Image from page 26 of “Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium fishes; a complete guide to aquaria and related subjects” (1917)

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Image from page 26 of “Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium fishes; a complete guide to aquaria and related subjects” (1917)
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Identifier: goldfishvarietie00inne
Title: Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium fishes; a complete guide to aquaria and related subjects
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Innes, William T. (William Thornton), 1874-1969
Subjects: Aquariums Goldfish
Publisher: Philadelphia, Innes
Contributing Library: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

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Fii.. 7. Prizewixnixg Scai.ei.kss Tklkscoi-k (jdi.ih ism(Reduced onc-quartcrl Tliis fish won the Diploma of Honor in 1907 as tlie l)cst fisli (anyclass) owned. Altliougii no special attention was paid to l)roadtails atthis time, there were quite a numher of them, tliis l)eing a good specimen.

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Fjg. 8. Prizewinning Veiltail Moor (Reduced one-third) This is considered to be one of the finest black goldfishes ever bred. The short,deep body, the sail-like dorsal fin, the large, clear eyes, the broad flowing tails, thevelvety black color combined with good lines and style make this remarkable fish apattern which we might hope to equal but hardly to surpass. Chapter Two Goldfish Varieties 20 GOLDFISH VARIETIES A^D THE GOLDFISH There are two root-stocks from which the goldfishes of to-day haveoriginated. Both are members of the carp family. The European gold-fish, Carassius carassius, has never been developed into any of the fancyforms except by crossing with cultivated types of the Asiatic stock, Ca-rassius anratus. The Orientals, principally those of Korea, China andJapan must be given credit for first establishing, by selective breeding,the goldfish as an ornamental pet as well as for the incredible lengths towhich they have gone in fixing fancy breeds. Of this more will be sai

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Image from page 222 of “Apes and monkeys; their life and language” (1900)
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Identifier: apesmonkeystheir00garn
Title: Apes and monkeys; their life and language
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Garner, Richard Lynch, 1848-1920
Subjects: Monkeys Speech Sound production by animals
Publisher: Boston and London, Ginn & company
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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sfingers in this crack and try to open the door. He hasnot been able to unlock it when the key is given him,although he knows the use of the key and has often triedit; but his keeper has never imparted the secret to him,and his method of using the key has been to prise with it orpull it, instead of turning it after putting it in the keyhole. The young keeper, Mr. Webb, deserves great credit forhis untiring attention to this valuable young ape, and theresults of his zeal are worthy of the recognition of everyman who is interested in the study of animals. Another specimen that may be regarded as an inter-mediate type was recently kept in Bellevue Gardens atManchester. He was playful and full of mischief. Hehad been taught to use a stick or broom in fight, and withsuch a weapon in his hand he would run all over the build-ing, hunting some one to attack. He did not appear to beserious in his assault, but treated it as fun. It is a badthing to teach to apes, because they grow pugnacious as

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MR. CROWLEY, LATE OF THE NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN(Taken from Life.) 200 APES AND MONKEYS they grow older, and all animals kept closely confinedacquire a bad temper. In an adjoining cage was kept a young orang, and thetwo ate at the same table. The chimpanzee appeared toentertain a species of contempt for the orang. The keeperhad taught him to pass the bread to. his neighbor, but heobeyed with such reluctance that his manner betrayedmore disgust than kindness. A few small pieces of breadwere placed on a tin plate, and the kulu was required tolift the plate in his hand and offer it to the orang beforehe himself was allowed to eat. He would lift the plate afew inches above the table and hold it before the orangsface ; when the latter had taken a piece of the bread, thechimpanzee withdrew the plate, held it for a moment, anddropped it. Meanwhile he kept his eyes fixed on theorang. The manner in which he dropped the plate lookedas if he did so in contempt. When the meal was finished,the

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