Image from page 37 of “Negro slavery in the northern colonies” (1902)

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Image from page 37 of “Negro slavery in the northern colonies” (1902)
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Identifier: negroslaveryinno00bogg
Title: Negro slavery in the northern colonies
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Boggess, Arthur Clinton
Subjects: Slavery Theses
Publisher:
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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slaves are set down to Massachusetts.This return, made: by the marshal!, of the district, may be consideredas the formal evidence of the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts,especially as no person as appeared to contest the legality of thereturns. M. H. S. Coll. I, IV, 199, 204. It is scarcely proba-ble that none of these negroes and raulattoes were held as slaves,although many had been manumitted, and traffic in slaves had beenforbidden in Massachusetts in 1788.^ Vermont is credited with 17 slaves. This was the result ofa clerical error, and was officially corrected in 1870.^ The census of 1790 gave the number of free blacks as 59527.These were about equally divided between free states and slave states.The colored element at this census constituted ifg larger proportionof the population than ever after, viz., 19.3 percent. 1. Hist, of Slavery in Mass., 247. 2. Ibid, 125. 3. Ibid, 226. 4. New Eng. Hist, and Geneal. Regiater XIIX, 248. || 5. Amer. Statistical Assn Pub., 1890-91, 93.

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For the sake of comparison a few statistics of the number ofslaves elsewhere than in the northern colonies are given. The Lordsof Trade in 1721 reported: in South Carolina, 9000 whites and 12000 blacks;in North Carolina, 1600 inhabitants of which about one third a. 3.were blacks; in Maryland, 34796 whites, 7935 negroes; in Pennsyl-vania, 60000 whites and 5000 blacks, although others are said to haveestimated not more than half this number. In 1764, Colonel Bradstreet wrote:lam assured by persons late-ly from Illinois, that exclusively of the French Garrisons there,the Inhabitants are 600 fighting Men, have one thousand Negroes well-accustomed to the use of small arms, averse to our taking possession sr. of the country. The number of negro slaves bartered for in one yeai? ( 1768) on the coast of Africa, from Cape Blanco to Rio Congo, by the different European nations, amounts as follows: Great Britain, 53,100; British Americans, 6,300; France, 23,520; Holland, 11,300; Portugal, 1,700;

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Image from page 734 of “The library of American history, literature and biography ..” (1904)
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Identifier: libraryofamerica00mabi
Title: The library of American history, literature and biography ..
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Mabie, Hamilton Wright, 1846-1916 Birdsall, William Wilfred, 1854-1909 Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909
Subjects: American literature
Publisher: Philadelphia, Chicago [etc.] The J. C. Winston Co

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nized government, commanding the respect, and, to someextent, the fears of the world. Their army is complete in all its details andappointments, and it will be commanded by the foremost soldier of the country.General -Scott, whose devotion to the Union cause is attested by his drawinghis sword against his native State. They have also a navy that in a little while ROBERT E. LEE. 669 will blockade our ports and cut us off from all the world. They have nearly allthe workshops and skilled artisans of the country, and will draw upon theresources of other nations to supply any deficiency they may feel. And aboveall, we shall have to fight the prejudices of the world, because of the existenceof slavery in our country. Our enemies will have the ear of other powers,while we cannot be heard, and they will be shrewd enough to make the warappear to be merely a struggle on our part for the maintenance of slavery ; andwe shall thus be without sympathy, and most certainly without material aid from

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A SCENK IN PRESIDENT LINCOI-NS CAHINET.Secretary Stanton expressing an opinion about the conduct of the war. other powers. To meet all this we have a government to form, an army toraise, organize and equip, as best we may. We are without a treasury, andwithout credit. We have no ships, few arms, and few manufacturers. Ourpeople are brave and enthusiastic, and will be united in defense of a just cause.I believe we can succeed in establishing our independence, if the people can bemade to comprehend at the outset that to do so they must endure a longer war-and far greater privations than our fathers did in the Revolution of 1776. We•will not succeed until the financial power of the North is completely broken, 670 HIS CLEAR FORESIGHT. and this can occur only at the end of a long and bloody war. Many of ourpeople think it will soon be over, that perhaps a single campaign and one greatbattle will end it. This is a fatal error, and must be corrected, or we aredoomed. Above all, Virginians

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