Cool Personal Finance images

A few nice personal finance images I found:

Image from page 672 of “Hardware merchandising September-December 1919” (1919)
personal finance
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: hardmerchsepdec1919toro
Title: Hardware merchandising September-December 1919
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
nada Steel Goods Co., Limited Hamilton, Canada 14 HARDWARE AND METAL—Advertising Section November l, 1919 Buy and Induce Others To Buy The Merchants of Canada would be the first tofeel any slackening in the buying power of thepeople. You have a lot at stake. Until the Victory Loan 1919 is over—and a suc-cess—strain every effort to help. Support the Victory Loan 1919 with all theenergy you give to your own business. Your customers are your friends. Dont lose a single opportunity to impress themwith the importance of putting the Victory Loan1919 across. This is a case where National pros-perity, and your own personal interest, are one. And you cant successfully induce others to buyVictory Bonds unless you yourself own a bigblock. Canada has a big block of Victory Bonds on hand. And thev must be sold ! Issued by Canadas Victory LoanCommittee in co-operation with theMinister of Finance of the Domin-ion of Canada. 52-P November 1, 1919 HARDWARE A±<D METAL—Advertising Section 15

Text Appearing After Image:
WHEN GRANDFATHER FIRST READBY THE KEROSENE LAMP /^VNE evening in 1826, Grandfather removed the candlestickV^ and waxed taper from the table and lighted a new con-traption which he called a kerosene lamp. But it was not untilnearly thirty years later that mineral oil lamps, improved andperfected, began generally to displace the wax tapers and thelamps which produced light from animal oils. Two years before the first kerosene lamp was lighted,, nearlyforty years before the discovery of petroleum in America, theworkers at Plymouth began making rope — rope so good that whenthe demand came for drilling cables to open up the vast stores ofpetroleum beneath the earths surface, Plymouth wasready, and for sixty years Plymouth Drilling Cableshave played a very important part in the production ofpetroleum. For every rope and cable use Plymouth deliversfull value and more. ISIr Plymouth rope PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANYNorth Plymouth, Mass. Welland, Canada No. 3 16 HARDWARE AND METAL—Advertising

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 361 of “The South : a tour of its battlefields and ruined cities, a journey through the desolated states, and talks with the people ; being a description of the present state of the country, its agriculture, railroad, business and finances
personal finance
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: southtourofitsba7228trow
Title: The South : a tour of its battlefields and ruined cities, a journey through the desolated states, and talks with the people ; being a description of the present state of the country, its agriculture, railroad, business and finances ; giving an account of Confederate misrule, and of the sufferings, necessities and mistakes, political views, social condition and prospects, of the aristocracy, middle class, poor whites and Negroes ; including visits to patriot graves and rebel prisons, and embracing special notes on the free labor system, education and moral elevation of the freemen, also, on plans of reconstruction and inducements to emigration ; from personal observations and experience during months of Southern travel
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Trowbridge, J. T. (John Townsend), 1827-1916
Subjects: Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
Publisher: Hartford, Conn. : L. Stebbins
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
sed the flower ofhis years in bondage ; and his mother was an old woman,living to thank God that her son was free at last. The master,a rich man, had as vet no idea of the existence of that will, bywhich he was to be held responsible for the payment of overforty years. wages to his unlawful bondman. From another of these documents, made by a white master,I copied the following suggestive paragraph : It is also mylast will and desire that my beloved wife Sally Dandridge,and my son Harrison, and my daughtei^s Charity and Julia,should be free : and it is my wish and desire for them to beemancipated hereafter, and for them to remain as free people.Another paragraph gave them property. This will, like nearly SUPPRESSION OF WILLS. 345 L. all the rest, had been registered and proved; and, like them, ithad been suppressed, — the beloved wife and son and daughtersremaining in bondage, until the slave system went down withthe RebeUion, and a day of judgment came with the Freed-mens Bureau. Jk

Text Appearing After Image:
lip BieiUi otTlvij r»MWIM ■ ■ it^uWP —CMM»^a—awn——MW—MW^^—J1 A MISSISSIPPI STEAMBOAT. 347 CHAPTER XLIX. DOWN THE MISSISSIPPI. At Memphis I took passage in a first-class Mississippi steam-packet for Vicksburg. It was evening when I went on board.The extensive saloon, with its long array of state-rooms oneach side, its ornamental gilt ceiling, and series of dazzlingchandeliers, was a brilliant spectacle. A corps of light-footedand swift-handed colored waiters were setting the tables, —bringing in baskets of table-cloths, and spreading them ; im-mense baskets of crockery, and distributing it; and trajs ofsilver, which added to the other noises its ringing and jinglingaccompaniment. About the stove and bar and captains office,at the end of the saloon, was an astonishing crowd of passen-gers, mostly standing, talking, drinking, buying tickets, play-ing cards, swearing, reading, laughing, chewing, spitting, andfilling the saloon, even to the ladies cabin at the opposite

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.