Nice 3 Credit Reports photos

A few nice 3 credit reports images I found:

Image from page 306 of “Report of Committee on school inquiry, Board of estimate an apportionment, city of New York ..” (1913)
3 credit reports
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Identifier: reportofcommitt02newy
Title: Report of Committee on school inquiry, Board of estimate an apportionment, city of New York ..
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: New York (N.Y.). Board of Estimate and Apportionment. Committee on School Inquiry
Subjects: School organization and management
Publisher: City of New York
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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s foremen, superintendents, or generalcontractors; (2) an architectural course, planned to train individualsto become architects and draftsmen, or to give a general course in me-chanical drawing; and (3) an arts course, designed for those interestedin drawing, design, arts, and crafts. In addition, Chicago provides eighttwo-year vocational courses for boys and four two-year vocationalcourses for girls, all work in any of these courses being credited towardgraduation from the four-year course. Los Angeles provides fiftN^-three differentiated courses in the six highschools of the city. Of these courses eighteen have a decidedly technicalbearing. These are: (i) mechanic arts; (2) domestic arts; (3) finearts; (4) commercial; (5) electricity; (6) mineralogy; (7) surveying;(8) mechanical drafting; (9) architecture; (10) pattern-making; (11)dressmaking; (12) millinery; (13) forging; (14) foundry; (15) cab-inet-making; fi6) machine shop; (17) mining and civil engineering;and (18) agriculture.

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COURSES (PROGRAMS) OF STUDY 263 Cincinnati provides seven technical curricula, among the seven beinga course in art and a course in music. Boston, Cincinnati, and Milwaukee also provide special two-year vo-cational courses for both boys and girls. In comparison with the provisions for special or technical courseselsewhere, therefore, New York City is seen to be far from abreast ofthe times. In the scope and intensivencss of industrial work for boys, in-dustrial work for girls, and commercial work for both boys and girls,it suffers by comparison with several of the other cities. This is strik-ingly true in respect to the offering in these subjects in the general or re-gional high schools. Moreover, considering the size of the city, thevarious nationalities represented, and the dilterent intellectual, artistic,and vocational aptitudes among the students, the provisions for specialcourses or special schools of other types in New York City fall far shortof what is being undertaken in seve

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Image from page 334 of “San Francisco’s horror of earthquake and fire … to which is added graphic accounts of the eruptions of Vesuvius and many other volcanoes, explaining the causes of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, comp. from stories told by eye
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Identifier: sanfranciscoshor00wils
Title: San Francisco’s horror of earthquake and fire … to which is added graphic accounts of the eruptions of Vesuvius and many other volcanoes, explaining the causes of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, comp. from stories told by eye witnesses of these frightful scenes
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Wilson, James Russel. [from old catalog]
Subjects: San Francisco Earthquake and Fire, Calif., 1906 Volcanoes. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa., National publishing co
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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a degree as to exhibit at night the most beautiful fireworkimaginable. The eruption came to its climax from the 5th to the loth ofAugust, on the former of which days, after the ejection of anenormous volume of white clouds, piled like bales of the whitestcotton, in a mass exceeding four times the height and size of themountain itself; the lava began to overflow the rim of the crater,and stream in torrents down the steep slope of the cone. Thiswas continued till the Sth, when the great mass of the lava wouldseem to have been evacuated, and no longer repressing by itsweight the free discharge of the imprisoned gases, allowed whatremaiued to be ejected in fountains of fire, carried up to an ERLITIONS IX MANY PARTS OF THE WORLD. 29n immense lieiglit in die air. The description of one of tliese Imust give in the pictnresque and vivid words of Sir WilliamHamilton hiinself. About nine oclock, he says, on Sunday the 8th of August, there was a loud report, which shook the houses at Portici and

