Image from page 223 of “The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society” (1898)

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Image from page 223 of “The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society” (1898)
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Identifier: journalofamerica00amer
Title: The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: American-Irish Historical Society
Subjects: American-Irish Historical Society Irish Americans Ethnology
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : The Society
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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nd ProfessorRogers was chosen President. Associated with him during allits struggles for organization, were many of Massachusetts mosteminent scientists and educators. In 1864, Professor Rogers, in writing to his brother, mentionsthe admirable lectures of Henry Giles, the noted Irish-Americanlecturer and essayist, delivered in Boston. Professor Rogers, never very strong, was obliged to take oceantrips, and was much sought by foreign colleges for addresses onscientific subjects. His correspondence with James RussellLowell and Eliot, later President of Harvard, shows the esteemin which he was held by these gentlemen. On June 1st, 1870, he resigned as President of the Institute onaccount of ill health; and, while addressing the graduation classof the Institute in 1882, suddenly dropped, and was dead in ashort time. Few men in any walk of life had more glowing and gracefultributes paid them by men of eminence and prominence, thanWilliam B. Rogers, the son of an Irish emigrant and patriot.

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JOHN DOYLE. Reproduction by Anna Frances Levins LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. 197 William B. Rogers and his brothers lived splendid and usefullives, and no better monument could be placed to the credit ofany man than the internationally known Massachusetts Instituteof Technology. LETTER OF JOHN DOYLE. The following letter was written by the father of the lateJohn T. Doyle of Menlo Park, California, upon his arrival in theUnited States an emigrant from Ireland. The original letter wasgiven by Miss Doyle, a granddaughter of John Doyle, to RichardC. OConnor, Esq., of San Francisco, Vice-President-General ofthis Society. In sending to the Journal a copy of the San Fran-cisco Monitor of February 8th, 1913, in which the letter waspublished, Mr OConnor writes: John Doyle was a native of Kilkenny, Ireland. He was theson of Edmond Doyle, who had joined the United Irishmen in1798, whose home was wrecked, and whose family was scatteredamong various relatives. John Doyle leaves many descendantsand relati

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Image from page 188 of “New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions” (1889)
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Identifier: bedfordmassac00newb
Title: New Bedford, Massachusetts; its history, industries, institutions and attractions
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.). Board of Trade Pease, Zeph. W. (Zephaniah Walter), b. 1861 Hough, George A Sayer, William L. (William Lawton), 1848-1914
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Publisher: [New Bedford] Mercury publishing company, printers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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;^ high, with a monitor roof, and four hundred by one hundredfifty feet in area, while the picker and dye house is two hundred thirtyby fifty-two feet in area. The mill is provided with five thousand spindles, sixty-threebroad looms ninety-five and one hundred ten inches in width, andtwelve sets of cards. The machinery is operated by a two hundredfifty-two horse power Harris-Corliss engine, with three six-foot boilers,made by Cunningham, of Boston. Between seven hundred thousand and eight hundred thousandpounds of wool are worked annualh, and the cloth is made here andcolored in the wool and piece. The annual product is about eighthundred thousand yards of cloth, and one hundred sixty-five handsare employed. The officers of the corporation are as follows ; President — Loum Snow, Jr. Treasurer—Robert Snow. Directors — Edward D. Mandell, Charles W. Plummer, FrederickS. Allen, Charles W. Clifford. George S. Homer, Thomas H. Knowles,and Loum Snow, Jr. •t/-vy V ■i;fZ

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INDUSTRIAL AND FINANCIAL. 173 THE MANUFACTURE OF OIL. To mention New Bedford without devoting some space to her oilmanufactories would be to neglect the genius of the lamp, and toomuch credit cannot be given this industry for the present position ofthis city. William A. Walls interesting picture of The Origin of the Whale-tishery, which now hangs in the parlors of the home of the late Mrs.Charles W. Morgan, contains an illustration of the first oil factory inNew Bedford. It consisted merely of a trypot under an old shed bythe shore. Near by stands a man pouring oil from a long handleddipper into a wooden-hooped barrel. Another is handling over theblubber, while a third is coopering a barrel. The latter is engagedin conversation with an Indian who is seated upon a broken mast.On the shore, keeled over on her side, is one of the small sloopsemplo3ed in whaling at that time, and the river lies outstretched inthe background. Seated upon the frame of a grindstone, and giving directions toa

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