Nice Annual Credit Report photos

A few nice annual credit report images I found:

Image from page 84 of “Annual report of the regents of the university on the condition of the State Cabinet of Natural History and the historical and antiquarian collection annexed thereto” (1850)
annual credit report
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Identifier: annualreportofr31850newy
Title: Annual report of the regents of the university on the condition of the State Cabinet of Natural History and the historical and antiquarian collection annexed thereto
Year: 1850 (1850s)
Authors: New York State Museum
Subjects: Science
Publisher: Albany, Regents of the University
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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y themselvesaccording to their tribal divisions ; the Wolf, Bear, Turtle, and Beavertribes, playing against the Deer, Snipe, Heron, and Hawk. Fromfifteen to thirty on a side are chosen, each taking from three to sixjavelins. The parties having stationed themselves several rods apart,upon opposite sides of a given line, a hoop or ring is rolled by one partyin front of the other, who throw their javelins at the ring as it passes.If the hoop is struck by one of them, the other party are required tostand in the place of the successful person and throw all their javelinsin succession at the ring. Those which hit are saved, and those whichfail are handed over to the other party, who in turn throw them at thering. Of this number, those which hit the hoop are won finally, andlaid out of the play; the balance are returned to their original owners.The successful party then rolls back the ring, and the game is thuscontinued until all the javelins upon one side are forfeited. Ga-ne-a, or Ball Bat

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5^ feet. This is the great game of the Indians. It is also of the highest an-tiquity, universal among, the Red races, and played with a zeal andenthusiasm which would scarcely be credited. In playing it they 80 denude themselves entirely, with the exception of the Ga-ka, or waistcloth, each one holding a hat, of the species represented in the figure.Gates are erected about sixty rods apart, upon opposite sides of afield, and the point in the game is, for each party to carry the hallthrough their own gate. Usually they have from six to eight on a sideto play the game, who are surrounded by a concourse of spectators.Commencing at the centre, each party strives to direct the ball towardstheir own gate, knocking it upon the ground or through the air; butmore frequently taking it up upon the deerskin net-work of the ball batand carrying it in a race towards the gate. When an opposite playerstrikes it ahead of the runner, the latter throws the ball over the headof the former towards the gat

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Image from page 67 of “The Mark Lane express, agricultural journal &c” (1832)
annual credit report
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Identifier: marklaneexpressa9319unse
Title: The Mark Lane express, agricultural journal &c
Year: 1832 (1830s)
Authors:
Subjects: Agriculture Farm produce Farm produce
Publisher: London : Isaac Alger
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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and foal,the silver medal offered by the Shire HorseSociety. About half a dozen good Hackneys with foalat foot, put in an appearance, the judges fixingtheir choice npon KJeleda, by Blue Peter III.,belonging to Mr. Ohas. Deverenx. Th?re was avery good class of Hackney foals. Contagious Diseases of Animals. Summary of Returns issued by th> Board of AiricuUwefor tk» uwi *Tvii«v» July 1. 1905 : – i Fever. ! Swine Slaughteredas Diseased or Ex-posed to Infection. °2Z X £ —iH ?1 H M if r- X Swine Outbreaks. . sio «Z M F- x x 117.* Outbreaks Reported. d :Z CO .£ •4 Otur Animls. 6 : z ■ 3 is Dcys. d : z • B -as? Inimils Attacked. ci =oZ 5 € — Outbreaks. . i—c ;iZ r- X O o — -~ ■»x c JS. • = 5 Animals Attacked. i :Z : : : e>- a Outbreaks. 6 : z • Anthrax. Animals Attacked. Z~ —. 5] x ^x Outbreaks. c —Z — dQ t— i— r: i- X * H – •ao i .•as■o . — s •£ = s v : i • S 3 a c 1* c II 9 U 62 MARK LANE EXPRESS. July 10,1905.

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Peterborough Show. The annual summer show of thi>s energetic aridprosperous, as well as useful, society, was heldon Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of lastweek, the weather proving exceptionally favour-able, and an excellent show resulted in everyway. Shire horses, which are always a strongfeature at these shows, were again very goodindeed. Hunters were also a very credit ableshow, more particularly as regards quality.Hackneys and driving horses were most conspicuous in the driving competitions. Cattlewere a good entry, and all the breeds (Short-horns, Lincoln Reds, Angus, and Red Polls)represented gave a very satisfactory account ofthemselves. Sheep and pigs were a small entry,these sections seldom being very well filled atthe shows of this society. Hunters. The catalogue commences with the hunters,of which, as stated, there were a number ofhorses, both adults and young stock, of very highcast. The first class was for weight-carryingbrood mares up to fourteen stone, of which nine

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