Image from page 19 of “The Farm-poultry” (1901)

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Image from page 19 of “The Farm-poultry” (1901)
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Identifier: farmpoultry1224unse
Title: The Farm-poultry
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Poultry Northeastern States Periodicals Poultry Industry Northeastern States Periodicals
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : I.S. Johnson and Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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or varieties,with provision made for recording of muchother data besides the number of eggs pro-duced. Opposite the record sheet for eachmonth is a page of Timely Notes. Thepart of the book devoted to advertising theHumphrey machines is also interesting, andthe book as a whole is a dignified and credit-able piece of advertisjng. Sliarples Cre.tm SepiiiMtoi-s make cows pay. Book,Business Dairj ing aud Cat249 free. W. Cliester, Pa. WINNING WINNINGS TODAY, The shows can not begin too early or be too big to find Dustons White Wyandottes In tlie winnings. Already tills fall lias his stock called time on llie competitors of liis cusldiners, IN THE LAKGE.ST AS WELL AS THE SMALLER SHOWS OF THE COUNTRY. AVltli more than 3000 select to select dont you think he can turn the trick for vou ? Can also mate youpairs, trios or pens lo produce exhibition and breeders. Write your wauts aud send 5c. sLimp for handsomestIoultry catulojiue puljlisliod. ARTHUR G. DUSTON, 223 East Main St., Marlboro, Mass.

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■the: National Fruit Grower Is the Largest Horticultural and Fruit Trade Pub-lication West of New York. Published monthly at ST. JOSEPH, MICHIGAN iinuiBifflt and the final sale in the market. It^ tells the prowerB who they may safe-? ly send their goods to In the citiesnpnfelofthe country, puardl them from^ Trees and Plants and Treatment ofiSi;! l| ■ ■rthe wiles of snide commiB«ion<Ct fame. You will like it, if vou grow-n-i-U ill 3 : houses, and Rives just the informa- i^J o «r «ir,o iifioiia tt-Tth PiPi-r-rlinU aISBw r tion the grower needs, whelher he 1631-he an amateurorprofesRlonsl. Iub-iield to the market, includini: vari-^ – lishes market reports from difTerent eties, cultivation, tranBportation, ;iiiintiir«ii;iMiiniii]iiniiiii:iiiii h i i cities, giving a summary of prices. Keeps you pooled on Horticulture, 2 iJHCrop ConditionB. Irices of Fruit rWl Products In the nillerent Markets, ^Nljh.Vi{ Fruit Trade Matters; Diseases of^ . Trees and Plants and Treatment of iSC

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Image from page 134 of “Report of the Commission of 1906 to Investigate the Condition of the Blind in the State of New York” (1907)
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Identifier: reportofcommissi00unse
Title: Report of the Commission of 1906 to Investigate the Condition of the Blind in the State of New York
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: J. B. Lyon Company, State Printers
Contributing Library: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc., M. C. Migel Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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twenty-one years of age, so that theadults, who are so greatly in the majority, could not enter if theywould; and it may well be supposed that but few would become in-mates of them, if they could. The plan of home teaching is, there-fore, a necessity for the adults, and emj)loyment could easily befound for a dozen more teachers, to search out and teach the blindof Pennsylvania alone. This Society devotes its efforts, free of charge, to the blindof all classes, without distinction of age, sex, color, nationality, orreligion The lot of the blind is indeed a sad one! Added to theiraffliction, oftentimes, is a dependence upon friends or relativesfor support; and it is no uncommon experience that blind per-sons have literally to sit in darkness and solitude, with nothingto occupy them but their own thoughts. But a change comes oer the scene when the embossed typeis handed to the blind ones by the home teacher, who comes witha word of cheer — Lighting up the darkness,Scattering the gloom.

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nO.MK IhAllIIXC ] ni; Tin; III.INII ]1Y A SIGHTLESS TEACHER. New York Association for the Blind. Commission on the Blind. 65 Despondency gives way to hope and joy soon follows, as theytrace the simple embossed characters, and, after one or twolessons, are able once more to read for themselves. This society is supported by annual subscriptions, direct con-tiibutions, legacies and donations, which amounted in 1905 to,422.46. Of this amount ,577.82 was disbursed, the balancebeing placed to the credit of the general, the publication, and thefemale teachers funds. The society paid 0 for the maleteachers salary and traveling expenses and 9.35 for those ofthe lady teacher. The secretary of the Commission attended the annual meetingof the Society in January, 1907, when similar reports were givenfor the past year. These reports showed a steady growth in thework of the Society, an increase in the number of persons in-structed and in the circulation of embossed literature. Thus, for th

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Image from page 26 of “Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania” (1899)
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Identifier: reportofbureauof1898penn
Title: Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines
Subjects: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines Coal mines and mining
Publisher: [Harrisburg] : The Bureau
Contributing Library: The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nrivalled coking coal fields, containedwiihin the Blairville basin, from Jacobs creek, its northern bound-ary, to Uniontown and Fairchance, without a break, or from its vastand practically untouched gas and steam coal territory held withinthe Lisbon trough, between the Youghiogheny and Monongahelarivers, this county, or at least its western half, is destined to be-come a vast supply station from which thousands of tons of highgrade fuel wealth are to be distributed far and wide, to meet the wantsof distant communities. This Connellsville seam of coal yields from 8 to 10 feet of work-able coal. The coal is clean, almost free from slate and sulphur, re-markably soft, easily mined and uniform in quality and thickness.The purity of this coal and its chemical and physical characteristicsuTake it peculiarly adapted for coking and gives it great value. It iseasily mined, and cokes with but little care. It is this ease of mining and coking that makes it possible to put coke from this districl

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Coking Pnrrss No. 11. BUREAU OF MINES. xxi iu competition with cokes and fuels in the juost distant parts ofthe United States. History and Growth. During the past quarter of a century many of our largest indus-tries have made their most noticeable advancement, yet none hasmade more rapid strides or been of greater importance and valuethan tlie manufacture of coke. The date of the first production ofcoke is iu doubt. By some authorities it is claimed that it was usedin the United States some years prior to 1770. Be this as it may,the best authenticated history gives Isaac Meason credit for thefirst production of coke in the Connellsville region. In 181G and 1817he built the first rolling mill erected west of the Allegheny moun-tains, at Ilumsock, Fayette county, and this mill went into opera-tion in September of the latter year. The coke was used in the re-hneiy and was made in Fayette county. In 1836, F. H. Oliphantbegan the use of coke as a fuel in Fairchance Furnace. From abouttiiat

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