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Image from page 972 of “History of Utah: comprising preliminary chapters on the previous history of her founders, accounts of early Spanish and American explorations in the Rocky Mountain region, the advent of the Mormon pioneers, the establishment and di
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Identifier: historyofutahcom03whit
Title: History of Utah: comprising preliminary chapters on the previous history of her founders, accounts of early Spanish and American explorations in the Rocky Mountain region, the advent of the Mormon pioneers, the establishment and dissolution of the provisional government of the State of Deseret, and the subsequent creation and development of the territory
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Whitney, Orson F. (Orson Ferguson), 1855-1931
Subjects: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mormons Mormons Mormon Church Mormons
Publisher: Salt Lake City, Utah : G. Q. Cannon & Sons Co.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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due to frauds whereby, at the Bingham precinct thirteen illegalvotes had been received for Allen, while at South Cottonwood sixteenvoters who would have cast their ballots for Ferguson had had theirnames wrongfully stricken from the registration lists. Mr. Fergu-sons attorney asked that these sixteen votes be accepted, and thatthe returns from Bingham be thrown out. In the case of Mr. Toronto, between whom and Mr. Galligher atie vote was reported, a discrepancy in the returns indicated thatToronto ought to have been credited with several more votes thanthose counted for him. His attorney asked that the ballot box bereferred to in order to decide the question. In the case of Mr. Rumel it appeared that his majority overColonel Page could only be maintained by counting for one and thesame person certain votes certified in the lists as having been castfor John H. Rumel, Jr., and other votes accredited to John H. Rumel;the difference being due to a clerical error on the part of one or more

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Image from page 532 of “Life and times of Stevens Thomson Mason, the boy governor of Michigan” (1920)
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Identifier: lifetimesofstev00hema
Title: Life and times of Stevens Thomson Mason, the boy governor of Michigan
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Hemans, Lawton Thomas, 1864-1916 Michigan. Historical Commission
Subjects: Mason, Stevens Thomson, 1811-1843
Publisher: Lansing, Michigan Historical Commission
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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lay, and spoke in just words of praise of cer-tain institutions, which had sustained themselves withhonor and credit amid so many temptations and exam-ples of fraud; it unanimously recommended the repealof the general banking law, and with like unanimityjoined with the Governor in the recommendation of theincorporation of a State bank, under the control of theState itself, which they urged should be subject at alltimes to the most rigid scrutiny, and to the strictestguard against the tendency of banks to lend too muchand put too many notes in circulation, which theydeclared to be the fruitful source of so much evil. Some authors, biased by partisan fervor, have soughtto take sentences from the Governors message to theLegislature of 1839, and use them as proof that he hadstood sponsor for a system that had brought the Stateto the verge of bankruptcy and ruin. The message bearsno such construction. In it the Governor said, No Stateperhaps, has suffered more from the evils of a deranged

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CHARLES E. STUARTKalamazoo lawyer and politician. Mem-ber of the state Legislature in 1842, laterin Congress, and holder of many publicoffices o£ trust.

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Image from page 561 of “An American history” (1919)
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Identifier: americanhistory00step
Title: An American history
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Stephenson, Nathaniel W. (Nathaniel Wright), 1867-1935
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Publisher: Boston, New York [etc.] Ginn and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ORY politics and denounced the administration as excessivelycorrupt.^ 687. The Election of 1876. The effect of the Fifth Ave-nue Conference was seen in the Republican national con-vention. Ail the enemies of Blaine combined to securethe nomination of Rutherford B. Hayes, governor of Ohio,a moderate politician pledged to the reform of the civilservice. His nomination, however, did not satisfy all themembers of the conference. The two leaders parted com-pany. Though Schurz decided toremain with the Republicans andsupport Hayes, Adams went overto the Democrats and supportedtheir candidate, Samuel J. Tilden,of New York, a fearless man of highcharacter who had made a greatname fighting ofiicial corruption inNew York City.^ By this time, eight of the recon-structed states had thrown off therule of the carpetbaggers, andthese with a number of states inthe North and West supportedTilden, giving him an electoral vote of 184. The remainingstates, except three, were carried by Hayes who received

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RUTHERFORD B. HAYES * Several notorious scandals had contributed to form a general impressionthat the public service was honeycombed with fraud. It was proved that a cor-poration known as the Credit Mobilier had bribed members of Congress to votefor bills favoring its interests. The secretary of war, W. W. Belknap, was im-peached for fraud and narrowly missed being convicted. On the other hand,the secretary of the treasury, B. M. Bristow of Kentucky, showed himself anable and uncompromising reformer by hunting down and bringing to punish-ment the members of the Whisky Ring — a secret association of distillers andfederal officers that was extensively defrauding the government. Bristow wasthe first choice of the liberal Republicans for President. * He broke up the infamous Tweed Ring, a conspiracy of corru[it ix)liti-cians which robbed the city, through fraudulent contracts, of some 0,000,000.The head of it was sent to the penitentiary. RECONSTRUCTION 489 from them 172 electoral vo

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