Image taken from page 34 of ‘Funny Books for Boys and Girls. Struwelpeter. Good-for-nothing Boys and Girls. Troublesome Children. King Nutcracker and Poor Reinhold’

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Image taken from page 34 of ‘Funny Books for Boys and Girls. Struwelpeter. Good-for-nothing Boys and Girls. Troublesome Children. King Nutcracker and Poor Reinhold’
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Title: "Funny Books for Boys and Girls. Struwelpeter. Good-for-nothing Boys and Girls. Troublesome Children. King Nutcracker and Poor Reinhold"
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 11648.f.25."
Page: 34
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1856
Publisher: David Bogue
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000412221

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Image from page 239 of “The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment” (1911)
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Identifier: newbookofdogcomp01leig
Title: The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Leighton, Robert, 1859-1934
Subjects: Dogs
Publisher: London New York : Cassell
Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

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h nowadays, eitherat the exhibitions or on the running track ;in fact, a long-coated dog, however good itmight be as regards anatomy, would havea poor chance of winning a prize at a show,for its shaggy appearance would most likelyhide the graceful outline which is a muchadmired and characteristic feature. Of course the handicapper is a most im-portant personage, and it is very creditablethat amongst surroundings where temptationis so profuse, and could be embraced almostwith impunity, men are still at work whohave retained the confidence of the publicfor over thirty years. Such a one is Mr. 202 THE NEW BOOK OF THE DOG. Ralph Harper, of Kearsley, a mining hamletsituated half-way between Manchester andBolton. Probably no man living is sothoroughly acquainted with Whippet racingas he, in fact, it is pretty generally concededthat he has forgotten more about the sportthan most others know. Another trust-worthy handicapper is Mr. Large, of Wolver-hampton, whose bitch Nance is at the present

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MR. J. J. HOLGATES SHIRLEY DIXIEBY SHIRLEY BANNER SHIRLEY DAISY. time playing an important part in big events ;while Mr. Joe Chadwick, of Higginshaw,frequently takes charge of the very largestmeetings with credit to himself and to thesatisfaction of all interested. Reference has been made to the attendantwho releases the dog for a race. He isofficially termed a slipper ; and so muchdepends upon his efforts, that his abilityhas to be taken into account by the handi-capper, as will be seen by the followingrules, which, though somewhat quaintlyworded, can be easily understood, and arestill in force :— Ip_Any slipper not having slipped threewinners in 1905 will be allowed one yard ; orfour winners half a yard, and one yard in thefinal, or second day all through, providing heclaims and names his dog, before the first heat isrun, to the referee ; but must slip the dog allthrough till beaten. 2.—If a slipper claims allowance andthe dog is beaten first time through, he can claimthe same f

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Image from page 209 of “Our search for a wilderness; an account of two ornithological expeditions to Venezuela and to British Guiana” (1910)
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Identifier: oursearchforwild00nile
Title: Our search for a wilderness; an account of two ornithological expeditions to Venezuela and to British Guiana
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Niles, Blair Beebe, William, 1877-1962
Subjects: Natural history Birds
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and company

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on these, the pan was reversed for amoment, and then dipping his finger tips in the clear water ofour glass vial the yellow grains sank swiftly to the bottom.Sometimes only a half pennys worth would reward us, whileagain as much as a shillings value would be shown. Passing over the ridge we saw before us a deep and verynarrow valley with precipitous sides, down which we slid andcrawled, hanging on to vines and saplings to break our de-scent. At the bottom we found an interesting advance in theevolution of gold mining over the simplest form of gold pan-ning. Two blacks were operating a Long Tom, which in i86 OUR SEARCH FOR A WILDERNESS. mining vernacular is the name for a six by two, heavy, coarse,metal sieve set obliquely in the channel of a small brook.The gold-bearing gravel and clay is shovelled into it and pud-dled with a hoe, and the gold settles to the bottom to be laterpanned. Thus division of labor enters in — one blackshovelling while his partner puddles. We asked them how

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Fig. 84. Panning Gold. much they were getting out and, as usual, they said almostnothing, or a few shillings worth at the most! This wasto avoid any danger of their tiny holdings being consideredtoo valuable and taken away from them. Mr. Wilshire tooka pan here on another day and unearthed a tiny nugget,worth perhaps two shillings, much to the blacks discom-fiture, who hastened to explain that such an opulent A GOLD MINE IN THE WILDERNESS. 187 find was indeed rare. The poor fellows at best make littleenough and it was pitiful to see the tiny packets of gold dustwhich they-brought to the companys store at the end of theweek to exchange for food or credit checks. The universalGuianan name for this type of independent miner is pork-knocker, the explanation being that by knocking the rocksto pieces, they find just enough gold to procure the pork uponwhich they live. They are allowed to work on side streams near the largemining operations, their total taking of gold being relativelyinsigni

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