Image from page 382 of “The book of British ballads” (1842)

A few nice debt counseling images I found:

Image from page 382 of “The book of British ballads” (1842)
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Identifier: gri_33125012902363
Title: The book of British ballads
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Hall, S. C. (Samuel Carter), 1800-1889
Subjects: Ballads, English
Publisher: London : J. How
Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute
Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

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to fare ;To his hachborde he clasped me, And robd me of all my merchant ware :And mickle debts, God wot, I owe, And every man will have his owne;And I am nowe to London bounde, Of our gracious king to beg a boone. That shall not need, Lord Howard sais ; Lett me but once that robber see,For every penny tane thee froe It shall be doubled shillings three.< Nowe God forefend, the merchant said, That you shold seek soe far amisse !God keepe you out of that traitors hands! Full litle ye wott what a man hee is. Hee is brasse within, and Steele without, With beames on his topcastle stronge ;And eighteen pieces of ordinance He carries on each side along :And he hath a pinnace deerlye dight, St. Andrews crosse that is his guide ;His pinnace beareth ninescore men, And fifteen canons on each side. Were ye twentye shippes, and he but one ; I sweare by kirke, and bower, and hall;He wold overcome them everye one, If once his beames they doe downe fall. ^ F. TO. Fairholt del. T. Armstrong sc. 362

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Sbir ^nUre&3 barton. This is cold comfort, sais my lord, To wellcome a stranger thus to the sea : Yet He hring him and his shipp to shore,Or to Scottland hee shall carrye mee. Then a noble gunner you must have, And he must aim well with his ee,And sinke his pinnace into the sea, Or else hee never orecome will bee :And if you chance his shipp to borde, This counsel I must give withall,Let no man to his topcastle goe To strive to let his beams downe fall. And seven pieces of ordinance, I pray your honour lend to mee,On each side of my shipp along, And I will lead you on the sea.A glasse lie sett, that may be seene, Whether you sayle by day or night;And to-morrowe, I sweare, by nine of the clocke, You shall meet with Sir Andrew Barton, knight. The merchant sett my lorde a glasse Soe well apparent in his sight,And on the morrowe, by nine of the clocke, He shewed him Sir Andrew Barton, knight.His hacheborde it was gilt with gold, Soe deerlye dight it dazzled the ee :1 Nowe by my faith,

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Image from page 133 of “Legal and other lyrics; with explantory notes and a glossary” (1888)
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Identifier: legalotherlyrics00outr
Title: Legal and other lyrics; with explantory notes and a glossary
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Outram, George, 1805-1856
Subjects: Law English language — Dialects Scotch
Publisher: Edinburgh : W. Blackwood
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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her the summons o Wakenin. She had plighted her troth—they had fixed on the day—A arrangements completed—nae chance o delay ; She was thinkin on this, And entranced wi bliss,When they sent her the summons o Wakenin. THE PROCESS OF WAKENIN. 113 Her friends were sae kindly — her true-love sae prized,—Surrounded by them, an by him idolised ; She had just passed the night In a dream o delight,When they sent her the summons o Wakenin. She feed the best counsel—what could she dae mair 1She read through the papers wi sorrow an care,But could only mak out,Thai beyond ony doubt,Twas a wearifu process Wakenin. An hex friends that she thought wad he constant for live, Of cour.-c they grew Bcarce, an kept out o her way; Fot aaebody kend Ilnw the matter wail end,When they heard o the process o Wakenin. An hex true-love fox whom .-lie wa.l gladly gien a,Slid cauld frae her grasp like a handfu snaw;—she gied up tin iAn gied «11• tie ghai b,An deed o a process o Wakenin. ii

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Ta reel o lullochgonim. 115 € c s s i o 33 o n o r u m.* Air— Tullockgorum. Comb ben ta house, an steek ta door,An bring her usquebaugh galore,An piper pla wi a your powr Ta reel Tullochgorum.For w ■ be croose an canty yet— (iroose .in canty, Croose an canty—be croose an canty yet, Around a I [ieland jorum. r.. the law f Scotland, ■•*■ debtor Lmpriaoned for debt, or in certain equivalent circumstanoi . since imprisonment fr abolished, maj institute a suit of curio bonorum, Under it, the < loui t, ii ed of 11 j «- debtoi hone b inability to pay, may grant him protection again I claim for then existing, upon hii making a conveyance of .-ill his for hi cr< ditoi bel f, and might him liberation, it in prison* 116 CESSIO BONORUM. Wese be croose an canty yet,For better luck she never met—Shes gotten out an paid her debtWi a Cessio Ponorum ! Huch ! tirrum, tirrum, &c. She meant ta pargain to dispute,An pay ta price, she wadna dot,But on a

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Image from page 345 of “Alumnae Recorder” (1888)
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Identifier: alumnaerec18881892penn
Title: Alumnae Recorder
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Pennsylvania Female College Alumnae Association
Subjects: Chatham University–Alumni and alumnae–Periodicals
Publisher: Pennsylvania Female College Pennsylvania College for Women
Contributing Library: Chatham University, Jennie King Mellon Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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by men must be shared by women;the mutual interests of both are established. Whatever proves beneficialto one will be equally helpful to the other, and whatever tends to im-prove or advance one will do likewise with the other. As the poet com-pares the two, as the bow and the bowstring, useless one without theother. The moral obligation imposed upon each member of society is the per-formance of such duties as are within their power and will benefit theirfellow beings. We receive our livelihood through the labor of others,and in turn we owe a debt of usefulness to others. And while realizingthis fact as we pass along the journey of life, whether it be the exaltedstate of affluence and power, or the modest tenor of the lowly, when wehave arrived at the night of our existence, and the light is fading slowly,let us hope that our lives may be classed among those who for the bet-terment of themselves, or their fellow men, never wasted an opportunity. E. W., Class of 89. 22 ALUMNA RECORDER.

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Differences. Nature is a universe of differences, in all around, matter or mind,this dissimilarity is noticeable ; no two particles have been created exactlyalike, and we wonder and admire how nature, wise and frugal, couldcommit such disproportions. Although nature has caprices which artcannot imitate, yet through art and literature we are made acquaintedwith the many nations and the differences existing between them. To Shakespeare we are indebted for one of onr greatest displays ofcharacters, and how they vary ! Some are exaggerated, many true to life;Shy locks are often met with, Macbeths read of, Portius loved, Rosalindsimitated and Romeos wished for. Verestchagin has delighted us with a marvelous collection of paint-ings, probably containing a more varied assortment of subjects thanthose of any other one artist. His studies of heads are wonderful; hereyou see a pious priest giving counsel, there you know that face, full ofcunning and hate, is planning some crime ; you long to he

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