Image from page 82 of “The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection” (1915)

A few nice auto insurance images I found:

Image from page 82 of “The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection” (1915)
auto insurance
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Identifier: principlesofmill00brew
Title: The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Brewster, A. Irving
Subjects: Factory inspection Mills and mill-work Sprinklers
Publisher: Richmond Hill, N.Y. : A. Irving Brewster
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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e must belarge enough to supply water, under proper pressure(pounds to the square inch), to all of the automaticsprinklers attached to it, or at least the number that isliable to be opened by the heat or flame of a single fire.Pipe sizes for automatic sprinkler equipments will befound in the standard recommended by the NationalBoard of Fire Underwriters. It will be noticed that agiven number of automatic sprinklers (or heads) is al-lowed on a pipe of a certain diameter. Each size pipeis large enough to feed the number of automatic sprinklersallowed on it, including loss of pressure due to the waterrubbing against the inside surface (friction). The smallestpiping is at the ends of lines (^^laterals^) ; the largestpipes are the main supply pipes. Doubling the diameterof a pipe increases its carrying capacity four times, ap-proximately. Suppose a 2-inch water pipe is used for acertain purpose. The cross section of a 2-inch pipe con-tains 4 square inches, which is found by simply squaring

Text Appearing After Image:
SAVED BY SPRINKLERS Automatic sprinklers saved these buildings from theattack of an exposure fire across the street. Woodenwindow frames and sash in the lower building weredestroyed. 78 MILL AND FACTORY INSPECTION the diameter (multiplying the diameter by itself). Apipe of twice the diameter^ that is 4 inches, will have across section of 16 square inches which is four times thenumber of square inches in the cross section of a 2-inchpipe. The opening (orifice) of an automatic sprinkler is%-inch in diameter, or .39 square inches. Only one auto-matic sprinkler is allowed by modern pipe schedules to besupplied by a pipe 1-inch in diameter which is twice thediameter of the orifice of an automatic sprinkler, or .7854square inches. Private Fire Brigades.—Private fire brigades or-ganized among the workmen of a manufacturing plant,department store, shipping terminal, etc., drilled in theuse of private fire appliances, such as hose streams frominterior standpipes, yard hydrants, etc., are inv

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Image from page 78 of “The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection” (1915)
auto insurance
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: principlesofmill00brew
Title: The principles of mill and factory inspection for fire insurance purposes : with notes on the hydraulics of automatic sprinkler protection
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Brewster, A. Irving
Subjects: Factory inspection Mills and mill-work Sprinklers
Publisher: Richmond Hill, N.Y. : A. Irving Brewster
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
e other conspicnons place, to show exactlywhich gate valve is closed. All gate valves are numberedfor quick identification and on this board is a hook forevery gate valve, with the number underneath. The tell-tale tag stays on the proper hook until the closed gatevalve has been opened. Hose Connections.—Small hose is sometimes per-mitted to be connected to automatic sprinkler piping andis handy for both wetting down material inside of build-ings after a fire has been extinguished by automaticsprinklers and for throwing water on fires which cannotbe reached by the nearest automatic sprinklers becauseof obstructions to the distribution of water from the auto-matic sprinklers. Loss of Pressure.—There is a constant loss of pres-sure in water pipes due to friction between the water andthe inside surface of the pipes. This is also true of hose.Bends in pipes, fittings, valves, etc., all tend to reducethe pressure under which water is flowing through them. APPROVED AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS H

Text Appearing After Image:
THE NIAGARA, ISSUE B Automatic Sprinkler Company of America,New York City. 74 MILL AND FACTORY INSPECTION These losses of pressure can be considerably reduced bythe use of smooth piping, long bend fittings, minimumnumber of valves, etc. One-Supply Elquipments.—Automatic sprinklerequipments with one water supply are better than none,provided the one water supply is ample and reliable, butthey cannot be considered standard (see Water Supplies,Number of). The exceptions to this rule are automaticsprinkler equipments having a steel pressure tank as awater supply and a connection with a central station for fullsupervisory service (A. D. T. supervisory service). Whenan old building is not strong enough to support a gravityroof tank, and a tank cannot be placed on a trestle builtup from the ground, a good water supply may be obtainedfrom a public street main if of proper size and fed bothways, and the pressure in the street main meets the re-quirements. Partial Equipments.—Automatic spri

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.