Image from page 206 of “Dentos” (1922)

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Image from page 206 of “Dentos” (1922)
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Identifier: dentos1922unse
Title: Dentos
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Loyola University of Chicago – Chicago College of Dental Surgery – History Loyola University of Chicago School of Dentistry Schools, Dental – Illinois – yearbooks
Publisher: Loyola University Chicago College of Dental Surgery
Contributing Library: Loyola University Chicago Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

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the Trowel Club) : What will youtell your wife when you get home? Bette: Oh, nothing much, Good morning, or something like that. She willsav the rest. F—is for freshmen attending Dent College,R—is for running in pursuit of knowledge,E—is for energy, we have it in store,S—is for supplies we buy by the score.H—is for high, five flights do we climb,M—is for money, were broke all the time.E—is for English, to us quite a bore.N—is for nitiation, it makes us feel sore. C—is for classmates, a bunch of good men,L—is for laboring our credits to win.A—is for all of us, long, short and fat,S—is for Sophomores, we soon will be that.S—is for Springtime, vacation, you knowWell all get a job and knock in some dough. Why is it a dentist always looks down in the mouth; Do you know that in Wisconsin they say, You lie like a dentist! k- Dr. Salazar: Bukey, describe the distal end of the Fibula.Bukey: Vel, dis projection is the malicious. Page 195 )922 -as BB- —^f^^Dentos- Ep

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Mrs. Hoffman: The average vocabulary of a student is very limited. Canyou tell me what three words you use the most ?Bell: I dont know.Mrs. H.: Correct.Chorus: Give him an A. Kamin (just after charging a purchase at Frames) : I suppose you wantm- fathers name and address.Ruddy : Yes, what is it ?Kamin: Ah, ah, its ah-er-er give-give me-a-p-pen-pencil and Ill wri-write it. Dr. Kendall: What kind of a salt does it make?Groetzonger: A neutral acid salt. Hariing: How come all these Bull Frogs are all females? S. O. L.Rosie was leaving Bloomington for C. C. U. ?. Dad lectured at length onthe evils of the big city and ended up by telling son if he was ever in trouble towire as briefly as possible. A few weeks later Dad received a wire which readlike this: Dad: S. O. S. $-P. D. G. R. S. V. P. Son. A. D. W. Pacjc 106 ^- 1^22 ■as BB- ®^^Dent0 -SB A STUDY IN SCARLET He told the shy maid of his love,The color left her cheeks; And on the shoulder of his coatIt showed for several weeks. W. D.

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Image from page 240 of “The birds of Ohio; a complete scientific and popular description of the 320 species of birds found in the state” (1903)
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Identifier: birdsofohiocompl00daw
Title: The birds of Ohio; a complete scientific and popular description of the 320 species of birds found in the state
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Dawson, William Leon, 1873- Jones, Lynds, b. 1865
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Columbus, The Wheaton publishing co.

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the bird-man nor to disturb his treasures. Dense shade, open clearing, crowdedsaplings, scattering bush-clumps, dry land and swampy—all are to Ije foundwithin the limits ofthat precious bun–dred acres, and allmake separate con-tribution of interestto the eyes and earsof the ornithologist.It would seem thatthe force of somevenerable traditionimpels each avianwanderer, each rarerbird of passage, topause and rest, orworship, in this an-cient sluiue. Tospeak of warblersalone, it was herethat we first sawGi>lden – winged,Brewster, Hooded,and a score of lesserlights. Here Strongsaw the Connecticut,and Jones the Prai-r i e and Kirtland.Here only last sea-son a K e n t u c k yturned u]) a hundredmiles beond his cus-tomary range. Insliort all l)ul five ofthe forty species ofWarblers credited toOhio ha-e rejinrtedin these allied bits of woodland. liut of all the spots in this avian paradise the choicest is Warbler cor-ner, and of all the birds which crowd to the edge of the wood to mark

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•THREE KINGLY OAKS. 156 THE BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. l]ie rising sun the brightest is Prometlieus. the torch-bearer. Like a beaconhght his glowing breast sends a quick answering flasli to tlie first greetingof the eastern majest}-, and drunk with joy, the tiny spark moves off toset the woods on lire. When his back is turned you lose him in the uppergreen, but once around and flash! flash! come swift messages of beauty fromthis divinely fashioned heliograph. It is enough! You know him now. For the rest the BlackburnianWarliler hops about, and flits, and snatches bugs like other birds. Like

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Image from page 769 of “Story of the Sherman brigade.The camp, the march, the bivouac, the battle; and how “the boys” lived and died during four years of active field service…” (1897)
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Identifier: StoryOfTheShermanBrigade.theCampTheMarchTheBivouacTheBattleAnd
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Hinman, Wilbur F
Subjects: Sherman-brigade United States-History-Civil War-1861-1865 Regimental histories Ohio Militia
Publisher: Alliance, O. The author

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with the dance!was the cry. The fiddlers struck up a lively tune and the ruc-tion was over. The revelry continued until daylight. Our boys tools girls behind them upon their horses,and in this way went home withthem. Part of them stayed twoor three days in the neighbor-hood, and were in high feather.There was plenty of musicin our Texas camps. Everyregiment had scores of menwho could sing, and ours werenot exceptions. Solos, quar-tets and choruses were oftenrendered in a style that wouldhave done credit to trained vo-calists. There were several fid-dles and men who could playthem—perhaps not in the style of Ole Bull or Remenyi, buttheir audiences were not critical—and the music was all-sufficientfor the stag-dances that were so common. There was a guitarin the Sixty-fifth, which had escaped all the perils of campaign-ing for more than two years. Many will remember the frequentvisits of Dr. Wheeler, of one of the Illinois regiments, who usedto play the guitar and sing by the hour.

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HUGH P. ANDERSON, SURGEON, SIXTY-FOURTH. 1865.] CHAPTKR LXVII. LAST DAYS OF OUR SERVICE, asure Trips to Lavaca—A Naval Catastrophe—Officers ata Negro Ball—Watching for the Muster-out Order cap-tain Charley Bakers Story—The Fifty-First IllinoisGOES Home, which Gives us Hope—Camp Sherman—TexasNorthers —A Wrecked and Deluged Camp—Major orlowSmith and His Pipe—Lieutenant Kanels Joke—Promotionsthat Did not Promote. HEAT and mosquitoes combined to make our existence atCamp Irwin almost insupportable. The daily round be-came monotonous in the extreme. Occasional reliefwas found in excursions to the Guadalupe river, and toLavaca, which was our watering place—a sort of Saratoga.Leaves of absence from camp for two or three days could usuallybe had for the asking. Small parties frequently went to Lavacato sail and bathe and fish and gather oysters. On one of thesetrips, in which the writer was a participant, General Stanley andGeneral Conrad were met at Lavaca, on pleasure

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