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Image from page 242 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
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Identifier: belltelephone6667mag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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1957 and again in 1960,the amount of debt financing last yearreached an all-time high. Interest cost to Bell System com-panies varied from a low of 4.85 percent for a New York Telephone Com-pany offering in January to 6.03 percent that Pacific Telephone is payingfor a 0 million issue sold in No-ember. Other Bell System companies whichsold bonds last year include Ohio,Chesapeake and Potomac of Virginia,Mountain States, Southwestern,Chesapeake and Potomac of Wash-ington (D.C.), Northwestern, South-ern, and Southern New England. Inaddition, AT&T sold two 0 millionissues in 1966. Cardboard Computer Bell Telephone Laboratories has de-veloped a novel computer to helpstimulate high school students inter-est in physics. The CARDboard Illus-trative Aid to Computation — calledCARDIAC, for short — is a cardboardmodel which has the basic workingparts of an actual digital computer. It was designed by David W. Hagei-barger, a member of the InformationProcessing Research Departmentat

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Bell Laboratories, for use in The Man-Made World, a new program de-signed to improve the teaching of highschool science. With the aid of CARDIAC, studentsare becoming aware of the computer,not as a thinking machine, but as amachine responsive to mans instruc-tions. By following a red line path onthe plastic and cardboard model, stu-dents can follow steps taken by a com-puter in executing programs and canuse CARDIAC to solve problems. Theycan perform logical operations and seehow abstract concepts of logic can bemade concrete in circuits similar tothose used in computers. Thus, the cardboard computer givesthe student a working illustration ofprinciples discussed in Logic andComputers, the first phase of the ex-perimental course which was preparedby contributors to the EngineeringConcepts Curriculum Project. Five BellLabs engineers and scientists, profes-sors from a number of universities,and several high school science teach-ers are among those contributing tothe experiment, which is s

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Image from page 86 of “Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates;” (1
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Identifier: cu31924019227044
Title: Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates;
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Moller, Helen Dunham, Curtis
Subjects: Dance Dance
Publisher: New York, John Lane company London, John Lane
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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nt andcan understand the cause that went before the fact. TheGreeks adored the human form, and most of all in grace-ful and vigorous action. Their dancing, more than anyother motive for physical expression, combined thesequalities. It did more than that. Lucian writes: Inthis art the functions of mind and body are united. Itexercises the limbs and at the same time employs theunderstanding; for in it nothing is done without wisdomand reason. Referring to emotional interpretations inthe Greek dance, Xenophon says: Nothing of the bodyshould be idle; the neck, limbs and hands must all bemade use of. When Demetrius witnessed a dancer,without any musical accompaniment, represent one ofthe old myths of the gods he cried out: I not only seeall you do, but even hear it also; for your hands seem tospeak to me! Fifty-three Classic perfection of repose, with one limb bearing the bodys weight whilethe other, with the knee flexed, preserves balance, is one of the Greekdancers earliest achievements.

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Our Debt to Classic Sculpture Dimly, perhaps, but still plainly enough to con-vince us of their truth, all these testimonies are corrob-orated in what is preserved to us o£ the sculpture of thatperiod. We who are earnest in our efforts to replacedancing upon its ancient foundation of truth and beautyshould therefore give constant study to the sculptureswhich so faithfully portray it. A modern close studentof the subject—John Warrack—has well written: Itwould be difficult to overestimate the value of dancingof so highly intellectualized a type in educating a nationin the elements of sculpture. The dancer had to repro-duce, with little if any external aid, the whole range ofhmnan thought and feeling in terms of bodily gestureand movement, and his art was closely followed and criti-cized by a crowd of keenly discriminating spectators, whocondemned any departure from the severest artisticseemliness and restraint. His physical conformation,his fairness of proportion and his condition

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