Great Debt Therapy images

A few nice debt counseling images I found:

Image from page 107 of “Men and manners of old Florence” (1909)
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Identifier: cu31924030941565
Title: Men and manners of old Florence
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Biagi, Guido, 1855-1925
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, A. C. McClurg and co.
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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eturned home, thinking it a thousand years tillthey should obtain the keys. And they went to fetchthem, but first they paid the debts, as Giovanni hadordered. And when the debts were paid they weregiven the keys, and they returned home and openedthe chest and found therein the iron bar and thewriting : This is the will of Giovanni Cavazza; hewho unto others doth give himself and all, by this rod ofiron shall he be killed withaV Now this example, which is distinguished by thatpleasant cheerfulness which enlivens some of Boc-caccios tales, this jest which pleased our moralist somuch that he related it twice in his pages, and notwithout a touch of malice in his enjoyment, gives usan insight into certain hidden aspects of his nature,certain incorrigible defects in his character of astuteand circumspect merchant. Beneath the habit of thedevout moralist we discover the striped hose and thepurse of the merchant; under the outward semblanceof religious unction we recognise the furtive cunning

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THE CHURCH OF SANTA REPAEATA AND THE CAMPANILE,{From a iiiiiiiafiirc of the Biadajoh.) [To faci page 77- FLORENTINE MIND AND MANNERS 77 of that native trickery which neither religion norexamples could succeed in restraining. The modernmerchant makes no pretences, because he belongs toa different age and a different race ; he knows nowaverings between good and evil, for the simple reasonthat he looks only to the useful, into which either ofthe other qualities may enter with varying percentage.The fourteenth-century merchant wants to make agood profit, but he always keeps an eye on the safetyof his soul, and his consequent uncertainties are easyto read between the lines of his counsels. Listen tothe practical and crafty advice he offers in matters ofbusiness : When thou hast need that another should renderthee a service, go into his house, that is, into the houseof the man from whom thou art going to ask theservice, because he will not refuse thee in his ownhouse as he would do outside.

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Image from page 185 of “Lincoln, the lawyer” (1906)
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Identifier: lincolnlawy1762hillin
Title: Lincoln, the lawyer
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Hill, Frederick Trevor, 1866-1930
Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Lawyers Presidents
Publisher: New York : Century Co.
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

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In March, 1849, Lincolns official termexpired, and then for the first and only time inhis life he became an applicant for office. Thepost he desired was the commissionership of theGeneral Land Office in Illinois, but Justin But- 157 LINCOLN THE LAWYER terfield, a fellow-member of the bar from Chi-cago was appointed, and Lincoln was afterwardoffered, and fortunately declined, the gover-norship of Oregon, returning to Spring-field and the practice of the law, num-bering among the clients whom he hadacquired in Washington no less a personthan Daniel Webster,1 a somewhat authoritativerecognition of Lincoln as a lawyer. 1 Mr. Ben: Perley Poore is authority for the statement thatWebster insisted that Lincoln charged him too little for hisservices, and that he always felt himself in his counsels debt. Thematter on which he had retained him involved clearing the titleto certain real estate in an embryo city (probably Rock IslandCity) laid out where Rock River empties into the Mississippi. 158

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XVI LIFE ON THE ILLINOIS CIRCUIT IT has been repeatedly asserted that Lin-colns legal reputation was entirely local,and that he was unknown as a lawyerbeyond his immediate neighborhood; yetit is a fact that he had no sooner an-nounced his intention to resume practicethan he was offered a partnership by Mr.Grant Goodrich, one of the prominent attorneysof Chicago, with a wide and lucrative clientage.Lincoln had an idea, however, that he was threat-ened with consumption, and fearing that citywork would undermine his health, he declinedthe proposal and returned to his old office inSpringfield. There is no evidence, except his own, thatHerndon maintained anything more than a nom-inal practice after he was left to his own devices;but nevertheless Lincoln offered to continue the 161 LINCOLN THE LAWYER partnership with him on the same generous termswhich had governed their original alliance, andin the spring of 1849 the firm of Lincoln &Herndon again started in business, with head-quarter

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Image from page 683 of “North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]” (1894)
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Identifier: northcarolinachr49unit
Title: North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference
Subjects: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Greensboro, N.C., Methodist Board of Publication, [etc.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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CHARLOTTE METHODISM. The Western North Carolina Conference will holdits next session in Tryon Street church, Charlotte, N. C, beginning November 10. Bishop W. W. Dun-can, D.D., of Spartanburg, S. G, will preside. Withhis wise and mature counsels, and his able and in-cisive manner of conducting the conference, we mayexpect a pleasant and profitable occasion. CharlotteMethodism is a thing of healthy and vigorousgrowth. It has grown with the city, and is one ofthe great factors that make for the betterment of thegreat mass of people gathered there. Tryon Street church, where the conference is tomeet, is the old mother church. Rev. T. F. Marr, D. D., the present pastor, has led his flock well andwisely. The church has a strong congregation, andhas confidence in the wisdom of their pastor, andyielded readily to his leadership. As a result, thisyear they have built one of the very best equippedSunday-school rooms. Every class has its own room,besides the main room which is ample to accommo-

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REV. T. F. MARR, D. D.,Pastor Tryon St. Church, Charlotte, N. C. date the assembled school. In these class roomsthe various committees will hold their sessions dur-ing Conference. The Sunday-school annex costabout ,000.00. Calvary church, on South Church Street, has beena landmark in that part of the town for many years.It has done a great work, and Rev. A. R. Surratt,the present I very efficient pastor, is holding thechurch to its former traditions of useful evangeliza-tion. Time will never tell the good that has beendone, and is now being done at Calvary. This has been a remarkable year for the congrega-tion at Trinity. A young church, a few years agobuilt a beautiful, modern church, with a debt ofabout ,000.00 at the beginning of this year. Butwith a young, vigorous church, led by a young, vig-orous pastor, in the person of Rev. J,. A. B. Fry, theydetermined to rid t hemselves of that debt, and successhas come to them. As they approached the end,and in view of having the chur

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