Image from page 219 of “Heat engineering; a text book of applied thermodynamics for engineers and students in technical schools” (1915)

A few nice platinum card images I found:

Image from page 219 of “Heat engineering; a text book of applied thermodynamics for engineers and students in technical schools” (1915)
platinum card
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Identifier: heatengineeringt00gree
Title: Heat engineering; a text book of applied thermodynamics for engineers and students in technical schools
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Greene, Arthur Maurice, 1872- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Thermodynamics
Publisher: New York [etc.] McGraw-Hill book company, inc.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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junction at t°C.Later one of the couples in the cylinder was used as the cold THE STEAM ENGINE 205 junction and the drop of temperature between these two wasmeasured. This method was somewhat similar to that used by Prof.E. Hall of Harvard (Trans. A. I. E. E., 1891) but his resultswere not very extensive. To find the temperature of steam the authors used a platinumresistance thermometer in the cylinder 3 in. from the face of thepiston and also one in a small %-in. hole in the center of thepiston head. To get the temperature at a definite point in the stroke byany couple or platinum thermometer a pair of revolving brusheswere attached to the shaft. One brush made contact with acentral copper tube and the other with a sector mounted on acircular disc. The sector was one-thirtieth of a circumferencein length. The disc could be rotated and by a scale and vernierthe position of the crank for any observation could be read. Anumber of sectors on the disc reduced the amount of motion neces-

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42 45 48 51 Fig. 87.—Indicator card marked with points at various sixtieths of a revolu-tion. From 20 X 40 engine. sary. To facilitate the change of circuit to different couples,mercury cups were used. To show the results of these tests, Fig. 88 has been constructedfrom the card, Fig. 87 by finding the saturation temperature forpressures of the steam at points corresponding to definite crankangles. This temperature from the steam tables is plotted tosixtieths of a revolution, giving the curve. The marks X givepoints similar to the results shown by the platinum thermometerwhile the points marked O show the temperatures of the ther-mometer in the steam space in the cylinder head. The curvesillustrating the variation of temperature of the metal at 3^5 in.from the inside surface in the head and that at holes in the sideat 4 in. from end are shown to a larger scale above the card.These curves are ideal and are drawn to indicate the results ofCallendar and Nicolson. 206 HEAT ENGINEERING T

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Image from page 431 of “The American annual of photography” (1914)
platinum card
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Identifier: americanannualof28newy
Title: The American annual of photography
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Photography
Publisher: New York : Tennant and Ward
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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ia Sensitizing Powder ROYALINE produces sepia prints of Platinum like qualities. Itcan be applied to paper, cards, linen, silk, etc., producing upondevelopment in water rich platinum like sepia prints. It is as sim-ple to use as the Blue Print Process, Each tube makes two ouncesof Sensitizing solution. Try it. You will be delighted with theresults. Price per tube, 25 cents, postpaid EAGLE MORTAR ANDPESTLE GRADUATE This is a four-ounce Graduate, with the bottom espe-cially reinforced, so as to make it act as a mortar. Itis also supplied with a Pestle, one end of which is roundand the other end flat, for breaking up crystals. The bottom of the graduate on the inside is roundedso that no sediment can collect, and so that all crystalscan readily be reached by the pestle and broken up. This is an excellent article and costs very little morethan the ordinary Engraved Graduate. Price, 50 cents, postpaid GEORGE MURPHY, Inc., 57 E. 91hSt., New York Send for new retail mail order cash catalogue

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XXX Practical, Simple, Successful PHOTOGRAPHY in NATURAL COLORS ^^ by the HilcLaje^ Process Duplicating Method Results Certain and Uniform No Unusual Chemicals Employed No Unfamiliar Processes Involved

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Image from page 362 of “Chemical lecture experiments” (1901)
platinum card
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Identifier: chemicallecturee00bene
Title: Chemical lecture experiments
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Benedict, Francis Gano, 1870-1957
Subjects: Chemistry
Publisher: New York, Macmillan
Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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at the platinum jet insidethe chimney. The escaping gas may be lighted at the topof the chimney and there simultaneously appears a flame ofgas burning in air and a flame of air burning in gas. Itmay be necessary to choke the piece of combustion-tubingby means of a small cork with a slit cut in one side, to pre-vent too large a volume of air from entering the chimneythrough the tube. By properly regulating the supply ofcoal gas and the admission of air, a flame 2 or 3 cm. highis easily obtained. While the two flames do not appear markedly different, itwill be found on thrusting a piece of paper or a visitingcard on the end of a wire through the opening at the top ofthe chimney into the inner flame, that only that portion ofthe card will be burned which is actually in the flame itself.By carefully inserting the card, a picture of the flame maybe obtained by charring the card. Apparatus (Fig. 143); lamp chimney ; corks and tubes ; asbestos or T»Y» aco r»ov» RECIPROCAL COMBUSTION 343

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Fig. 144 4. Combustion of air in hydrogen. — By using an apparatussimilar to that shown in Fig. 143, in which, however, thelarge glass tube in the cork has a U rather than a straightform, the combustion of air in hydrogen may be wellstudied. The apparatus is shown inFig. 144, and consists of a lamp chim-ney provided with a two-holed cork atthe bottom, carrying a small glass elbowand a large U-tube 1 cm. in diameter.Each end of the U-tube should be pro-vided with a platinum tip (Ex. 3). Acork should be inserted in the top ofthe chimney and hydrogen admitted.After all the air is expelled, the hydro-gen escaping from the outer limb of theU-tube is ignited. On removing the corkfrom the top of the chimney, the flame recedes through theU-tube, and soon appears burning at the other end inside thechimney as a flame of air burning in an atmosphere of hydro-gen. On again inserting the cork in the top of the chimney,the hydrogen will escape through the U-tube, and the flamerecede and appear as

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.