Image from page 953 of “Rod and gun” (1898)

A few nice discover card images I found:

Image from page 953 of “Rod and gun” (1898)
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Identifier: rodguncan13cana
Title: Rod and gun
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Canadian Forestry Association
Subjects: Fishing Hunting Outdoor life
Publisher: Beaconsfield, Que. [etc.] Rod and Gun Pub. Co. [etc.]
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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wing in the corner near his bed.He called Jack, who told him he wascrazy and to go to sleep. But it wasntso easy to convince Charlie that he wasa victim of nightmare and in a very shorttime Jack was also convinced of the factby feeling something run across him onthe bed clothes. Reaching out to wherehe had left a candle and striking a matchto light it, what should he discover butthat his visitors were three skunks thathad dropped in just for sociability.Realizing this and not being desirous of The night before we left we also had avisit from a lynx, but he wasnt evenas hospitable as the skunks, for he justjumped on the roof, ran across it, andwhen we moved to the door to let him in,disappeared as quickly as he had come. e reached Mulock and the firstmorning drew our first blood, Jack get-ting a fine, big, six-point buck of abouttwo hundred and fifty pounds. Beinglucky enough to get him within a shortdistance of an old cadge-road it was nota difficult matter to trail him to the rail-

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Johnston and Big Buck. The Author and his Two Hundred and Twenty Five FoundBuck. their company at that hour of the night,the boys covered themselves up, headsand all and left the skunks to their owndevices. When morning came theyawakened to find them gone withouthaving so much as left a card sayingthey had called. On account of leavinga day or so after we were unable to re-turn the visit as Charlie was very desir-ous of doing, especially as he wished toshow them some new traps he had justobtained. road. That night he went to North Bayon a flat car, Johnson going down withhim and coming back the next day witha bag of fresh bread and some other goodthings which we had found to be gettinglow. The first week ended with only onedeer but we were by no means discour-aged and as we were on more familiarground we felt very hopeful. Here, therailway runs North and South and whenthe hunter knows that all he has to do is I A SATISFACTORY HUNTING TRIP IN NORTHERN ONTARIO 929 to travel east or west

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Image from page 498 of “The street railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev06amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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s of people in the country to pick upa good improvement, or even investigate its merits,than the managers of eastern roads, who expend thou-sands upon thousands of dollars every year unnecessa-rily in the operation of their roads where the old-fash-ioned systems of time cards and -large numbers ofstations are used. There is no reason why the service of an electric orcable railway, improperly managed, should not be lookedupon as being even worse than the horse car, which occa-sionally does reach its destination on time, even thoughit may come two-thirds of the way with one set ofwheels off the track, while there is every reason in theworld wh)- the service of such roads, properly managed,should surpass anything ever introduced. A few things which are not only unpleasant to thepublic, and very expensive to the company, that aredaily experienced in the operation of over half the elec-tric and cable railways throughout the country at thisadvanced age (and for which we now have a thorough,

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dispatchers office LOS ANGELES RAILWAY. 486 (^lJicd5^aUiw2iy5^yW* practical and cheap remedy) are the delas and inter-ferences to the traffic; such as an electric car breaking atrolley, breaking an axle, burning out an armature orbecoming disabled in other ways which cannot berepaired while on the road; as well as accidents andjumping the track. Where the ordinary system of run-ning cars on time cards and bj starters is used, the latterbeing at the ends of the roads only, are unable toobserve any trouble or interference to the traffic that maybe going on, until they find that the cars have stoppedcoming, and discover that they are all blocked at somepoint on the road. As is a natural result, where so muchof the companys business interests and welfare areentrusted to the judgment of the trainmen, before it ispossible for a person to catch a car going in eitherdirection, he is ordinarily compelled to wait the length oftime that it requires to make a round trip on such linethat is block

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.