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Image from page 15 of “Tourist travel via Grand Trunk Railway System : and connections, including Niagara Falls and Gorge, the Highlands of Ontario, comprising Georgian Bay, Muskoka Lakes ; St. Lawrence River, Montreal, Quebec, the Saguenay River, the Ran
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Identifier: touristtravelvia00granuoft
Title: Tourist travel via Grand Trunk Railway System : and connections, including Niagara Falls and Gorge, the Highlands of Ontario, comprising Georgian Bay, Muskoka Lakes ; St. Lawrence River, Montreal, Quebec, the Saguenay River, the Rangeley Lakes, White Mountains, and the Atlantic Sea-Coast
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada
Subjects:
Publisher: [Montreal] : The System
Contributing Library: Brock University
Digitizing Sponsor: Brock University

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ek is a recognized tourist point, special rates being grantedfrom all parts of the country, and is an all-the-year-round resort,both for invalids and pleasure-seekers. Pursuing our journey, we cross the State of Michigan in a north- easterly direction, passing l.ansinfj, the capital; Diirantl, an importantrailway center, Flint, Lapeer, etc., and at Port Huron, we reach its eastern houndary, the St. Clair river,which is also the national boundary between the United Stales andCanada. This city is delightfully located on the west bank of the river,and is a place of much commercial importance, byreason of its manufacturing and shipping interests. of the waterway itself, became a que-stion of increasing gravity witheach succeeding year, and was happily solved by the successful con-struction and operation of the wonderful St. Clair Tunnel. The struc-ture is equally interesting as an engineering feat, and its conceptionand completion reflects great credit upon its projectors. It is a contin-

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THE ST. CLAIR TUNNEL.In view of the fact that the St. Clair KiveL is thechannel through which there annually passes a vol-ume of shipping greater than that which enters thejiort of New York, the crossing of the stream, in theinterests of a commerce equal in importance to that nous iron tube extending under tliebed of the river, and with its ap-proaches is nearly two miles inlength, and nineteen feet in diam-eter. Its cost was 82,700,000. A re-cent writer says of it: It seemssignificant that this tunnel permitsthe intersection of this great waterhighway by an equally great railwaysystem, without jeopardizing the in-ternational interests which are in-volved in both, and renders especi-ally appropriate the title, *the linkthat binds two great nations. The location of Port Hurongives it natural advantages as a sum-mer resort, and numerous placesnear by afford its people a range ofouting places, quite extensive in thevariety of their attractions. Huron-ia Beach is a resort of growing im-po

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Image from page 432 of “The Mythology of all races ..” (1918)
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Identifier: mythologyofall12gray
Title: The Mythology of all races ..
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Gray, Louis Herbert, 1875- ed Moore, George Foot, 1851-1931, joint ed MacCulloch, J. A. (John Arnott), 1868-1950. joint ed
Subjects: Mythology
Publisher: Boston, Marshall Jones company
Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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n the Treasuryfor some years. Thence they were removed to the BernardFree Library in Rangoon, where they may be still be seen, butthe special festival on Poppa Hill has been abandoned. The Mahagiri Nats were of great service to King Kyanyit-tha, both before and after he succeeded to the throne of Pagan.In recognition of this he issued an order that all his subjectsshould honour these two Nats by suspending a votive coco-nutin their houses, and this has been done ever since, although thebrother gets all the credit in many places, being formally recog-nized as the Eing Saung Nat, the household spirit. The coco-nut will be found hung up in every Burman house, not merelyin Upper Burma, but even in Rangoon. It is usually set in arectangular bamboo frame, and over the top of the coco-nut PLATE XVII Mahagiri Nat Min Mahagiri, or Magaye, is the spirit in whosehonour a coco-nut is hung in the porch of every Bur-mese house. After Temple, Thirty-Seven Nats ofBurma, No. 2. ^t^smsm^m^^-ยป>^<

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THE THIRTY-SEVEN NATS 345 is placed a square of red cloth which represents a turban.When any illness breaks out in the house or In the family, thecoco-nut is inspected, the special points being that the water,or coco-milk, should not have dried up, and that the stalkshould still be intact. If anything is amiss, a fresh nut is putin place of the one which is discarded. There is a suggestionthat this use of the coco-nut is a reminiscence of head-hunting,or at any rate of the collection of skulls in ancient days. Atall events it is recorded that as long as the feast was kept, sacri-fices of animals and offerings of alcoholic liquor were madeto the Mahagiri Nats. Burmese histories state that in Decem-ber, 1555, of our era, the Hanthawadi Sinbyuyin, the Brangin-oco of the early European writers, reached Pagan in thecourse of his progress through his newly conquered dominions,and there he witnessed the festival held in honour of theMahagiri Nat and his sister. Noticing that white buffaloes,

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