Nice New Car Loan photos

A few nice new car loan images I found:

Image from page 929 of “Electric railway journal” (1908)
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Identifier: electricrailway531919newy
Title: Electric railway journal
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Electric railroads
Publisher: [New York] McGraw Hill Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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CASTLE JUNCTION, THE GATHERING POINT FOR ALLCARS AT BELFAST(Note booth where traffic regulators make out reports) is still the only signal device, but push-button signalsavailable for both the passenger and the conductor areunder consideration. Although illuminated roller destination signs arecarried over both dash and step, the management isconsidering the installation of a big route number signwhich would be carried from the upper deck so that aprospective passenger would be sure to see it even ifa large motor truck or wagon happened to be obscuring the lower deck of the car. Route information boardsare placed over the central window of all cars as incommon British practice. An unusual—and appreciated—feature of Belfast carequipment is the installation of Neill clocks. These areelectrically operated by means of two Western Electric2-volt dry cells, Bluebell type. The accuracy of these

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BELFAST DOUBLE-DECK CAR USED DURING AWAR-LOAN RALLY clocks has helped many a passenger make his train. From the foregoing account, it is apparent thatBelfast rolling stock does not differ materially fromthe usual British double-deck car. In a later issuedata will be published concerning the maintenance ofthis equipment, more particularly the wheels and axles.The second part of this present Belfast article, to bepublished in the May 24 issue, will show how fareincreases have been successfully worked out and howthe fares are collected and accounted for. Making Change on Safety Cars IN CONNECTION with the establishment of safety-car service in Hartford, Conn., Manager W. P.Bristol of the Hartford division of The ConnecticutCompany made a graphic demonstration of the time thatit lost in making change on trolley cars. Mr. Bristol had as his guests, on a trial trip of asafety car, a number of newspaper men and othercitizens of Hartford. He supplied each man with a halfdollar and also with 6

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Image from page 187 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)
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Identifier: locomotiveengine11hill
Title: Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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o kindly loaned usthe photographs from which the engrav-ings were made, we show pictures ofthree old Baltimore & Ohio locomotivesthat form interesting links between thesmall earlier types and the heavy modernengines of to-day. A letter from Mr. O. C. Cromwell,chief draftsman of the Baltimore & Ohio,^ives some particulars about Nos. 32 and tied together at this point with a crossbrace, which in turn supported the boilerwith a bracket bolted against the throatsheet. Engine 117—The Perkins engines nowhave ig x 26-inch cylinders, but this en-gine was probably built with difTerent-sized cylinders, of which you probablyhave information. The drivers are now60 inches; but I think you stated to methat they were originally 64^^ inches. Thecrown sheet was supported by crown bars.We find an old drawing of this boiler withthe combustion chamber with which shewas first built. g g i We are informed that the case of theSt. Louis Car Coupler Company vs. theNational Malleable Castings Company

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OLD BALTIMORE & OHIO LOCOMOTIVES. Water space—Back and sides, 3^i inches: front, 4 inches.Tubes: Material—Iron. Number—295. Diameter outside—2 inches; No. 12, B. W. G.Length between tube plates—14 feet 4^4 inches.Heating surface:Tubes, exterior—2,217.16 square feet.Firebox—192.96 square feet.Total, with exterior tube area—2,410.12 square feet.Miscellaneous:Exhaust nozzle, diameter—$% inches.Smokestack, smallest diameter — 16 inches, straight.Smokestack, hight from rail to top—15 feet 154 inches. 117, but the identity of No. 238 appearsto be lost. Mr. Bell says that the onlyparticulars he has about the engines arethat they were the first Baltimore & Ohiopassenger engines with cylinders 17 x 24inches, drivers 66 inches diameter andsmallest ring of boiler 46.5-^ inches. Fiveof these engines were built in 1865, andhad stationary links. All the engines were built in the earlysixties. Nos. 32 and 238 having been de-signed by J. Perkins, master mechanic ofthe ro

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Image from page 237 of “Popular science monthly” (1913)
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Identifier: popularsciencemo8313newy
Title: Popular science monthly
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Technology Science
Publisher: New York : McClure, Phillips and Co.
Contributing Library: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

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ize on the surface, so a stirring boy, or rayandero, isemployed to break up the film and make it settle. Five or six days arenecessary to complete the crystallizing process. A large plant mayhave 300 or more bateas, capable of holding more than 1,000,000 gallonsof caldo, and yielding at each full charge as much as 2,500 tons ofnitrate. When crystallization has gone as far as it will, a valve in the bottomof the batea is opened and the liquid is drawn off, leaving behind a thicklayer of glistening white crystals. This is the nitrate or salitre ofcommerce, being 95 per cent, or more of pure nitrate of soda; theremainder is largely water and salt. The liquid which is drawn off,known as agua vieja, or mother liquor, still contains a large amount ofnitrate in solution, and is used over and over again in the boiling tanks.In fact, no water is ever thrown away, the only loss being that whichpasses into steam from the boiling tanks and evaporates from the crys- 222 THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY

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Photograph loaned by Mr. C. E. Atwood, Antofagasta, Chile. Nitrate in the cancha, being bagged and put on cars for shipment.In the left background, a big accumulation of ripio. tallizing pans. The finished nitrate is shoveled from the bateas intocars, drawn to the deposit, or canclia, and there after drying for severaldays is bagged ready for shipment. Shipment in bulk is impracticablebecause the nitrate so readily absorbs water. Even when shipped insacks it sometimes becomes caked in the holds of ships and has to betaken out with picks. From the agua vieja, iodine is extracted by a simple process of pre-cipitation with chemicals (mainly sodium sulphites). It figures onlyas an important by-product of the industry, for the iodine trustmakes an annual allotment to each establishment, commonly less thanwhat could be made in a month, if there were no restrictions onproduction. The .only other important step in the refining of nitrate is the clear-ing and recharging of the boiling tanks. F

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.