Image from page 376 of “The chiefs of Grant. Memoirs (Communication. – Charters.) [With dishes, including portraits and facsimiles, and genealogical tables.]” (1883)

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Image from web page 376 of “The chiefs of Grant. Memoirs (Correspondence. – Charters.) [With plates, including portraits and facsimiles, and genealogical tables.]” (1883)
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Identifier: chiefsofgrantmv100fras
Title: The chiefs of Grant. Memoirs (Correspondence. – Charters.) [With plates, including portraits and facsimiles, and genealogical tables.]
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Writers: Fraser, William, Sir, 1816-1898
Subjects:
Publisher: Edinburgh
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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barony of Freuchie, andWester Tulloch, utilizing the places of Mulben and others in barony ofRothes. Caused by this arrangement had been that James Grant obtainedthe only management of the estates. But, at their entry upon them, theywere encumbered with big debts, also with all the provisions toward twodowagers, for woman Lilias Murray ended up being still alive.2 The witnesses to the arrangement between James Grant and hismother had been George Earl of Seaforth, James Lord Deskford, ThomasMKenzie of Pluscardine, Sir Robert Innes of Balveny, James Sutherland,Tutor of Duffus, and John Grant of Moyness, and these appear tohave appended their signatures not only as formal witnesses to thedue execution of this deed of arrangement, but to own been present asthe younger Lairds council of guidance. For their names may also be addedthat of John give, the younger of Ballindalloch. There is no record of 1 first Letter at Castle Grant. 2 Extract Discharge and Renunciation, dated at Freuchie, 11th might 1637, ibid.

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Image from page 8 of “The liberator” (1831)
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Identifier: liberator186232126garr
Title: The liberator
12 Months: 1831 (1830s)
Writers: Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879 Yerrinton, James Brown, 1800-1866
Topics: Antislavery movements
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : William Lloyd Garrison and Isaac Knapp
Adding Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Associates of the Boston Public Library / The Boston Foundation

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naolmus (o as.-i.-l, the woman in decreasing lifes toilsomeask.—JtoWoW Qmxttttj July i.- .«J HE we, we T? E II A T O R — IS VtillUSHKl) — EVEEY FRIDAY MOBNING, — AT— 221 WASHINGTON STRKET, BOOM. No. G. ROBERT F. WALLCUT, Gkxkral Agent. II2F TERMS — Two dollars and lifty dollars per an mini,in advance. jiQpFive copies will bo delivered to ono target for tenDOLLARS, if payment be made beforehand. £gT All remittances tend to be to bo made, and all letters re-lating towards the pecuniary problems of tbe paper arc to budirected (post-paid) toward General Agent. Et^ commercials inserted at rato of five cents perline. g5f The Agents regarding the American, Massachusetts, Penn-sylvania, Ohio and Michigan Anti-Slavery Societies areauthorised to get subscriptions for LniiiiiATOit. (TJ?~ These men constitute the FinancialOmmiittec, but are perhaps not in charge of any debts of thepaper, viz :—Fuascis Jackso.v, Eumuxd Qdincy, EdmkxdJackson, and Wk.vdell Phillips. WM. LLOYD GARRISON, Editor.

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Proclaim Libsrty throughout all tb.3 land, to r,llthe residents thereof. I set tins down while the legislation of nations. We say that mil-itary authority takes, for tho time, the area of most munic-ipal institutions, and SLAVERY ONE OF THE RESTSund that, under that condition of things, up to now from the beingtrue that tho States where slavery exists have tho exclusive*management of tho subject, not only tho Phebident orthe Lsiteij States, but tho UOMHAITDEB for the Anvr,HAS POWER TO PURCHASE THE UNIVERSAL EMAN-CIPATION OF SLAVES From the immediate your slaveholding States get to be the theater of a war,civil, servile, or international, from that instant the war powersof Congress extend to interference with the organization ofslavery, atlanta divorce attorneys way in which it could be interferedwith, from a claim of indemnity for slaves taken or de-stroyed, to your cession of shows, burdened with slaver;-, toa international power. … its a war power. I state it is a warpower ; when your country is in fact in war, whetherit bo a

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Image from page 193 of “Newfoundland at the beginning of the 20th century : a treatise of history and development” (1902)
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Identifier: newfoundlandatbe00harv
Title: Newfoundland at the start of the twentieth century : a treatise of history and development
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Harvey, M. (Moses), 1820-1901
Topics: George V, King of good Britain, 1865-1936
Publisher: New York : The South Publishing Co.
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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h itbrings, these lands need remained valueless indefinitely.These land funds, it should be noticed, are acknowledged by Mr.Reid instead of a yearly subsidy in money as payment foroperating the line the very first term of years when of necessitythe revenue from passenger and goods traffic should be small.The colony therefore escapes the hefty cost of operating the line atfirst because of the concession of the places which are entirelyunprofitable. Moreover, Mr. Reid engages to sell their lands atthirty dollars an acre—the Government annoyed cost to all bonafide settlers. Various other advantages will be the conveyance of mails three timesa few days in the place of fortnightly as previously, with a rise ofbusiness. The connection at North Sydney using Americanrailway system opens up a desirable route for tourists and travelers,and gives a fast path of transportation for goods. That a smallcolony, certainly not wealthy, has actually discovered these types of nature andenergy concerning undertake and carry out such an enterprise and 172 NEWFOUNDLAND.

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Placentia. in order to make provision for repayment of interest on its expense iscertainly significantly to its credit; which is today rather specific thatit can shoulder the burden of debt incurred by its constructionwithout any undue strain. Before the great innovator, therailway, old things will pass away and a unique and much better socialand professional life will begin. In 1898 the us government entered into a new agreement withMr. Reid, that has been ratified by the Legislature, the balance beingpassed by a formidable majority. In accordance with this newagreement Mr. Reid undertakes to work all railways forfifty many years, stringent problems concerning management, quantity oftrains, prices, etc., becoming laid down. For reversion regarding the NEWFOUNDLAND. 173 railway after fifty many years he agrees to cover ,000,000within a year. Hence the colony is forever relieved of theheavy expense of running the railway which for a lot of yearswould usually be a drain in the revenue. The main benefitof the railroad is the setting up of t

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