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NAPLES. SHOWING MOUNT VESUVIUS IN THE DISTANCE. its neighborhood to such a degree as to alarm the inhabitants an^ldrive them out into the streets. ]Iany windows were broken, andas I have since seen, walls cracked by the concussion of the airfrom that explosion. In one instant a fountain of liquid trans-parent fire began to rise, and gradually increasing, arrived at soamazing a height as to strike eveiy one who beheld it with themost awful astonishment. I shall scarce!v be credited when I 294 ERUPTIONS IN MANY PARTS OF THE WORLD. assure you that, to the best of my judgment, the height of thisstupendous column of fire could not be less than three times thatof Vesuvius itself; which, you kuow, rises perpendicularly near3,700 feet above the level of the sea. (The height of my ownmeasurement in 1824 is 3,920 feet.) Puffs of smoke, as black as can possibly be imagined,suceeded one another hastily, and accompanied the red-hot,transparent, and liquid lava, interrupting its splendid brightnes

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Image from page 218 of “Minutes U.C.V” (1890)
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Identifier: minutesucv00unit
Title: Minutes U.C.V
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors: United Confederate Veterans. cn Mickle, William English, b. 1846. 2n Harris, Nathaniel Edwin, 1846-1929. The Civil War (OCoLC)4539048 3n United Confederate Veterans. Convention (1889 : New Orleans, La.). Proceedings of the convention for organization, and adoption of the constitution of the United Confederate Veterans (OCoLC)11772606 3n United Confederate Veterans. The flags of the Confederate States of America (DLC) 07028612 (OCoLC)1845883 1n
Subjects:
Publisher: New Orleans, La., United Confederate Veterans
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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95 16. 26 3 75 17. 27 162 55 * 19. 28 V. 1 00 21. 29 3 85 24. 30 49 30 25. 31 1 75 27. 32 4 25 30. 33 31 50 31. 34 : 240 00 – 35 6 45 Total :……. ,267 i Balance in bank . .■. 3 I [official] Adjutant General and Chief of Staff. New Orleans, La., April 2, 1903. We, the undersigned, a sub-committee of the Finance Committee, have examined tforegoing account of the Adjutant General, carefully checking each item, verifying tfootings, and comparing the expenditures enumerated with the vouchers submitted fexamination, and find the same correct in every particular. Accompanying the report iscertified statement from the Cashier of the Citizens Bank of Louisiana, that tbalance represented on hand is actually on deposit to the credit of the United Ccfederate Veterans, subject to check. W. J. WOODWARD,A. J. WEST,I^RED. L. ROBERTSON,PAUL SANGUINETTT,BENNETT H. YOUNG,; • Committee. iiLrv/rvi jw Maj-GeneralWM. E. MICKLE, Adjutant Generaland Chief of Staff. Uiiited ConfeclerateVeterans.

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Itemized I Statement of 4 Receipts • and Expenditures {from April 1 st, to December} 31 st, 19Q3.^^£|§| .; , J. B. GORDON, General Commanding. ;>■WM. E. MICKLE, Adjutant General and Chief of Staff. Major General WM. E. MICKLB, Adjutant General and Chief of Staff, in Account With United Confederate Veterans. Itemized Statement of Receipts and Expenditures FromApril 1, 1903, to December 31, 19f3. RECEIPTS. Date. Name of Camp. No. Amt. Apr. 1. Rivers Bridge 839 00 Isaiah Norwood 110 2 40 Coweta 1161 4 10 Albert Sidney Johnston 144 10 00 Ex.-Confd. Vet. Aran 8 5 00 Washington 239 5 60 Pat Cleburne 537 2 80 Capt. Thos. McCarty 729 4 00 Jno. B. Gordon 1397 2 50 Mcintosh 361 90 W. F. Tucker 452 3 20 Camp Cabell 1434 1 00 Bedford Forrest 1345 70 Howdy Martin ^ 4 00 John Pelham 629 4 10 Ned Merriwether 241 7 00 James Adams 1036 4 50 Holdenville 1450 3 80 John Pereival 711 7 00 Col. James Walker 24S 2 40 M. M. Parsons 735 4 00 D. L. Killgore 1376 5 70 R. E. Lee 485 4 10 Col. Geo.

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