Image from page 321 of “The mystic test book; or, The magic of the cards. Giving the mystic meaning of these wonderful and ancient emblems in their relationship to the heavenly bodies, under all conditions; with rules and processes for reading or delineat

A few nice discover card images I found:

Image from page 321 of “The mystic test book; or, The magic of the cards. Giving the mystic meaning of these wonderful and ancient emblems in their relationship to the heavenly bodies, under all conditions; with rules and processes for reading or delineat
discover card
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: mystictestbookor00rich
Title: The mystic test book; or, The magic of the cards. Giving the mystic meaning of these wonderful and ancient emblems in their relationship to the heavenly bodies, under all conditions; with rules and processes for reading or delineating the emblems
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Richmond, Olney H
Subjects: Fortune-telling Card games
Publisher: Chicago, Ill
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
l£BI®SOM

Text Appearing After Image:
/J7 ^ ^c <^ /.- /(./T- /f /f /-/ J of theChicage. ir- 6 1? /J/7 J THE MYSTIC TEST BOOK. 319 different kinds of tarots are entirely different. They alsorequire different treatment, and possess different disposi-tions ; just as human beings do. Not only that, but theydifferentiate in the sam,e manner that chemical atoms andmolecules do. Some families of tarots are very prolific,such as the Normal and Primo. Others are so choice andhighly evolved, that only a dozen exists in the entireuniverse. The Primo family has 795,680 members; only reckon-ing near relatives. The Normal family has over 800,000 members; whilethe Marvel group is known to have sixty sub classes, with850,000 members and miore being discovered every year. These are all mathematical tarots, made from thenumbers 1 to 25 and no two alike. All together there are only about three million figuretarots. But those made from the Mystic emblems, num-ber into billions, and then some. Their number are likethe sands of the sea sho

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 171 of “The clinical use of prisms; and the decentering of lenses” (1893)
discover card
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: clinicaluseofpri00madd
Title: The clinical use of prisms; and the decentering of lenses
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Maddox, Ernest Edmund, 1860-1933
Subjects: Lenses
Publisher: Bristol : J. Wright London : Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Fig. 62.—The prism measure, used to discover the opticalcentre of a lens. mark this distance by an ink dot on the glass,then we can place the said ink dot under the toothand read off what prism is virtually combined withthe lens at this point, directly in front of the eye.In this way we discover the prismatic effect of the ISO PRISMS. spectacles without any calculation. This appli-cation of the instrument, though not mentioned byits inventor, makes it as useful to the surgeon asit is to the optician, and renders any descriptionof the analyser almost unnecessary, except for afew who may have had it constructed, or who wishgreat exactness with pebble lenses, as well as withglass ones. The analyser, which is shown in Fig. 63, ha? aplate of glass, c d, which is movable from side to side.The letters a b indicate a narrower plate of glass, also k, f

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. G3.—The Analyser. movable, marked exactly across the middle with atransverse line x. On either side of the slides is ANALYSIS OF SPECTACLES. 151 a millimetre scale with the zero in the centre. Thebroad slide has a long line w right across it oppositethe zero of its scale. The card r s has only one lineupon it, exactly beneath the central lines of the glassstrips, and it can be placed either in the bottom of theapparatus, as in the figure, or in the grooves higher up,for lenses whose focal length is shorter than the heightof the glass plates above the lowest grooves. The cardis generally used in its lowest position, because distanceof the line upon it from the lenses, as we have alreadyseen with prisms, magnifies the phenomenon, and makesthe experiment more delicate. The height of the uppersurface of the glass plates from the card in the lowestgrooves is about 4^ inches. To analyse a pair of spectacles, lay the centre of thebridge on the line w, and place the observing eye sotha

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 424 of “Industrial medicine and surgery” (1919)
discover card
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: industrialmedici1919mock
Title: Industrial medicine and surgery
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Mock, Harry E. (Harry Edgar), 1880-
Subjects: Occupational diseases Working class Surgery Medicine
Publisher: Philadelphia and London : W. B. Saunders Company
Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
and is covered with a capemade from a sheet. 5. She then goes into the adjoining room, where the doctor andnurse remain constantly, and is examined. As there is no undueexposure of these girls two can be waiting while the doctor is examin-ing one; a sheet suspended between the waiting girls and the onebeing examined will add to the privacy. WOMEN IN INDUSTRY 417 The cape worn by these girls (see Fig. 57) has a large neck openingand can be pulled down over either breast for the purposes of examina-tion, the other breast remaining covered. Either side of the backcan be similarly examined. The sides of the chest can be examinedthrough the side openings of the cape. This permits of examiningthe entire chest as far as the waist line without exposing any largearea at one time. The nurse who is present moves the cape for thedoctor. This examination consists of (a) reading nurses findings on the his-tory card and also urinalysis; (6) examining eyes, nose, teeth, tonsils «-S,FT.-9M-lN. =>

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 57.—Illustrating type of cape used to cover chest of girls during physical examination. and pharynx; (c) palpating glands of neck and thyroid; (d) examiningheart by auscultation (palpation, percussion and blood-pressure are onlydone when some indication is found); (e) percussing lungs and then ex-amining by auscultation; (/) recording all findings on history card. While examining the lungs and heart both breasts can be inspectedfor suspicious swellings and the girl questioned about these. Whenindicated the breasts should be thoroughly palpated—usually throughthe thin cape. While the nurse is standing over the girl she cancarefully inspect the hair and if signs of pediculosis are present 27 418 INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE AND SURGERY she will then thoroughly examine the employee. Many cases ofpediculosis have been discovered by this method. The doctor asks questions regarding abdominal and extremityconditions. If in the examination, history or the urinalysis showthe need of a more com

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.