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Image from page 62 of “How to collect money by mail; how to write effective collection letters–testing copy–planning a series–retail, instalment and dealer accounts–credit system–collection schemes and legal steps–how creditors cooperate to cure “sl
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Identifier: howtocollectmone00chic
Title: How to collect money by mail; how to write effective collection letters–testing copy–planning a series–retail, instalment and dealer accounts–credit system–collection schemes and legal steps–how creditors cooperate to cure "slow pays" and bad accounts. 157 money getting plans adopted by 43 correspondents
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Collecting of accounts Commercial correspondence
Publisher: Chicago, New York [etc.] : A. W. Shaw company
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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rness of his delay. Guard against the twists and angles of de-layed payment. Allow no excuse, no chanceto get out of sight, no ground for complaint. Show your man his interest in promptness.Then find the scheme that flashes your appeal. Get his attention. Make payment easy.Then hint what delay may bring—make eva-sion hard—set him thinking. Ef 5 ■ii: :iil HOW TO PUT EXTRA PRESSUREON OBSTINATE DEBTORS CollectionSchemes Reinforce YourLetters with – Self-addressed envelope Remit-easy Cards Tags and Reminders – Good Fellow^AppeaI I Helped You – Advertising Judgment Bother Debtor into — Payment by Sending Collector to Wait Notifying Employer – Dunning Over Telephone J Writing on SpecialStationery Take LegalSteps as Garnishment Replevin of Goods Suit for Judgment Suit for Damages CHART X: There are few debtors on the average list who wont paf. Most of them are merely slow pay and you need only jog their memory. The chart suggests schemes which will startle them to action Vlllt :ii«

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CHAPTER VII Effective Appeals to Debtors PLANNING schemes which will jolt the safe but slowpay delinquent out of his self-complacent, Oh, lethim wait, makes the collection man lie awake nights.Pressure of the proper sort can be applied to the ordi-nary debtor with comparative ease, but the surly andsulky, the careless and indifferent must be approachedin a novel way. They have to be started into droppingtheir dollars into the cash drawer of their creditors. This is the class which requires all the ingenuity ofthe credit man and his collectors. Callous to the ordi-nary methods of approach, this sort of debtor can behandled only by an attack from an unexpected quarter. The classification runs from the bride who confessesthat she doesnt know a thing about busdness to thepolished business man who by specious argument andclever talk has lured the credit man into planning un-safe terms for goods. The rule behind most schemesand levers for the collection of such accounts is to makethe debtor

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Image from page 151 of “Epitome of the history of medicine : based upon a course of lectures delivered in the University of Buffalo” (1898)
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Identifier: epitomeofhistory00unse
Title: Epitome of the history of medicine : based upon a course of lectures delivered in the University of Buffalo
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Park, Roswell,1852-1914
Subjects: Medicine History of Medicine
Publisher: Philadelphia : F.A. Davis Co.
Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

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ally to everybodythe gifts that God has conferred upon me, and I amnone the worse for it; just as the light of a candle willnot diminish no matter how many may come to lighttheir torches by it. Besides his smaller treatises, his large, collective workspassed through a number of editions, and were everywherereprinted and studied. Not only was he great in surgery,but he attained a high degree of expertness in midwifery.Among other things, he restored the forgotten practice ofpodalic version in cases where this procedure is necessary.He died in 1590. The doctrine of Pare on gunshot wounds was rapidlydisseminated. From 1550, Maggi, of Bologna, advocatedit without giving credit to its real author, and sustained itby decisive experiments. He observed that none of thewounded felt any heat, and that the torn portions of theirclothing showed no trace of fire ; and he shot balls throughpackages of powder without setting them on fire. At thesame time Lange spread this view in Germany, and Botal,

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Fig. 18.—Specclums for the Mouth and Womb. etc. A, A, mouth-mirror; in Latin, speculum oris. Ii, tongue-depressor. C,C, brandies to be placed under the chin. G, G, instrument for retrenchingelongated uvula. O. O, O, womb-mirror; in Latin, speculum matricis. m. m,artifical tooth of ivory or gold, attached by small gold threads. 71, n, threeartificial teeth joined together and attached by gold threads to the adjacentteeth on each side. (From the Works on r by Jiic<|iies Gitilleine.iu. chirurgeon ordinary to the King of France. 1049.) 13-4 THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE. of Turin, took it up (withholding, however, the trueauthors name). While Ambroise Pare did not disdain to act as ac-coucheur, it was his friend and pupil, Jacob Guillemeau(1550-1613), who, in the sixteenth century, most occupiedhimself with the practice of obstetrics. We owe to Guil-lemeau the first improvements that the moderns made inthis art; for instance, the proposition to rapidly and arti-ficially terminate parturiti

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Image from page 642 of “Christian herald” (1913)
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Identifier: christianherald36unse
Title: Christian herald
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors:
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Contributing Library: Christian Herald Association
Digitizing Sponsor: Tisch Library, Tufts University

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ttle, Wash.: xpedition successful. Accomplished firstI lete ascent of Mount McKinley June 7.. . Karstens, R. G. Tatum, Walter Harper, and] .ched top of South, the highest of all peaks,I clear day, when it was possible to read all the1,5s of the mountain and other points and makei.in that the peak we had conquered was the(est of all. ; /e successfully carried a mercurial barometeri e top and made complete readings and obser- ms, which, with simultaneous readings at en, should permit a close approximation of ;rue altitude when proper corrections are ap- 1. Water boiled at 174.9 degrees. The pres- jstimate of the summits height is upward of )0 feet. Ve were able to read angles on all prominent ts. With field glasses we clearly saw the )ole erected in 1910 by Thomas Lloyd expedi-on the North Peak (the lower of the two 1 peaks). ^fter completing observations on the summit loisted the American flag on the upper basin, ted a six-foot cross, and said Te Deum on highest point of North America.

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REV. HUDSON STUCKEpiscopal Archdeacon of Alaska The northeast ridge is the only possible approach to the summit. Due tothe violent earthquakes of last July, the higher ridges were terribly shattered,and this added largely to the danger, difficulty, and labor of the ascent. We spent three weeks in continuous bad weather, hewing a passage threemiles long through this side. This was the chief cause of delay, as we maderapid progress at all other stages of the journey. The chief credit for our success is due to Karstens good judgment, re-sourcefulness and caution. We did not have a single mishap. A number of attempts have been made within the last few years to accom-plish that which Dr. Stuck has now succeeded in doing. Professor Herschel C. Parker, professor of physics in Columbia Uni-versity, has made three expeditions with this pur-pose in view. On his last trip he succeeded inreaching a point within three hundred feet of thesummit, but was then compelled to turn back.The pictures of M

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