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Image from page 346 of “Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.” (1887)
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Identifier: ourfiremenhistor00cost
Title: Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Costello, Augustine E.
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, A. E. Costello
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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lIt K I R K M K N. 311 tbfl most elevated grounds. The company made several attempts to procurewater, but I>eing satisfied by their experiments of tin; impracticability of tin:undertaking, the concern fell through. In L825 five additional cisterns were ordered to be constructed. In conse-quence of a serious (ire in the Eighth Ward, tbe lire companies were orderedto 1111 all the public cisterns with water. Two years later (IS.*;) seven addi-tional cisterns were ordered ; eighteen more in 1828, and sixteen additionalones in 1829. The city then possessed forty public cisterns, at an estimatedCOBl of twenty-four thousand dollars. Each cistern contained usually aboutone hundred hogsheads of water. But the supply of water was neverthelessinsufficient. At least sixty additional cisterns were required for that portionof the city between Fourteenth and Grand Streets on Broadway, and Four-teenth and Pearl Streets on Chatham Street, and on the east side. It was

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THIRTEENTH STREET RESERVOIR AND WASHINGTON INSTITUTE.[Thirteenth Street and Fourth Avenue.] therefore recommended that the city lay down two lines of iron pipe, for thesecurity of the city in the section mentioned The firemen built a cistern under the entrance-way to the Old FiremensHall in Fulton Street. This was the first cistern ever built in the city, andcontained a hundred hogsheads of water. Engine Companies Nos. 13, 18, 21,and -J4 share the credit of this work. Much disagreement and dissension appear to have prevailed amongcitizens and officials as to the propriety of making the cost of constructingcisterns a public charge. Fully a year had been occupied with such dissen-sions, when, finally, on March 29, 1827, the Committee on Assessments of theCommon Council reported favorably for making the cost of cisterns a publiccharge. This report was negatived. Public cisterns were, however, estab-lished for the use of the Department, some twenty-five additional having beenerected up to

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Future SMART Rotor Blades
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Image by NASA on The Commons
Helicopters today are considered a loud, bumpy and inefficient mode for day-to-day domestic travel—best reserved for medical emergencies, traffic reporting and hovering over celebrity weddings. But NASA research into rotor blades made with shape-changing materials could change that view. The solution could lie in rotor blades made with piezoelectric materials that flex when subjected to electrical fields, not unlike the way human muscles work when stimulated by a current of electricity sent from the brain. NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, also known as DARPA, the U.S. Army, and The Boeing Company have spent the past decade experimenting with smart material actuated rotor, or SMART, technology, which includes the piezoelectric materials. Tests in a NASA wind tunnel of this SMART rotor hub confirm the ability of advanced helicopter-blade active control strategies to reduce vibrations and noise.

Image Credit: NASA

Image from page 227 of “Sport and travel in the northland of Canada” (1904)
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Identifier: sporttravelinnor00hanb
Title: Sport and travel in the northland of Canada
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Hanbury, David T. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Hunting Inuit language
Publisher: New York, The Macmillan company London, E. Arnold
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ng theirsole sustenance. The older women were tattooed on the face in themanner common amongst all the Huskies I have comein contact with. They were also tattooed on the hands,wrists, and the lower part of the arm in a manner that Ihad not seen before. The men wore their hair either cropped very short,convict fashion, or it was left long with only a small, M3 144 THE NORTHLAND OF CANADA circular, closely-cropped patch on the crown. In this theydo not differ from the Huskies of Hudson Bay. Themen all had large stomachs, but this is characteristic ofthe whole of the Eskimo tribes, and probably results fromtheir eating enormous quantities of meat at one time. With the exception of a few strings of beads, traded onone of their journeys on the Ark-i-llnik River, the womenwore no articles of personal adornment, but their deer-skin clothes were ornamented with strips of white deer-skin worked in between that of a darker colour. Sealskinappeared to be used only for making footgear. <2=iar^

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Tattooed hand and arm. Their habitations, both iglus and deerskin tents, wereclean and well looked after. One naturally expected theusual strong smell of the seal-oil lamp, which is keptburning day and night to melt ice for drinking-water. Bows and arrows, and spears tipped with native copper,were their weapons in hunting deer. A special kind ofspear was used for harpooning seals. Stone kettles andstone lamps were their only cooking utensils. At thistime, being out of seal meat, they were living on oil andblubber, a diet that evidently agreed well with them. Ki-li-nek-meut was the name of this tribe. Another tribe, further east, near King Williams Land,I fancy, was known by the name of Net-ti-ling-meut.About this latter tribe I was told terrible tales. Theywere reported to be very bad men, and very savage ; butthis I do not credit. I was informed that in the previouswinter, food being very scarce, murder and cannibalism OGDEN BAY TO MELVILLE SOUND 145 had been the order of the day. Su

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