Image from page 1553 of “Rod and gun” (1898)

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Image from page 1553 of “Rod and gun” (1898)
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Identifier: rodguncan13cana
Title: Rod and gun
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Canadian Forestry Association
Subjects: Fishing Hunting Outdoor life
Publisher: Beaconsfield, Que. [etc.] Rod and Gun Pub. Co. [etc.]
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Wear well because they are made of the best material by themost skillful craftsmen. Shoot well because they hold the chargecompactly together at extreme ranges. Handle well because thegreatest attention has always been paid to the distribution ofwood and metal, to insure perfect balance and the most sym-metrical outline. Twenty-bore Parkers have set the pace for small bores in America, and are growing in popularity every year with the most progressivesportsmen. For further information regarding guns in gauges ranging from 8 to 28, address PARKER BROS., neriden. Conn. N. Y. Salesrooms, 32 Warren St. I si: ROD AND GLX IX CANADA.

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The Race for the No. 5, Brainerd Shield—Bobby Hutcheson,H3LS Just Missed a Bird. Aubiii ami Hiitcliesoii of tlu- M. G. Club with 21apioco, with W. Forbes high on the St. HubeitClub with 20. Again the team average of thowinning score only showed 19,/.% per man.Team scores were—(25 birds ])ir man). (Montreal) Five-Man Cup)^lontreal— Hutcheson 21 Aubin 21 Kenyon 19 WesUake 19 R.iinville 19 99St. Hubert (Ottawa 1 Forbes 20 Beattie … 19 Heney 19 Sibbitt l^ Corby IS 94 Things had broken blue indeed lOr the St. Hub-ert Club, and what luck there had been was so faragainst them Under the handicap they deservefull credit, therefore, in pulling out a win for thenew Brainerd Shield, which as a trophy is cer-tainly worth the winning. The race called for50 targets per man. thiee shooters each team,and it was a see-saw up to the last shot, the St.Hubert Club nosing out by two birds. The individual scores in tliis race were:—• Montreal—HutchesonKenyonRainville St. Hubert (Ottawa).Sibbit

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Image from page 306 of “A history of the Peninsular War” (1902)
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Identifier: historyofpeninsu07oman
Title: A history of the Peninsular War
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Oman, Charles William Chadwick, Sir, 1860-1946
Subjects: Peninsular War, 1807-1814
Publisher: Oxford : Clarendon Press
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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t get forward. They must have suffered some-what from the cannonade, as they had twelve officers and a goodmany scores of men killed and wounded. At this moment Wellington came upon the field, havingcrossed the now-repaired pontoon-bridge, for whose completion 1 A similar phenomenon was seen in 1864 in General Grants army atthe battle of Cold Harbour in Virginia—a number of desperate assaultson the Confederate trenches having failed to break in, the units detailed forthe last attack grounded arms and refused to budge. Though the orderto advance had been given, not a man stirred. The troops stood silent butimmovable, presenting the verdict of the rank and file against the mur-derous work decided upon by their commander. Longs Life of Robert E.Lee, p. 348. Cf. Swintons Army of the Potomac, p. 487; and WilkesonsLife in the Ranks of the Army of the Potomac, p. 109. Not a man stirredfrom his place—I heard the order given, and I saw it disobeyed. BATTLE 0F r PIERR^ %*gg*of Hilli Coutot*

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1813] COMPLETE REPULSE OF THE FRENCH 275 he had been waiting for some time. He was not far ahead of twobrigades of the 3rd Division—the Portuguese brigade had beenleft behind to guard the bridge,—and he was able to assure Hillthat the 4th Division from near Arbonne, and two brigades ofthe 7th Division would be with him ere very long. The 6thDivision was already up; it had just reached the Horlopo knollas Abbes last attack was repelled, having come up from Ustaritzas hard as it could march. The battle is all your own, saidWellington to Hill, and he very handsomely directed hislieutenant to finish it for himself, and to take the credit. SirRowland, with his usual competence and coolness, resolved toend the game with his own forces, and not to wait till thereinforcements came up. In the centre matters were clearly finished. On the leftDaricau had abandoned his half-hearted attempts on theLarralde height, and was drawing back by the road along whichhe had come, through the flats. Prin

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