse power american supplement niagara falls tific american niagara power canadian niagara
Publisher:

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BOW OF THE WYOMING AT 11.8 KNOTS.

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Bunsen tube, so that the desired increase in the pro-portion of .air was obtained, a high degree of tempera-ture produced and the resulting incandescence far ex-ceeded that of ordinary burners. This was furtherincreased by permitting the gas to becomeheated before entering the burner. This design is known as the Lucas lampand to the inventor is due the credit otproviding the gas industry with a meansof displacing electric arc lamps, for ourpopular gas arcs are the outgrowth of theLucas principle. MONITOR WYOMING DOING 12.37 KNOTS ON THE MEASURES MILE. A Curious Accident. A curious accident befell an electricstreet railroad car in the north of Englandrecently during a thunderstorm. At theterminus a car was waiting to begin ajourney, and several passengers had takentheir seats both inside and on the outsideof the car. There came a vivid flash oflightning, followed immediately by a ter-rific report on the car, and the whole in-terior of the vehicle seemed to be ablaze.When the flame had

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