Cool Credit Monitoring images

Some cool credit monitoring images:

Image from page 178 of “Water reptiles of the past and present” (1914)
credit monitoring
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: waterreptilesofp1914will
Title: Water reptiles of the past and present
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Williston, Samuel Wendell, 1851-1918
Subjects: Aquatic reptiles
Publisher: Chicago, Ill., The University of Chicago Press
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
semiaquaticconnecting links, called the aigialosaurs and described on a pre-ceding page, have set at rest all doubt as to their real affinities.They are real lizards, differing less from the living monitor landlizards than do the monitors from some other land lizards, espe-cially the amphisbaenas and chameleons. And to Adrian Camper SQUAMATA 167 is due the credit for the recognition of their real relationship,though it required more than a century to prove that he wasright. Very recently, and since the foregoing was written, a remarkablenew type of mosasaurs has been discovered in Alabama and Europe.Only fragmentary jaws, a few vertebrae, and some skull bones areknown, so that it is impossible yet to decide how closely the newform is related to the true mosasaurs, but so far as the evidencegoes the only distinguishable character is the teeth. These, insteadof being elongated and pointed, are nearly spherical, as shown inFig. 80. Such teeth could have been used only for crushing shell

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 80.—Globidens alabamensis. Part of mandible, with teeth, natural size.(From Gilmore.) fish, and not at all for the seizure and retention of slippery fishes.The genus, which was called Globidens by its discoverer, Mr. Gilmore,includes two known species, from Alabama and Europe, the latterrecently described by Dollo. It has been suggested that this pecu-liar kind of dentition was a more primitive or intermediate one, akind that the first mosasaurs had before they became fully adaptedto the water; but this is doubtful, since Globidens comes from lateCretaceous, and must be one of the later types. If Globidens is atrue mosasaur, and it seems to be one, its life-habits must havebeen remarkably different from those that have long been known.Possibly when the limbs and more of the skull are found, Globidenswill prove to be of a distinctive type. 168 WATER REPTILES OF THE PAST AND PRESENT SNAKES The chief differences between snakes and lizards have alreadybeen given and need not be rep

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 248 of “The poetical works of William Cowper. Complete edition, with memoir, explanatory notes, &c. ..” (1872)
credit monitoring
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: poeticalwor00cow
Title: The poetical works of William Cowper. Complete edition, with memoir, explanatory notes, &c. ..
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: Cowper, William, 1731-1800
Subjects:
Publisher: London, F. Warne and co. New York, Scribner, Welford and Armstrong
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
pursued.To study culture, and with artful toilTo meliorate and tame the stubborn soil;To give dissimilar yet fruitful landsThe grain, or herb, or plant that each demands ;To cherish virtue in an humble state, 4 And share the joys your bounty may create;To mark the matchless workings of the powerThat shuts within its seed the future flower,Bids these in elegance of form excel,In colour these, and those delight the smell,Sends Nature forth, the daughter of the skies,To dance on earth, and charm all human eyes ;To teach the canvas innocent deceit,Or lay the landscape on the snowy sheet;These, these are arts pursued without a crime,That leave no stain upon the wing of time. Me poetry (or, rather notes that aimFeebly and vainly at poetic fame)Employs, shut out from more important views,Fast by the banks of the slow-winding Ouse;Content if, thus sequesterd, I may raiseA monitors, though not a poets praise,And while I teach an art too little known,To close life wisely, may not waste my own.

Text Appearing After Image:
THE DIVERTING HISTORY OP JOHN GILPIN, SHOWING HOW HE WENT FARTHER THAN HE INTENDED, AND CAMESAFE HOME AGAIN. 1782. The story of John Gilpins ride was related to Cowper by his friend, Lady Austen, whohad heard it as a child. It caused the poet a sleepless night, we are told, as he was keptawake by laughter at it. During these restless hours he turned it into the famous ballad.It appeared in the Public Advertiser, November 14th, 1782, anonymously. A celebrated actor named Henderson took it for one of his public recitations at Free-masons Hall. It became immediately so popular that it was printed everywhere—innewspapers, magazines, and separately. It was even sung as a common ballad in thestreets. It has preserved its popularity to the present date. The original John Gilpin was, it is said, a Mr. Beyer, a linendraper, who lived at theCheapside corner of Paternoster Row. He died in 1791, at the age of nearly a hundredyears. John Gilpin was a citizen Of credit and renown,A trainband capt

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 7 of “Scientific American Volume 87 Number 23 (December 1902)” (1902)
credit monitoring
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: scientific-american-1902-12-06
Title: Scientific American Volume 87 Number 23 (December 1902)
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: scientific power niagara american apparatus electric silk gas power company scientific american spring blocks propeller shaft horse power american supplement niagara falls tific american niagara power canadian niagara
Publisher:

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
BOW OF THE WYOMING AT 11.8 KNOTS.

Text Appearing After Image:
Bunsen tube, so that the desired increase in the pro-portion of .air was obtained, a high degree of tempera-ture produced and the resulting incandescence far ex-ceeded that of ordinary burners. This was furtherincreased by permitting the gas to becomeheated before entering the burner. This design is known as the Lucas lampand to the inventor is due the credit otproviding the gas industry with a meansof displacing electric arc lamps, for ourpopular gas arcs are the outgrowth of theLucas principle. MONITOR WYOMING DOING 12.37 KNOTS ON THE MEASURES MILE. A Curious Accident. A curious accident befell an electricstreet railroad car in the north of Englandrecently during a thunderstorm. At theterminus a car was waiting to begin ajourney, and several passengers had takentheir seats both inside and on the outsideof the car. There came a vivid flash oflightning, followed immediately by a ter-rific report on the car, and the whole in-terior of the vehicle seemed to be ablaze.When the flame had

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.