Image from page 420 of “Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago” (1921)

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Image from page 420 of “Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago” (1921)
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Identifier: olcottslandvalue181928geoc
Title: Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Geo. C. Olcott & Co
Subjects: Real property Real property Real property Real property Zoning
Publisher: Chicago : Geo. C. Olcott
Contributing Library: The Newberry Library
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

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Page I6S OLCOTTS LAND VALUES BLUE BOOK AIEAIORANDA Page ISO 159 A ISOO Atv-e M \\ 7 ?^ 2SOO <?ooo ^W. lOTI^ TTVT- 2000Ac-re 9N^^3000 5;;^-J Acre I ;: 60 MORGAIjCW. 111^ nso A<ur« ^2?^ ELDORADO KIRKWOOD WIL M 1- ST LJ 2 0 0 00 < oc (T 0 ~ (T – 3. < feo I u &0 0 /oo so- iO ^ JOOO – t U yx,- Wl S^ [lin ■□• 0 = i 00 00 ^2000 Acre 0 J 0 0 t Q = fj V^ 3V! PL 9| *^ 1 Or 1 Z .. ^2500 A.–e a. w.iio- 1 10 lO 1 1 tit) VH I ion 7 Q -1 99 0 ;; < -^ 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 On0 .■^It: Page 16SA. OLCOTTS LAND VALUES BLUE BOOK Irvin Jacobs & Co. Real Estate First Mortgages Low Interest Rates Small Commission Charges Prompt Service 105 South La Salle StreetCHICAGO Telephone Randolph 2350 S5S2525H5E5E5H5E5E5HSH5E5E5H5ESH5H5E5H525ES2SE5E52S25H5E5H5E5H5E52SH5ESHSSS2SHSH5H5HSH525?SES25H52SH5Ea 160 Page 151

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Image from page 24 of “The city and county of San Diego : illustrated and containing biographical sketches of prominent men and pioneers” (1888)
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Identifier: citycountyofsand00vand
Title: The city and county of San Diego : illustrated and containing biographical sketches of prominent men and pioneers
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Van Dyke, Theodore S. (Theodore Strong), b. 1842 Leberthon, T. T Taylor, A
Subjects: San Diego County (Calif.) San Diego (Calif.)
Publisher: San Diego, Cal[if.] : Leberthon & Taylor
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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as often in debt and seldom much ahead. In many other respects, San Diego County farming was about theworst in the world. Make no machinery that you can buy, and donothing yourself that you can hire anyone else to do, seemed to be thecardinal principle. Nearly all were farming, not for something to eat oruse on the farm, but for something to haul many miles to market to sellat a low price, to buy provisions at a high price, to haul all the wayhome again to eat. Never did it take men so long to learn anything.Oneman would lose a hundred chickens by wildcats and cayotes beforehe would learn to shut the coop at night. Another would lose his gar-den or young vines two or three years in succession before discoveringthat a rabbit-proof fence was the first and not the last requisite. Otherfarmers seemed to forget everything they ever knew before. Men who,in Illinois, planted corn forty inches apart in rows straight both waysand cultivated it constantly until it was too high to drive through,

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>-^. •J 1 PROGRESS OF FARMING. ETC. 15 planted it here in rows but twenty inches apart, crooked both ways, andnever afterward touched it. The same was done with potatoes and allkinds of produce planted in hills or rows. And though Heavenrewarded their folly as it deserved, yet year after year, as the springcame around, they went through the same old ceremony, as if trying anew experiment in a new country. The same thing may be seen to-dayin too many places. Yet, in spite of all this carelessness, coupled withhigh rates of interest and high prices for all manner of goods andmachinery, the farmers of this county generally lived better, had morespare time, more spare change, and fewer mortgage foreclosures thanthe farmers of any other State. The absence of rain, hail, etc., insummer and the difference in the cost of getting through the winter,more than overbalanced all else. For several years, beginning about 1869, bee-keeping was im-mensely profitable, and in the warm days of winte

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